Black History Is Family History

Image courtesy of Faithlife Media


When you open a book about Church history, what do you expect to find in its pages?

Are you expecting to learn about the history of the creeds and the Great Schism? How about the Reformation and the Puritan emigration to North America? [Read more…]

How a British ‘Master Spy’ Saved Thousands of Jews in the Holocaust

Today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 75th anniversary of the Jewish liberation from Auschwitz. Despite the horrors that occurred at Auschwitz and other concentration camps, thousands of Jewish lives were spared because of the covert operations of unsung heroes. One such man was Francis “Frank” Foley. [Read more…]

The Gifts of the Magi and the Threefold Role of Christ

Hilary of Poitiers (around AD 315–367/8) became bishop of Poitiers, in western France, in AD 350. Soon after, he was drawn into disputes over Arianism, the heretical teaching that Jesus was created by God the Father. Hilary was condemned in 356 and exiled for four years to Phrygia (a region of modern-day Turkey). During that exile, he argued against Arianism at the Council of Seleucia. 1 The clarity of his theological understanding has made him one of the most widely respected Latin theologians. [Read more…]

Why Protestants Need to Talk More about Mary

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By Amy Peeler

“A class on Mary called ‘Mother of God’? At a Protestant school?” My admission that I teach such a class arouses incredulity, because not many transgress the ecumenical divide. Reflections on Mary have remained robust for millennia, but not in all Christian circles (mine included).  [Read more…]

4 Pastors Who Led and Loved Their Churches Well

The Bible establishes specific qualifications for pastors (see 1 Pet 5:3, 1 Tim 3:2–7, Titus 1:8, Eph 6:4). But above all, they are to “set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity” (1 Tim. 4:12)—a tall responsibility.

Today is Pastor Appreciation Day, and to honor the work pastors do for the sake of the gospel, we’re sharing about four pastors who lived out 1 Timothy 4:12 and loved God’s people well. [Read more…]

6 Facts You Might Not Know about Martin Luther’s 95 Theses

95 theses

An obscure monk hammers a list of grievances onto the doors of a church: what could be more revolutionary—or more symbolic of the Protestant Reformation—than that?

But when Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg Church door on October 31, 1517, he wasn’t launching a fully formed movement in a single act; he was giving voice to ideas that had been brewing in Christendom for years. Though many Christians see that act as the launch of the Protestant Reformation, the truth is a little more complicated.

Here are six facts you probably didn’t know about Martin Luther and his 95 theses, all drawn from Dr. Jennifer McNutt’s Mobile Ed course Milestones of the Protestant Reformation. [Read more…]