Frederick Douglass: Slaves Sing Most When They Are Most Unhappy

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) fought three great evils in his life: slavery, the subjugation of women, and hatred among humankind.

Born into slavery in 1818 and separated from his mother at birth, Douglass never knew his actual birth date. He was moved around various farms as a child and teenager in New England. He learned the alphabet from one slave owner’s wife, and from there taught himself to read and write—and was soon using the Bible to teach other slaves to read. [Read more…]

Throwing Cheese to the Glory of God

Paul describes the Christian life as the process of “being transformed into the same image [of Christ] from one degree of glory to another” (2 Cor 3:18). There is an upward and downward reading of this text. One reading will transform and the other deform us. [Read more…]

Does God Always Give Second Chances? John Says “No.”


It’s a common myth that God will always bring us back to repentance. This myth is debunked in the first letter of John. While John writes that “if we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9), he also tells us that sometimes God never gives us another chance to confess our sins and be forgiven. [Read more…]

Did the Gospel Writers Make a Mistake?

Five gospels record the life of Jesus. Four you will find in books and one you will find in the land they call holy. Read the fifth gospel and the world of the four will open to you.

– Eusebius Jerome

Possibly the most beautiful, serene place in all of the Galilee is the Mount of Beatitudes (or Mount Eremos in Greek, meaning “solitary” or “uninhabited”). [Read more…]

Every Good Sermon Has These 3 Qualities

Sometimes when people think about preaching, they think about a bunch of rules (i.e., there are three things that go into an introduction; the ways in which you make a good outline; if you are going to use illustrations, you ought to have one for every point). Those are the kinds of rules you get. [Read more…]

Theological Development among African-American Slaves (Video)

This month we’re celebrating Black History Month on the blog, and we’ll be featuring writings and teachings from African-American Christians past and present.

In this lecture from History and Theology of the African American Church, Dr. Carl Ellis, Jr. describes theological development among African-American slaves. [Read more…]

When Angels Do Time


Most Bible study resources describe fallen angels as demons who joined Lucifer in his rebellion against God. But what if I told you that the only place in the New Testament that describes angels sinning does not call them demons, has no connection to Lucifer, and has them in jail? Welcome to the world of 2 Peter and Jude. [Read more…]

Jesus Is God: Jude and Peter Tell Me So


The epistles of Peter and Jude are often overlooked in preaching and Bible study. Not only are they nestled among the more popular letters of Paul and the book of Revelation, but portions of these epistles sound odd to our modern sensibilities. That wasn’t the case in the first century. We can better grasp the meaning of these letters if we understand what they have in common with influential ancient Jewish and Christian writings that were circulating at the time. One of those literary works is known to us today as 1 Enoch, a book Peter and Jude draw upon in their letters. [Read more…]

A Brief Introduction to the Heart of Abraham Kuyper

Last year Lexham Press released a book of daily devotions from the young Abraham Kuyper, Honey from the Rock.

Though most know Kuyper now for his Christian cultural engagement, in his time he was better known for his personal meditations.

George Harinck, professor of history at the Free University of Amsterdam and Theological University of Kampen, writes in his endorsement of the book: [Read more…]

3 Reasons to Study the Biblical Geography of Israel

Israel’s geography is more than side trivia for the events in the Bible—it’s the stage God chose to place the characters of his story.

The narrative unfolds across many different landscapes, from the Mediterranean coastal region to the lower Galilee to the southern desert and beyond. It’s an epic story of God’s kingdom expanding from a garden to the whole known world.

The Bible’s original audience would’ve known these places and regions and why they were important to the story. [Read more…]