When the New York Times and Billy Graham Agreed on Theology

The most important work of evangelical theology in modern times.

— Kenneth Briggs, New York Times

Establishes [Carl] Henry as the leading theologian of the nation’s evangelical flank.

— Richard Ostling, Time Magazine [Read more…]

Outer Edges: Who Are You Forgetting in Your Sermons?

Most preaching is aimed at the people in the middle. How do we preach so people on the edges can feast, too?

By Patricia Batten

I preached on five verses in the first chapter of Mark’s Gospel. In verses 40–45, Mark tells us about a man who lived on the outer edges of society. [Read more…]

What Is Repentance? A Moving Description by Charles Octavius Boothe

By repentance is meant a true godly sorrow for sin; that is, a sorrow which arises from the understanding that sin, in its worst forms, is an act of disobedience or of positive enmity to God, who demands our best obedience, and who is worthy to be loved by all men with all their heart and soul and might and mind and strength. But Paul says: [Read more…]

June’s Free Course: John Frame on Scripture

This month, pick up your free Mobile Ed course by John Frame: TH207 The Clarity of Scripture. [Read more…]

How to Use Sermon Archives like Commentaries in Logos

Did you know sermons function much like commentaries in Logos?

This post will show you how to get the most use out of sermon collections in Logos. For a limited time, several sermon archives are 30% off, so take a look at the sale if you’d like to add more sermons to your library. [Read more…]

10 Quotes on the Christian Life from John Stott

Nearly 50 years ago, the evangelical church was on the brink of shirking the call to global missions.

As framer of the Lausanne Covenant in 1974, John R. W. Stott (1921–2011), an Anglican priest, was on the forefront of the movement to preserve modern missions endeavors. He founded the Langham Partnership to equip churches with biblical resources and training for global missions. [Read more…]

Grab May’s Free Book before It Gets Replaced

May’s almost over, which means A Critical Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles moves over for June’s free book and goes back to full price.

So grab it now, plus two more commentaries for just $5: [Read more…]

A Commentary for the Most Neglected Part of Your Sermon

Every preacher knows it’s easy to explain a text without moving into theological reflection. It’s even easier to stop short of application.

Yet no sermon is complete without it.

The Treasures of Scripture commentary series (65 vols.), currently half-off on Pre-Pub, is designed especially for this crucial part of the sermon.

A preacher’s commentary

The Treasures of Scripture is truly a preacher’s commentary. It contains:

  • Historical information
  • Alliterated outlines
  • Topical studies
  • Original language word studies
  • Sermon illustrations.

For example, here’s a potent illustration on fearing God, taken from the Job volume:

Charlemagne, it is said, gave instructions to be buried in the royal posture of a king upon his throne, with the Gospels opened on his knees, his sword beside him, and his crown upon his head. When his tomb was later uncovered, there he was. The crown was still perched on his skull, and a bony finger rested on these words: “What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul?”

What an image, and how easy it would be to launch from it into a charge to keep watch over our souls. Though Job had king-like wealth and stature, he feared God. Job, and apparently, Charlemagne, understood that the fear of God and the eternal destiny of our souls were more important than the praise of man or wealth of this world. Flesh may fail, but the word of the Lord stands forever.

The Treasures of Scripture is full of powerful illustrations, not to mention outlines, alliterative helps, and other commentary to aid in preparing for preaching.

What preachers say about it

The commentary is also edifying in its own right. Here is what some pastors and preachers say about it:

“This is excellent material. It is probably the most practical material for sermon preparation of anyone that I have read. I highly recommend it for pastors.”
— Roy Edgemon, former director of discipleship and family ministries, LifeWay Christian Resources

“The books are some of the best material I’ve read and studied. They fed me. It has been a joy and blessing to study these books.”
— Mike Oldham, pastor, Central Baptist Temple, Sanford, North Carolina

“I never thought the presentation of truth could be as practical, clear, timely, and satisfying. The books are like a prepared meal ready to eat.”
— David Tandoc, pastor, Dagapapn City, Philippines

Explore this well-loved pastoral resource, and get it now while it’s half off. The more interest it gathers, the higher the price, so get in early.

Shop now.

Listening for God’s Voice with the Intent to Obey

Photo by Ilya Ilford on Unsplash

By Kevin Vanhoozer

This excerpt from Kevin Vanhoozer highlights the importance of not just hearing God’s voice but truly listening with the intent to obey what he says.

In perhaps the most famous Arabian Nights story, Aladdin discovers a magic lamp that, when rubbed, produces a genie who invariably responds, “Your wish is my command.” It is the classic response of a servant to his master: “To hear is to obey.”

But in real life, there is often a gap, sometimes a yawning chasm, between hearing and obeying. Not everyone is as fortunate as Aladdin: sometimes servants hear, and do half-heartedly; at other times, they hear and do not do at all. Jesus told his own equally compelling stories that illustrate the all-important difference between hearing and doing.

Unusual teaching

The Gospel of Mark introduces Jesus as a teacher who astonished his hearers, “for he taught them as one who had authority” (Mark 1:22). He taught in the synagogue and, later, offered free seaside lectures (Mark 2:13; 4:1). The form of Jesus’ teaching is significant: “And he was teaching them many things in parables” (Mark 4:2).

A parable is an extended metaphor (“the kingdom of God is like …”), a metaphorical narrative—a story in which something extraordinary happens that subverts the ordinary way people think about things.

The first such story Mark recounts is the parable of the sower, which is about different kinds of hearers, represented by the different kinds of soil on which the seed of God’s word falls. Even the disciples did not understand it at first, and this despite Jesus’ obvious hint at the end: “He who has ears to hear, let him hear” (Mark 4:9). The parable they are to hear is itself about hearing God’s word. In particular, the parable explains the kind of hearing Jesus is after: a hearing in which God’s word takes root in a singular and wonderful way. Indeed, this is the extraordinary element in the parable: that a word-seed can multiply its growth a hundredfold.

To hear rightly is to correctly grasp the content of Jesus’ teaching, namely, the strange new world of the kingdom of God.

— Kevin Vanhoozer

This is also a parable of the kingdom of God. Jesus subverts his hearers’ conventional picture of a kingdom as something that can be established by swords and soldiers. Jesus instead proclaims a kingdom established by the right reception of the gospel—the right kind of hearing—rather than military conquest.

Jesus’ parables of the kingdom challenge the prevailing social imaginaries of power, be it ancient Roman imperialism or present-day geopolitics. Jesus taught with authority precisely by announcing a new picture to live by. To hear rightly is to correctly grasp the content of Jesus’ teaching, namely, the strange new world of the kingdom of God.

Hearing God’s voice and obeying

One qualification for being a disciple of Jesus is to be able to follow Jesus’ stories. Yet hearing, even with understanding and apparent agreement, is not enough. Toward the end of his longest lesson, the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus makes an explicit contrast between hearing and doing: “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. … And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand” (Matt 7:24, 26).

True disciples must be hearers and doers of Jesus’ words. The Greek term for the rock on which one builds—bedrock—shows up again later in Matthew 16:18, where Jesus says he will build his church “on this bedrock.” In other words, he who would build Jesus’ church on a rock rather than sand must build it on the bedrock of Jesus’ words. This is confirmed in Luke’s Gospel where, just after the parable of the sower, Jesus says, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it” (Luke 8:21).

As rabbi or Master, Jesus did not want his followers simply to listen to his lessons and then continue living as before. To hear and not do is both to flout the authority of Jesus’ words and to flaunt oneself as lord. Moreover, to hear and not do is the opposite not only of obedience but also of learning. No one learns to swim or ride a bike simply by reading an instruction manual. Jesus desires followers who both listen and learn.

This post is adapted from chapter 3 of Hearers and Doers by Kevin J. Vanhoozer (Lexham Press, 2019).


What People Are Saying about the ICC Series—Now on Sale

The lauded International Critical Commentary Series (ICC) (62 vols.) is 40% off in May. As one of the most thorough critical commentaries around, this is a stellar deal.

Here’s what serious students of Scripture like you say about this renowned series. [Read more…]