Thanks for Being Great Customers!

Today’s guest blogger is Elizabeth Sanborn, a Customer Support representative at Logos.
I’ve been working here at Logos for just over three months, and before I started—I’ll be honest—I was a little scared. Everyone has heard horror stories about customer support, so I was a little nervous about the people I would encounter on the other end of the phone.
However, my experience working here at Logos has been quite the opposite. During my time here, I have met hundreds of wonderfully kind customers, who ask me how I am doing (and care about the answer!) and display the utmost patience with me, especially when I first started working here and was still learning the ropes. I’ve had a variety of great conversations while waiting for computers to reboot, downloads to finish, etc. I’ve even had a customer help me with Christmas gift ideas for my brother. It’s quite encouraging to see Christians act Christ-like, even in the little things of life like customer service. So thanks, customers, for being so fantastic and making the jobs of Logos Customer Support reps such a great experience!

More Jobs at Logos

Last week we mentioned that Logos is growing and that there are several job openings. Since then we’ve added even more new positions to the jobs page.
Here are the ones that are currently listed:

Head on over to the jobs page to find out more, like qualifications, responsibilities, and how to apply. If you know of someone who would be a good fit, let them know we’re hiring. Thanks for helping us spread the word!

Internships in Software Development

Can you help us find interns?
Logos Bible Software offers 12 week internships in software development all year round. Most join us for the summer, though, and we’re looking for this year’s team right now.
We are looking for people who love to write code, who want to work with the latest technologies, and who share our excitement about putting the best tools and technology possible into the hands of pastors, scholars and Bible students around the world.
We’re fun and we pay well.
Students can learn more at or by contacting me at or 800-875-6467 or 360-527-1700.

Jesus’ Use of Comedy to Combat Religious Errors

The Logos Lecture Series is one year old – and after 11 lectures we’re still going strong!

Tonight we will kick off another year of lectures, with Dr. Sam Lamerson of Knox Theological Seminary in Florida. The lecture, titled “Jesus’ Use of Comedy to Combat Religious Errors” will start at 7:00 PM at Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, Washington. The lecture is free and tickets are not required.

In his talk Dr. Lamerson will examine Jesus’ use of comedy (in the Aristotelian/Aristophanic sense) as a tool for exposing the political or religious errors of his day. Dr. Lamerson will show that Jesus did indeed engage in the use of comedy. After defining comedy, Jesus’ use of this tool in parables, short sayings, and actions will be pointed out and examined for principles that might be transferable to the Christian combating errors in the public square today.

Dr. Sam Lamerson is currently associate professor of New Testament at Knox Theological Seminary and Assistant Pastor at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. As a member of several scholarly societies, he is a frequent lecturer and has presented papers on various topics including the parables, contextualization of the Gospel, and ethics. His areas of special interest include the synoptic Gospels, the historical Jesus, forgiveness in Second-Temple Judaism, and the parables. Not only this, but Dr. Lamerson is likely to be our only speaker who has appeared on Nickelodeon.

This is sure to be an interesting event, so don’t miss out. We’ll see you at 7:00 at Mount Baker Theatre!

Show Us Your Syntax Searches

The Logos syntax databases and resources have revolutionized advanced searching and analysis of the Old and New Testaments in their original languages. As with most powerful tools, there is a bit of a learning curve to using them effectively. One of the best ways to learn how to use them is to reproduce the searches of others. This is easiest to do by seeing a series of screenshots or watching a video.
Learn by Example
To help you learn the ropes, we continue to provide you with blog posts and videos that discuss and demonstrate syntax searching. If you haven’t been over to the video tutorial page at recently, there are dozens of syntax videos that you can watch. I just updated it to include all of the syntax-related videos that have appeared here on the blog, so go take a look! If you have a slow internet connection, you may want to purchase the Syntax Demonstration Videos on CD-ROM.
Work Backwards
Another great way to learn how to perform syntax searches is to work backwards from one of the syntax resources.

This is the method I used to perform my first successful syntax search (i.e., the Holy Spirit communicating). I (1) found a passage of Scripture that had something I wanted to search for (Acts 13:2), (2) looked up that passage in the Clause Analysis resource, and (3) reproduced it in the syntax search. This method will involve some trial and error, so most users will want to watch several of the demo videos before trying this.
Show Us Your Syntax Searches
We love to see the ways you are putting the syntax tools to use. I stumbled across a blog post where one of our users creatively used the Anderson-Forbes Syntax database to locate all of the occurrences of bears in the Old Testament. His search missed one (Pr 17:12, where the gloss was “she-bear” rather than “bear”), but it was an excellent example of how syntax searching can be a very quick and simple way to access a list of data that would have taken longer to find with an English search or a combination of Hebrew and Aramaic morphology searches. Nice work, Mike!
If you blog about creative ways to use the syntax resources, send an email to and let us know. We’ll add a link to your post below. If we think it’s really cool, we may even take a whole post to show off your syntax skills! Just a hint: it should probably contain screenshots or video. (Check out Jing if you don’t know how to capture video on your screen.) We’re looking forward to seeing what you’ve got!

Call Logos and Get a Human

Technology is great. Our slogan here at Logos is Advanced Technology for Eternal Truth, and we’re sponsoring BibleTech:2008, a conference that explores the intersection of biblical studies and technology. Obviously, we love technology and are convinced that it can be immensely helpful—especially for things like Bible study. But new technology does not always result in a better way of doing things. People can still do many tasks more efficiently than machines—like answering phones.
Someone shared a link at the office yesterday for a website called the gethuman 500 database. It lists phone numbers that will get you a human on the other end of the line for over 500 businesses. About 10% of the numbers will take you directly to a human. Most require you to push a series of numbers to get a human on the line. For example, to talk to a human at Ford, you would need to call 800‑392‑3673 and then “press 0; at prompt press 0; at prompt press 0; at prompt press 1; at prompt press 0” to finally get to a human.
We’ve all had bad experiences with automated answering services. Most of them take forever, and the ones that require you to speak your information into the phone don’t work very well. It’s refreshing to get a human on the line who can quickly connect you to the right person or give you the information you want.
One of our highest priorities at Logos is to provide you with top-notch customer service. That’s why we put 800-875-6467 at the top of You don’t have to go to a website like the gethuman 500 database to find out how to contact us. And you don’t have to press 0 four times either. When you call Logos on Monday–Friday between 6 AM and 5 PM PST, a pleasant and knowledgeable human answers the phone and promptly directs your call to the right department—and that’s the way it should be.

Logos Is Growing

People carrying around computers and desks has been a common sight in the office recently. Our software developers and web developers, along with the Ministry Relations department and a few other individuals, have been in the process of relocating right down the street to a new office space in order to give our Electronic Text Development department the necessary room to continue growing. Training started today for a new group of book designers, and they are still looking to hire up to a dozen more. So if you live in the Bellingham area or are willing to relocate to this beautiful part of the country like I recently did, head on over to the jobs page, check out the job description, and send in your résumé.
As a result of this growth, you can expect to see tons of solid new Pre-Pubs coming down the pike in 2008. So be sure to keep your eye on the Pre-Pub page or subscribe to the Pre-Pub feed to stay up to date!

BibleTech:2008 Updates

BibleTech:2008 is only three weeks away! For those who are new to the Logos Blog, BibleTech:2008 is a two-day conference that will feature more than 2 dozen presentations on projects at the intersection of Bible study and technology. The event will take place on January 25 and 26 at the Seattle Airport Hilton Conference Center. Tickets are still available for the conference at a discounted rate.

Recently, there have been several updates to the BibleTech:2008 website. More presenters have been added to the conference and a session schedule is now available.

The most common question we have been asked about BibleTech is, “Do I need a degree in Computer Science to attend?” The answer is a resounding, “No!” During each session you will have a choice to attend a more technologically advanced presentation or one that is more geared towards the common Christian with rudimentary knowledge of the internet and computers. Think of it this way, if you enjoy reading this blog you will have a great time at BibleTech:2008.

Presenters and attendees will be flying into Seattle from all over the country and it looks like BibleTech:2008 is going to be a great event. Don’t miss out on all the fun! Purchase your ticket for BibleTech:2008 today.

We’ll see you in Seattle.

Crocodiles, Mummies, Homer’s Iliad and a Seminary Library

Those who have been Logos customers for awhile, those who follow our every move, may remember a blog post from over 2 years ago on a robotic book scanner. This is the APT Bookscan 1200; we’ve even got another web page describing it, with a video of the machine in action.
Many of the books that we put up on our Community Pricing page (to explore and see if there is enough interest in them as Logos books to pre-pub them) come from page scans that the book scanner made.

Don’t worry, we’re getting to the crocodiles. And the mummies. Actually, we’ll be getting to crocodile mummies.

Really! Just please be patient; there’s a lot of background to go through first.

But we do something else with these images. We have all of the books we’ve scanned up on a subscription service (targeted toward college/seminary use by students and faculty) called What is Here’s the about blurb: is the perfect desktop companion to your present Bible software and print library. is a good place to go for the books you don’t already own in print or digital form. Think of as a collection of over 6200 8000 books you would love to have access to but are not likely to purchase or keep at your finger tips. These are the books for which you would plan a trip to the library or the books you would look up on microfiche. These are the valuable, but less frequently used books. They are too valuable to take out of circulation but too costly to reprint. These are the books that cause institutions to build large buildings just to house these titles for future generations. Unless you live near a large seminary library, you are probably not even aware of most of these titles and will never have an opportunity to view them or use them, until now.

I poke around with some frequency. (Here’s a recent example of other content I found in
I did some “poking around” awhile back, looking further into what kind of papyrological resources were available in the library. I just searched for where “papyri” occurred in book metadata (title, subjects, etc.). Yes, this is all “rabbit trail” stuff; but I still think it’s pretty cool, and a pretty decent example of Facilitating Serendipitous Discovery. Here’s what happened:

  1. Search for “papyri”.
  2. Come across the Tebtunis Papyri volume. Cool! Read the front matter. Realize that these are papyrus fragments retrieved from cartonage of crocodile mummies! (really, see a picture of them!)
  3. Still paging through book on Wow, there’s a fragment from Homer’s Iliad (Book II) that was stuffed in crocodile mummy cartonage? Check it out:
  4. Search Google for more info on “Tebtunis”.
  5. Come across The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri at the Bancroft Library at Berkeley.
  6. View the webcast “Ancient Egypt and the Tebtunis Papyri” (look for item at 2:20 PM) and learn even more.
  7. Poke around Tebtunis Papyri site. Whoa, this stuff is catalogued in APIS! (Advanced Paprylogical Information System). That means you can search the catalogue!
  8. Search the APIS catalogue for where ‘Homer’ occurs in APIS items associated with Berkeley. There are 24 entries from Berkeley that reference ‘Homer’. Some have images. Here’s one that is pretty cool and actually has rather readable images.
  9. Even cooler: Here’s the catalogue entry for the item referred to above (P.Tebt.1.004) which aligns with the volume/numbering in Grenfell & Hunt’s volume. From here view images of the papyri themselves! (Make sure to zoom in to see the lettering)

Admittedly, this is a bit of a rabbit trail. But I thought it was interesting, and that it showed some of the usability of Hopefully you’ve enjoyed the serendipity and perhaps have learned a few things to boot (Crocodile mummies? Yes!).
But all of this going-on about crocodile mummies really does have some applicability to Biblical Studies. One of the Tebtunis Papyri (P.Tebt.703) has some relevance to New Testament epistlography; particularly when considering the genre of First Timothy and Titus. I blog more about that over on Had I not explored the papyrological resources and dug a bit more into what the Tebtunis Papyri were all about, the references to P.Tebt.703 in several of the recent commentaries on the Pastoral Epistles (Witherington, Towner, L.T. Johnson) and introductions (Carson & Moo, plus Thielmann’s NT Theology volume) would’ve fallen on deaf (or at least somewhat hard-of-hearing) ears.
Don’t worry, I’ll return to blogging about stuff like Greek syntax shortly.

Bible Reading Plans for 2008

It’s officially a new year—at least for most countries—and that means a new opportunity to start fresh in your Bible reading. No matter what your goals are for this year, Logos Bible Software can help you read your Bible more faithfully—and give you quick and convenient access to tools that will help you understand it better and apply it more consistently.
There are at least three ways that Logos can help you plan for your Bible reading this year.
1. Use Logos to Create a Bible Reading Plan
Logos Bible Software has a built-in tool that allows you to create customized Bible reading plans. To create a new Bible reading plan, click File > New > Bible Reading Plan. Give it a name like Bible Reading Plan 2008 or My Bible Reading Plan and click OK.
Select Your Range
The first step is to choose what portion of the Bible you’d like to read. The predefined options are:

  • Bible
  • Old Testament
  • New Testament
  • Old and New Testament Each Session
  • Old and New Testament, Psalms and Proverbs Each Session
  • Old and New Testament, Psalms and Daily Proverb Each Session

We also allow you to customize your own range. Choose Special from the Presets drop down menu, and enter a range like Genesis-Deuteronomy, Matthew-Acts, or Romans-Philemon (for multiple readings each day, separate the ranges with | [e.g., Genesis-Deuteronomy | Matthew-Acts]). If you struggled last year because you felt like you were reading more than you could keep up with or digest, you might want to set a smaller goal this year. It’s better to read less with comprehension and meditation than more if it means you’ll (1) give up because you can’t keep up or (2) perhaps worse—read mindlessly just so you can check off your list.
Select Your Version
The next step is to choose a version to read. All of your unlocked versions are listed in the drop down menu. Choose the one that you’d like to read this year. It might be best to choose a version that you have never read before. I remember the first time I read through the Bible in a new version; things stood out to me that I had previously read right over because of familiarity.
Select Your Schedule
Next, decide what days you’d like to read. You can schedule your readings for every day, only weekdays, once a week, or a special frequency of your choosing. Then decide when you’d like your plan to start and end. It can be specific dates, a certain number of weeks, a certain number of sessions, or a certain number of verses per session.
Select Boundary Breaks
You can select whether the reading plan should end at the end of chapters or at the end of pericopes (i.e., paragraphs or sections). Choosing pericopes will result in more consistent reading lengths and often more logical breaking points.
Create as many reading plans as you’d like: one for each member of your family or one for your English Bible reading, another for your Greek reading, and another for Hebrew. Reading a couple verses a day or a week in the Hebrew OT and Greek NT is a great way to keep develop your language skills or keep them sharp.
All of your new reading plans will appear on your home page. If you don’t use the home page, you can view your reading plan by going to File > Open > Bible Reading Plans and selecting the appropriate plan.
For more information, watch our video on how to set up a Bible reading plan.
2. Use Addins and Resources for Bible Reading and Devotions
Built into all of our base collections (except Original Languages Library) is a Lectionary Viewer. You can access it from Tools > Bible Data > Lectionary Viewer. You can also choose to have the lectionary appear on your Logos home page. Open the Logos home page (Go > Home > Logos Bible Software), click Customize View, scroll down to Lectionary, and check the appropriate boxes. We include The Revised Common Lectionary and The United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. If you are in a tradition that follows the lectionary, this will allow you to keep up with the current week’s readings.
We also have a few lectionary resources you may want to consider adding to your library:

If you know XML, you can even create your own lectionary.
For more information, watch our Lectionary Viewer video.
The M’Cheyne Bible Reading Plan
In For the Love of God, Volumes One and Two, Dr. D. A. Carson gives the M’Cheyne chart of daily Bible readings, which covers the New Testament and Psalms twice and the rest of the Bible once. There are four readings per day: two for family reading and two for personal reading. Each day’s reading features reflective comments from Dr. Carson. Both volumes cover the same reading schedule, but the comments are different allowing you to following this program and read Dr. Carson’s reflections for two consecutive years.
There are more than 50 devotional books in Logos that have daily readings to help you meditate on God’s Word. To find them, open the Logos home page (Go > Home > Logos Bible Software), click Customize View, and scroll down to Devotions. This will display all of the devotional books that you currently own. Check the box next to any book that you’d like to appear on your home page each day.
3. Try the Global Bible Reader Beta 1
We just launched beta testing for a brand new tool that allows you to read the Bible along with Christians all over the world. It has a very nice look and feel, and we’re sure you’ll enjoy using it. Currently, you have the choice of two versions: the KJV and the ESV. We are looking into adding others. You can also click an icon that will open the passage up for you in Libronix allowing you to dig further into the meaning of the passage.
At present there are three reading plans available:

  • Bible in a Year
  • Gospel of John in a Month
  • New Testament in Six Months

You can participate in any or all of them. We’re considering creating others or even allowing you to create your own to use with family and friends. You can interact on the current day’s passage by leaving comments and reading the comments of others.
Remember, this is a beta product, which means it is likely to have some bugs. We do not recommend trying this unless you are comfortable testing beta software.

To find out more and download the Global Bible Reader visit
Update: Bruce asked if we had a chronological Bible reading plan. We do. You can download it here. Put the file in \My Documents\Libronix DLS\BibleReadingPlans.