Rejoice Always, Pray Constantly, Give Thanks in Everything

 

This post is the fifth in a series adapted from Anticipating His Arrival, a family Advent devotional by Rick Brannan. We will be posting one devotional a day through Christmas. [Read more…]

When Our Mouths Were Filled with Laughter

This post is the third in a series adapted from Anticipating His Arrival, a family Advent devotional by Rick Brannan. We will be posting one devotional a day through Christmas. [Read more…]

Excerpt from the Award-Winning Lexham Geographic Commentary

Each year, Christianity Today honors outstanding books most likely to shape evangelical life, thought, and culture.

The Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Gospels, edited by Barry Beitzel, recently received this prestigious award for the category of Biblical Studies. The commentary delivers fresh insight by paying attention to an often overlooked component of the Gospel stories—their geographical setting.

Most houses (be they of a commoner or a king) had a guest–room or lodging place (katalyma) where a traveler could pause to eat or sleep for a period of time.

This excerpt explores—and challenges—the traditional understanding of the location of Jesus’ birth. [Read more…]

See How All Major Doctrines Relate to Each Other

The new Theology Guide in Logos 8 will do something most people consider it impossible to do: it will change theologians’ minds.

Theologians have long known that Logos is a good tool for the study of Scripture, but to some of them that’s all it was. Now, theologians, Logos can guide your studies, too.

Search for “Image of God,” for example, in the new Theology Guide, and you’ll get quick access to all the major tools of the Lexham Survey of Theology—and there’s a lot of them.

Let me explain how they work.

[Read more…]

How to Use the Important Passages Feature in Logos 8

Usually when we’re studying a passage we like to explore cross-references related to that passage. For example, imagine we’re camped out in Luke 4:1 which states Jesus was full of the Holy Spirit, led by the Holy Spirit, and tempted by the devil. During our research, we may want to read other passages about Spirit fullness or guidance or temptation. Typically, however, we have to look up the cross-reference to see what it’s about.

That’s about to change with a new feature in Logos 8 called Important Passages. This Guide section not only lists a cross-reference but also tells us why it’s a cross-reference in the first place! [Read more…]

Logos 8 Is Here—Watch the Trailer

Watch the video on Logos.com/8

Something powerful happens when we study the Bible for ourselves. Familiar stories become richer, old truths more meaningful, and new discoveries change our lives. And at Faithlife, we want you to experience that for yourself.

That’s why when we made Logos Bible Software 8, we challenged ourselves to create new ways for you to take the next step in your Bible study, whether you’re a Bible scholar or are just beginning to study the Bible for yourself.

And that meant making Logos easier to use than ever.

Watch the trailer to see what’s new in Logos 8.

The New Logos Is Here

Something powerful happens when we study the Bible for ourselves. Familiar stories become richer, old truths more meaningful, and new discoveries change our lives. And at Faithlife, we want you to experience that for yourself.

That’s why when we made Logos Bible Software 8, we challenged ourselves to create new ways for you to take the next step in your Bible study, whether you’re a Bible scholar or are just beginning to study the Bible for yourself.

And that meant making Logos easier to use than ever.  

[Read more…]

Bring Your Sermons to Life with These Massive Collections

What was the secret of Spurgeon’s most powerful sermons? While the Holy Spirit is the source of true power behind any preacher’s sermon, there’s a craft to sermon writing—and Spurgeon mastered it. And more than anything else, Spurgeon mastered the art of the perfectly placed and eloquently delivered illustration.

With The Biblical Illustrator Collections for the Old Testament (28 vols.) and New Testament (30 vols.)—both currently on Community Pricing—you’ll glean verse-by-verse insights from respected preachers such as Augustine, J.C. Ryle, Charles Spurgeon, and D.L. Moody.

The collections together:

  • Cover the entire Bible
  • Provide commentary, illustrations, application, and outline suggestions
  • Include contributions from celebrated preachers and theologians from throughout church history

Plus, when you add these to your Logos library, you’ll be able to consult The Biblical Illustrator alongside your preferred Bible translation and other commentaries while writing your sermon using the Sermon Editor. Open Logos’ Sermon Starter Guide or the Passage Guide to find sermon outlines, supporting quotes, or illustration ideas from The Biblical Illustrator and other Logos resources. Or use Logos’ in-depth search to find correlating ideas or illustrations on the passage or topic you’re studying.

These resources are on Community Pricing, so you can place a bid for what you’d like to pay for the Old Testament and New Testament collections. With Community Pricing, your bids tell us what you want to become a new resource in Logos, and when your favorite resources get fully funded, you get a great deal on classic works. Learn more about how Community Pricing works here.

Place your Community Pricing bid on The Biblical Illustrator: Old Testament Collection (28 vols.) and The Biblical Illustrator: New Testament Collection (30 vols.), and save when these come out!

Why Bother Learning about Angels? Michael Heiser Answers

What the Bible really says about angels is often overlooked or filtered through popular myths. Whatever you think you know about angels, there’s a good chance it’s wrong.

But why does that matter? Is a more accurate understanding of God’s heavenly host relevant for Christians today?

In his new book, Angels, Michael Heiser tackles these misconceptions head on. He grounds his study in the biblical context. In this excerpt, Heiser shows us why a correct understanding of angels is important in a correct understanding of God and his creation.

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Popular interest in angels and angel stories is high, which is symptomatic of our culture’s insatiable appetite for the supernatural. It seems every other movie or television show features a paranormal theme, alien superheroes, or some mischievous or malevolent deity. Bookstore shelves are well stocked with books about aliens, preternatural creatures, and, of course, angels and demons. That wouldn’t be the case if they didn’t sell, but sell they do. Unfortunately, the content isn’t very biblical, even when it tries.

Much of what Christians think they know about angels is more informed by Christian tradition than Scripture. The angelology of Christian tradition is, to say the least, quite incomplete and, in some ways, inaccurate.

But why should we care about angels?

Because angelology helps us think more clearly about familiar points of biblical theology. God’s supernatural family is a theological template for understanding God’s relationship to his human family of believers—and our greater importance compared to them. Learning what the Bible says about angels ultimately is tied to thinking well about how God thinks about us. What God wants us to know about angels contributes to our eternal perspective.

In our discussion of Old Testament angelology, I’ll draw your attention to the plural language of Genesis 1:26 (“let us make humankind in our image,” LEB). That language isn’t a cryptic reference to the Trinity. God is speaking to his heavenly host. He is sharing a decision with them—decreeing his will, as it were. If he were speaking to the members of the Trinity, they would already know what’s in God’s mind, because they are coequal and coeternal with him. Instead, the plural language of Genesis 1:26 intentionally connects humanity, God, and the members of the heavenly host with respect to an important biblical concept: imaging God. Imaging God is about representation—acting on God’s behalf at his behest. Humans image God on earth. The heavenly host images God in the spiritual, non-terrestrial world. The two are connected by design—and that has amazing ramifications.

Humans were tasked to make the whole world like Eden: a place where God’s goodness was known and his presence experienced; where humanity’s needs were met and God’s created world could be fully known and enjoyed; where imagers related to each other the way God related to them, with joy and love. God intended humanity to finish a task he had begun. He wanted participation—and that should sound familiar if one is familiar with the heavenly host, God’s initial family.

Understanding this status provides an answer to questions like, “How should we then live?,” “How do we image God?,” and “How should we see and treat each other?” We image God by doing what he would do, when he would do it, and with the motivation he would have for doing it. Yes, we are lesser than God and will fail. But God forgives—another lesson on what imaging means. We image God when we imitate God, acting on his behalf. It’s difficult to see how any facet of this could be deemed impractical for Christian living.

You may not have realized it while you were reading, but we just thought theologically, by means of an insight about God’s heavenly host. Believe it or not, the significant, practical idea of imaging God extended from a more insightful angelology—drawn from the plurals of Genesis 1:26, where God speaks to his heavenly host. That insight helped us think about practical holy living. Surprise!

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Discover what the Bible really says about angels and start thinking theologically about God’s heavenly host. Get Angels today!

Get 46 Commentary Volumes in One Affordable Bundle

No single commentary can answer all your questions. So when you have access to multiple commentaries, you get a range of interpretations from unique perspectives—from different people with different backgrounds—that can thoroughly answer your questions and give you a solid understanding of the text. [Read more…]