Fresh Blog Posts, Delivered to Your Email Inbox

I realize I’m inviting criticism by offering another way to increase the amount of email you receive from Logos so close on the heels of my Sipping from a Firehose post…but here goes.

We recently added a way for you, the Logos Blog reader, to sign up to receive new blog posts directly to your email inbox.

Some will argue that this defeats the whole purpose of RSS feeds and they’re right. I also know that plenty of people enjoy reading the Logos Blog yet have no interest in learning how RSS feeds work even if it’s super simple. They mastered email a long time ago and it works just fine, thank you very much.

If you’re one of those people and you want the latest Logos Blog post to be delivered to your email inbox without you having to think about it…just use the simple sign-up mechanism in the right-hand column of the main Logos Blog page. It looks like this:




And once you’re all signed up, every time we post to the Logos Blog (more or less 5x per week), the content of the post will appear “automagically” in your inbox, looking something like this:


New sales jobs in eight cities!

Knocking On DoorI wish that we could show Logos Bible Software to every Bible student in the world. Because when people who are serious about getting into the Word see how Logos Bible Software enhances their study, they can’t wait to use it.

We try to show Logos in as many ways as we can. We put demo videos on the web, we present at conferences, and we even show it to seat-mates on airplanes. About the only thing we don’t do is go door-to-door.

But we’re ready to try that, too.

We are going to launch a national sales force of Field Representatives: full-time Logos employees who visit pastors and Bible students in eight large cities around the country, showing people how Logos Bible Software helps them do better, deeper Bible study while wasting less time finding things and flipping paper pages.

Are you a salesperson looking for a product you can sell without reservation? Please take a look at the job description, and please feel free to forward it to anyone you know who might be interested.

Our first openings will be in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Seattle, and Washington, DC.

Sipping from a Firehose

I love being a dad and one of my favorite moments every day is when I get home after work and my daughters, aged 2 and 4, run to the door with hugs and squeals of delight. Makes a guy feel like a hero.

It can also be a bit overwhelming, as the girls often try to outdo one another in relating the news of the day. There’s just so much to tell and all of it is highly important.

As we attempt to convey all the stuff that’s happening at Logos I sometimes feel like my daughters. We have so much to communicate and everything is important, at least to some slice of our constituents. Though we do try to keep the squealing to a minimum.

There’s certainly a risk ofinflicting information overload.But even with the blog, NewsWire, newsgroups, and alerts within Libronixwe often have to leave things unsaid.

A classic example: with the massive influx of new prepublication titles it’s easyto lose track ofwhat’s been added to the prepublication page. That means eager customers who pre-order a title may wait longer for the title to gain enough support to move into production. Many of these titles would go straight into production if we could just deliver the message to allthe interested people (without swamping everyone else).

Announcing…Special Interest Lists

The NewsWire email service will always remain the best way to stay current on the latest sales, specials, and new products from Logos. It’s for everyone and if you pay attention to nothing else from us, you should be sure to open NewsWire when it hits your inbox.

But now you canreceive additional announcements in areas of special interest. The four newemail lists described below will ensure that you’re hearing about the titles that are most important to you.

We also hope that opening up this new communication channel will prevent some of the more “niche” titles from getting lost in the shuffle, giving them an extra boost and moving them into production more directly.

The four new lists you can subscribe to are:

  • Greek Interest – News, product announcements, and updates for those who work with the Greek language.
  • Hebrew Interest – Ditto, but for Hebrew.
  • Other Ancient Languages Interest – Ditto, but for “other ancient languages” such as Aramaic, Latin, Syriac, Coptic, Ugaritic, Armenian, Georgian, Gothic, Ethiopic, Old Church Slavonic.
  • Academic Interest – This list is not related to the academic purchase program. It’s for people who have a strong interest in scholarly books that tend to interact heavily with the literature of biblical studies.For example, theLibrary of NT Studies: JSNTS on Paulor Barth’s Church Dogmatics.

We haven’t sent the first mailing to any of these lists yet, but you can sign up now and get in from the beginning. If you don’t find it to be useful, you can always unsubscribe later.

Hint: Be sure to follow all the steps below, as these are double opt-in lists.

Sign Up Now!

  1. Visit your My Subscriptions page at Logos.com to view and subscribe to available email lists. (You can always get there again later from My Account, linked at the top-right corner of the website.)
  2. Check the box next to each subscription you want to receive.
  3. Click the “Update Subscriptions” button at the bottom. Your computer will think for a few seconds as the server subscribes/unsubscribes you appropriately.
  4. Important:at this point, a Confirm button appears. You’re not subscribed until you click Confirm!(Note: The Macintosh Interest list requires separate confirmation.)
  5. Once you’ve confirmed your subscription(s), the My Subscriptions page will show a checkmark by each mailing you’ll receive. The list manager will send you another email letting you know you’re subscribed and confirmed.

Logos Expands Again

The last week of December saw another shuffle at our Bellingham offices. Hopefully it was all transparent to you, the customer, but about half of us moved our desks to a different location. The growing Design & Editorial department moved across the building, salespeople were all shuffled,and the entire support team moved from 1313 Commercial to a building two doors down the block (the space briefly occupied by Room2Think).

Why all the moves and why should you care? One word: growth.

Recent hiring and planned expansion for 2007 put us at max capacity. To continue to expand our operation, take on new data projects, launch new sales and marketing programs…we had to open up new space to put people.

If you’re a Logos customer, growth is good news.It means more new books, ground-breaking databases, innovative products, and continued excellence in service and support. 2006 was a record year and we look forward to what 2007 holds!

Keep in mind…if you or someone you know is bright, talented, passionate about the Bible, and looking for work…be sure tokeep an eye on our jobs page. Logos is a great place to work and Bellingham is a great place to live!

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More photos at the LogosBibleOffice Flickr page…

Introducing…The Logos Lecture Series

Today’s guest blogger is Mark VanDyke, who works in marketing at Logos.
Do you ever miss your college or seminary days, when you went from class to class hearing lectures on a seemingly endless array of topics?

Now we are sharing access to some of North America’s top scholars through a new community event called the Logos Bible Software Lecture Series.

These presentations will all be free and open to the public, and are designed to be interesting and accessible to a broad audience.

The inaugural Lecture Series event will feature widely acclaimed speaker, Dr. Peter Flint of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute at Trinity Western University. Dr. Flint’s lecture will focus on how the scrolls have affected modern biblical translation. The event will be held at Bellingham’s iconic Mount Baker Theatre at

7:00 PM on Wednesday, January 10.
We expect to host a lecture every couple of months and prospective topics range from ancient text analyses to cutting-edge technologies that can be applied to biblical studies.

One of the reasons we’re excited about the event is that we always look forward to meeting our customers. It gives us a chance to learn about our users’ interests and events like this also demonstrate our dedication at Logos for helping people understand the Bible in new and exciting ways.

The Case for an E-Library

The forthcoming issue of Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal includes an extensive (3,400+ word!) review of Scholar’s Library: Gold – Logos Bible Software 3. We received permission to post the review at Logos.com in advance of publication, so you can read the whole thing and even download the PDF.

Every reviewer puts a unique spin on his analysis. This reviewer, Andrew Naselli—who is at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School working on his second Ph.D.—does a great job of answering tough questions that a prospective buyer might ask before deciding to build an electronic library. These are questions Naselli struggled with before deciding to invest in Logos, so his responses are thoughtful and genuine.

  • Should I Buy E-Books From Only One or Multiple Software Companies?
  • Will New Technology Make Current E-Books Obsolete?
  • What if the Software Company Goes Out of Business?
  • Are E-Books Riskier Than Print Books?
  • How Is an E-Library Superior to a Print Library?
  • How does Scholar’s Library: Gold Compare to Other Products?

I’ll conclude with one of my favorite quotations from the review just to pique your interest. To the question of whether owning electronic books is “risky,” Naselli responds:

Some think that print books are safer investments than e-books. However, building any kind of library— whether print or electronic—involves some degree of risk. Print books are arguably a more risky investment than some e-books since print books are in danger of theft, natural disasters, and wear and tear from usage. A few years ago one pastor loaded up all of his earthly possessions, including his print library, into a moving truck, which was stolen the very next day. If that pastor had an e-library of Logos Bible Software, he would have received his entire e-library back for free.

Related posts:

Logos Bible Software as a “Dialogical Study Bible”

One of theSBL sessions in November was entitled “Biblical Studies and Study Bibles” and looked at the issues surrounding study Bibles. You know, the printed Bibles that include study notes next to the biblical text and are often marketed to a particular audience, e.g., men, women, students, skaters, etc.

One of the professors involved in the session—Carol Newsom from the Candler School of Theology—wrote an article about study Bibles for the SBL Forum in advance of the society’s annual conference.

Newsom, who haswritten for and edited study Bibles,believes there’s a place for them:

The biblical text is not self interpreting, and there are all kinds of things that readers need help with. Who or what is “Hepzibah?” or “Mene, mene, tekel, u-parsin”?

But she worries about the trend toward niche marketing and the lack of varying perspectives in a highly targeted study Bible. Her solution?

If I were to envision the “best practices” that might evolve from the phenomenon of diverse study bibles, it would be something that our new internet technologies might make possible-a kind of high tech, inter-religious “miqra’ot gedalot.” I would love to assemble for my students a biblical text surrounded by (at least) four kinds of commentary — mainline protestant, evangelical protestant, Catholic, and Jewish. Or one could construct a similar dialogical volume constructed around North American, Eastern Orthodox, Latin American, African, and Asian Christian perspectives. A Jewish seminary might construct a quite different assemblage of traditional and contemporary Jewish annotations. As one can imagine, the possibilities are truly endless.

I read this and thought to myself, “She’s describing the Libronix DLS!”A few minutes later, I’d slapped together a workspace all set up to study the “Mene, mene, tekel, u-parsin” passage in Daniel 5.

If you click the thumbnail image above, you’ll see a “dialogical studydesk” that I’ve created using only books that are available today. Starting at the top left…the Bible version is Tanakh (it’s the one Newsom has her students use), with the NRSV on a tab as an alternate. Surrounding that are commentaries in the categories Newsom suggests: mainline protestant (Hermeneia), evangelical protestant (New American), and Catholic (Collegeville). Our “JPS Bible and Torah Commentary Collection” is still under development but I’d expect it to be released sometime in 2007.

At the far right side of the screen, I’ve got open a few select referencevolumes:the IVP Bible Background Commentary and Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary, with A Dictionary of Biblical Tradition in English Literature and Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament on tabs.

Various other titles could be substituted for the ones I chose here. (See, for example,our commentary guideand list of Bible dictionaries.)

And, of course, a workspace like this includes all the little conveniences you’ve come to expect from Logos Bible Software: resources that scroll together, dynamic linking to instantly and effortlessly look up an unfamiliarword in any language, Bible reference expansion upon hover, automatic footnoting, and so on.

But I think you get the point…

“Professor Newsom, the futureis now!”

Building Our Team

It is always interesting to read about how other people are applying information technology to Bible study.

SemanticBible.org is the home of a variety of interesting projects, and earlier this year it occurred to me that whoever was behind it must be the kind of person who is interested in many of the same things we are.

And he is.

I am very happy that Sean Boisen has accepted our invitation to join Logos Bible Software as a Senior Information Architect, and I am looking forward to working with him on increasingly powerful (and interesting!) ways of using technology to facilitate Bible study.

You may find Sean’s blog post interesting, and poking around SemanticBible.org is always thought-provoking.

Christmas Cheer and Festivities

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All work and no play makes for a gloomy office…especially around Christmas. So here are some highlights of our play during the past few weeks.

This year’s office decorating contest was a battle of the grinches with two departments independently hitting upon a “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” theme.

The text developers ultimately triumphed (they not only decorated but also put on a performance for the judges, complete with a 6 or 8 member choir).Andthere was a strong showing from a number of other departments and individuals as well. (See more photos...)

Of course there were some scrooges who didn’t decorate at all.

The annual bake-off was a sweet success, with nearly a dozen entries to spoil our collective appetite for lunch. For some of us, the baked treatswere lunch.

First place went to Ryan Husser,Logos book designer, with his Magic Cookie Bars. Second and third place went to Kelsey Sebens’ peanut butter bars and James VanNoord’s “O Little Mint of Bellingham” bars, respectively. Two of the recipes are below.

The Logos Christmas Party was a great chance to fellowship with one another, meet spouses and “significant others”, and even meet some co-workers for the first time.

Bob told us the story of the first ever company Christmas party, held in a stairwell at the Oak Harbor office,with a menu that included Oscar Meyer cold cut and Wonder Bread sandwiches. It was pretty amazing to look around atthe largest Logos Christmas party to dateand be thankful for the ways God has blessed this company.

We hope you have a merry Christmas and look forward to serving you in the New Year!


Magic Cookies Bars

Ingredients: 1 stick (½ cup) butter 1 ½ cup crushed graham crackers (sandwiching between two pieces of waxed paper works best for me) 1 can sweetened condensed milk 1 cup (6 oz) chocolate chips 1 cup (6 oz) butterscotch chips 1 1/3 cup coconut flakes 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions: Preheat oven to 350° Melt butter in 13 x 9 inch pan Sprinkle graham cracker crumbs onto butter, shake pan gently to disperse evenly Drizzle sweetened condensed milk evenly over butter/graham cracker crumbs Sprinkle chocolate chips, then butterscotch chips, then coconut, then walnuts (if desired) over sweetened condensed milk Bake for 25 minutes Let cool and cut into pieces

O Little Mint of Bellingham(Creamy Mint Bars )

Recipe from Genny Gerrits; Holland, MI; April 1996Grease 9×13 pan. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Base/Crust:1 Chocolate Mint Pillsbury Cake mixor 1 double chocolate pudding cake mix plus 1 teaspoon mint extract 1/3 cup softened margarine1 egg1/4 cup waterCombine all ingredients and mix at low speed. Press into greased pan and bake for 10 minutes in preheated oven. Allow to cool.

Filling:1 envelope unflavored Knox gelatin. Sprinkle on 1/4 cup cold water and heat according to package directions to dissolve gelatin. 4 cups powdered sugar, divided1/2 cup margarine1/2 cup Crisco or butter flavored shortening1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract2 to 5 drops green food coloringAfter gelatin is dissolved, allow to cool. Mix soft gelatin with 2 cups of powdered sugar, margarine, shortening, flavoring and coloring. Beat one minute at medium speed or until creamy. Blend in balance of sugar. Spread over crust.

Frosting:6 oz milk chocolate chips3 T shorteningMelt chips and shortening and drizzle over filling. Refrigerate.

Notes:– The base/crust is very thick and sticky. It will probably take longer than 10 minutes to be done.– I doubled this recipe for the bake-off and used a 18×13 half sheet pan– I substituted butter one-for-one in place of margarine.

Logos Culinary Secrets Revealed!

As Bob has mentioned and as regular blog readers know, from time to time we love to do some cookin’ here at Logos.


Bradley Grainger preparing some condimentsfor his 2006 Curry Cook-off entry

When we have cookoffs, we usually post winning recipes on this blog.

If you’re interested in some of the winners, try searching the blog using the search box on the sidebar for the word recipe. Or just click this link.

Who knows, you could find something you’d like to make for dinner next week!