A Simple Tip for Keeping Your Greek & Hebrew Skills Sharp

Even professors who teach biblical languages typically teach just one of those languages. They must put forth some effort to maintain their skills in the language they don’t teach. Pastors, too, must take practical steps to retain their knowledge of and facility with Greek and Hebrew. One practical thing I have done for 15 years now is to keep my Greek and Hebrew Bibles (including the LXX) open every time I look at the Scripture text. Doing so has helped me keep my Greek and Hebrew from growing rusty.

There’s a simple way to make sure the original languages are always visible to you in your Bible study: creating a virtual Greek/Hebrew Bible in Logos. Let me show you how and why you should do it.

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There’s a Devil in the Details of the Day of Atonement

Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement described in Leviticus 16, is a central element of the Jewish faith, even though it is not practiced today as it was in ancient times. Although many Christians have heard of the day, most would be startled to learn that a sinister figure lurks in the shadows of Leviticus 16.

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Why We Need a New Kind of Hebrew Lexicon

Most of the time you look up a Hebrew word you probably don’t want the extreme depth and complication afforded by the top lexicons. Neither do you want to wade through a tight paragraph of tiny print full of abbreviations you don’t use often enough to remember. Paper lexicons were not designed for easy reading but for saving ink and paper.

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A Glimpse of God’s Purposes in Childbirth

Christians follow a God who throughout Scripture claims to understand the experience of giving birth—both to believers and to a whole new creation. So shouldn’t Christians have a robust view of how the birth process shapes women and shows us the heart of our Creator? In this excerpt from Holy Labor: How Childbirth Shapes a Woman’s Soul, Aubry G. Smith draws on her own experiences to show us—expectant mothers, mothers, and those who know them—how birth can illuminate the gospel.

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How God’s Grace Frees Us to Take a Risk

This is a guest post by Dr. Daniel Bush. Daniel is the author of Live in Liberty: The Spiritual Message of Galatians, May’s Free Book of the Month.

Popular Science magazine ran an intriguing story in July 1999 about the first man in space, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. Fearful that Gagarin would defect if his Vostok spacecraft reentered the atmosphere anywhere but over Soviet territory, the Russian space program rigged it with explosive charges that could be detonated by radio signal. Disarming those charges and activating the reentry system was possible only after entering a six-digit code into the onboard computer system. Gagarin had received the first three numbers before his launch. The last three were to be transmitted to him just before firing his retrorockets to slow his descent through the atmosphere.

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A Simple New Way to Search Your Bible Inside Logos

Good Bible readers have lots of questions. I wonder what other OT verses the author of Hebrews cites? Where was that other question Peter asked Jesus, the one I just read the other day? I wonder how often the NT authors refer to the fall of Adam?

And these questions lead to insights. In fact, you can’t usually get to insights unless you ask questions.

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Why Pastors Should Use a Different Greek Text

It’s the question that can derail the Sunday School class, make the pastor look poorly educated (i.e., “dumb”), and possibly even damage someone’s faith: Pastor, how come this footnote says that some manuscripts do not include the story of the woman caught in adultery?

Pastors need to know something about textual criticism.

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The Power of Spotting Metaphors in Your Bible Study

You’re reading along in Philippians and your eyes traverse Paul’s famous phrase, “our citizenship is in heaven.” Your job, Bible student or teacher, is to understand this metaphor well enough to explain it to others. But at first, it may not feel like a metaphor. It’s so commonplace among Christians that Paul’s fresh imagery may have been covered with a patina of familiarity—a familiarity which has bred, not contempt, but mental dullness.

That’s why it’s so helpful that Logos has now tagged all the metaphors in the New Testament through our newly complete Figurative Language dataset.

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When Two Bible Translations Disagree, Which One Is Right?

Have you ever been listening to a preacher who is using a Bible translation different from the one in your lap? Generally, the wording is similar enough to avoid confusion; in fact those differences often provide little insights. But occasionally the differences are so striking that you get distracted.

When Bible translations differ greatly, what’s going on?

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3 Tips for Discovering Biblical Connections in Logos

Your brain has already learned one of the most basic Bible study skills: finding connections. When you’re reading an ending to one of Paul’ letters, maybe you hear a faint echo. You think, “Didn’t Paul say something like this at the end of Colossians?” So you check, and lo and behold, he did. And it is frequently in drawing a connection between two such passages that you find insight in Bible study. Paul’s statements shed light on each other.

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