September’s Top Picks: The Story of God Commentary, Books by Carson and Moo, and More

Bolster your theological and ministry studies with 15 in-depth research and pastoral ministry collections from Zondervan—all 40% off this month.  [Read more…]

Why We Can’t Care for ‘the Least of These’ without Prison Ministry

By David Instone-Brewer, adapted from Moral Questions of the Bible: Timeless Truth in a Changing World.

Prison is a great place to find Jesus. 

A friend of mine in Cambridge offered to work in a prison as a chaplain and found that prisoners were very receptive to the gospel. Of course, many were just as resistant as they were outside, but others were much more open. They didn’t need convincing that something was wrong with their lives, and they had plenty of time to think about the good news he shared with them. After some time, a significant number of people had become Christians, and the prison governor offered him a full-time paid post because he needed fewer guards in the wing he’d been working in.

Christians don’t only help those who are Christians or who might convert. The criterion isn’t whether they are interested in Jesus, but whether Jesus is interested in them.

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The One Thing You Can’t Get More of—and Why It Matters for Knowing Christ

This post is adapted from In Season and Out: Sermons for the Christian Year by David A. deSilva.

Paul, of course, was not just a seeker of Christ on Sundays. His passion for knowing Christ Jesus spilled all over his calendar. Granted, Paul was a bit of a fanatic when it came to knowing Jesus and making Jesus known, but nevertheless, let’s allow his example to challenge us.  [Read more…]

How to (Mis)Interpret Prophecy

The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem, David Roberts (1796–1864)

There’s no shortage of advice on how to interpret the Bible. One maxim that I’ve already mentioned advises, “When the plain sense makes sense, seek no other sense.” I’ve heard it quoted when it comes to biblical prophecy—encouraging people to interpret literally, at face value. Although that sounds like good advice, some New Testament writers didn’t get the memo. [Read more…]

What This Little-Known Social Theory Has to Do with Your Sermons

By Jeffrey Arthurs, adapted from Preaching Points: 55 Tips for Improving Your Pulpit Ministry.

Remember ERP: Estimated Relationship Potential. This is a social science theory from the field of interpersonal communication which demonstrates that when we meet someone we quickly form an estimate of the potential for a relationship. We start to calculate: What kind of relationship is possible here? What will the nature of our relationship be? Will it be a romantic relationship? Will it be an authoritative relationship? Maybe I want to avoid this person. [Read more…]

The Top-Ranked Bible Commentaries, All on Sale

Take up to 50% off the highest rated commentaries.

Whether it’s Carson’s John commentary or Waltke’s superb work on Proverbs, right now you can save on the top commentaries for literally every book of the Bible.  [Read more…]

Why Haddon Robinson Says Less Is More in Preaching

By Haddon Robinson, adapted from Preaching Points: 55 Tips for Improving Your Pulpit Ministry.

There is an old story that preachers tell: A man came to church one Sunday and the only person who was there, besides himself, was the preacher. The preacher was hesitant to preach his sermon to one man sitting in the front row, but the man said, “Look, I came to church and I expect that you preach. I need to be fed.” So the preacher got up and preached his sermon and he got caught up in the moment.  [Read more…]

Sale Ending: IVP Bundles 30% Off

This month’s highlighted publisher is IVP, the prestigious publisher behind many of the most-loved Bible dictionaries, commentaries, and reference works. [Read more…]

6 Recent Archaeological Discoveries That Affirm Scripture

Photo credit: Eliyahu Yanai, City of David

Each time an artifact related to the biblical narrative is unearthed in Israel or the surrounding lands of the Bible it becomes a witness to the perfection of God’s Word.  [Read more…]

Do Your Sermons Make Your Congregation Think You’re Angry?

By Matthew Kim, adapted from Preaching Points: 55 Tips for Improving Your Pulpit Ministry.

There is a temptation in every preacher to begin and end every sermon with correction. Didn’t Paul tell us in 2 Timothy 3:16 that “all Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting, and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work”? Yes, he did say that. So we follow suit and begin and end every sermon with correction, rebuke, and training in righteousness because it’s good for our listeners. Their apathy needs to be shaken up a bit with some scolding, we say to ourselves. [Read more…]