7 Ways Logos 7 Will Revolutionize Your Personal Bible Study

revolutionize-2You study the Bible because you love it, not just because you’re “supposed” to; you genuinely enjoy your time diving deep in the Word. Experiencing those “aha!” moments, discovering obscure inter-testamental connections, unearthing layers of meaning in original languages and historical-cultural contexts, and gleaning ageless wisdom from theologians throughout history—nothing thrills you like studying, really studying the Bible.

We want to fuel that passion! Here are seven ways Logos 7 will help you get more out of the Bible study you love.

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3 Things That Logos Can Do for the Lay Leader

logos-lay-leader-2Pastors are sometimes forced to squeeze their sermon prep into odd time slots, but that’s what lay leaders must always do. Lay leaders work full-time jobs and have families. I’ve been on both sides of the altar; I know the pressures.

I have stayed up till 1, sometimes 2, on Saturday nights preparing; I had a good friend who for years got up at 4:00 am on Sundays to prep for his class. Needless to say, I rely heavily on my Bible study tools—and I want to lay out the basics of what Logos can do for the 1:30 am Bible student.

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The Road to Becoming a Logos Trainer: An Interview with Morris Proctor

interview-with-morrisHe’s one of our most enthusiastic ambassadors now, but certified Logos Bible Software trainer Morris Proctor admits he was practically forced to try Logos for the first time.

“When the personal computer age hit, I was reluctant to enter the electronic world, choosing rather to stay in the comfort zone of pen and paper,” Morris says. But then a friend sat the pastor in front of a borrowed computer, booted up Logos, and demanded he learn how to use it, promising, “This will revolutionize your Bible study and sermon prep.”

“I was shocked to discover the profound impact this new method of study had on my Biblical research and sermon preparation,” remembers Morris.

Twenty years later, Morris is a Logos master, travelling the world to train fellow pastors, preachers, church leaders, and other Christians to use Logos.

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3 Practical Tips to Keep in Mind When You Quote Scripture

3-tips-quoteWrenching a Bible verse out of context isn’t the only bad Bible-quoting habit out there. There is a more subtle set of unfortunate customs we use in evangelical churches when we quote the Bible.

Here’s an example: a relative of mine was reading to me her salvation testimony as she prepared to deliver it to her church. It’s a stirring story, full of God’s grace. At the beginning she said,

Ephesians chapter 2, verses 4 through 5, states, ‘But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved.’

It is the height of rudeness to complain about someone’s Bible quotation practices after they read their beautiful conversion testimony.

It’s a good thing my relatives love me.

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How to Know That You Know the Bible

I want to know the Bible. Do you?

There are many methods for Bible study out there, and every one I’ve ever seen has something of value to contribute. Let me add one, however, that I’ve never seen anyone else explain: borrow an open secret from teachers everywhere—consider using this scaffold worked out by pedagogical experts:

  1. Remember
  2. Understand
  3. Apply
  4. Analyze
  5. Evaluate
  6. Create

You may recognize these six steps as “Bloom’s Taxonomy,” a model created by educational theorists and in use, with a tweak or two, for the last 60 or so years. It helps teachers lead students steadily, in discernible steps, from ignorance to knowledge.

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9 Reasons I Use Logos When I Preach

pastors-need-logosLogos 7 is my preferred tool for sermon preparation, but history proves you don’t have to use Logos in order to teach the Bible carefully and effectively. Somehow Paul managed pretty well without it. Augustine and Chrysostom reportedly didn’t use it either. Calvin, Luther, Edwards, Spurgeon, Bavinck, Lloyd-Jones, Frame; pick your heroes (I’m writing this, so I get to pick mine). I for one am thrilled if you live and preach the Bible, whether you use Logos to do it or not.

I’m confident that I preach and teach more effectively because I have Logos, but let me make something clear: I’m not saying digital is better than paper, or even that Augustine would have done better exegesis if he’d had Logos. Chesterton had it right:

If I set the sun beside the moon,
And if I set the land beside the sea,
And if I set the town beside the country,
And if I set the man beside the woman,
I suppose some fool would talk about one being better.

This is all true. Digital isn’t “better” than paper.

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6 Reasons Pastors Will Love the Sermon Editor in Logos 7

5-reasons-love-sermon-editorInsightful culture watcher David Foster Wallace says something in his famous essay on television that preachers need to hear—even though preachers probably already know it.

The staccato editing, sound bites, and summary treatment of knotty issues is network news’ accommodation of an Audience whose attention span and appetite for complexity have naturally withered a bit after years of high-dose spectation. (A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again, 57)

Thankfully, the Christian community in America has not been affected by high doses of television. Churchgoers are constantly asking their pastors to extend their sermons by an extra hour.

No, actually not.

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What to Do When You Find an Interpretive Quandary

interpretive-quandaryThe viewpoints of Christians of the past are not authoritative over us in the same way the Bible is—or even the same way our pastors are (Heb. 13:17). Past generations of believers made theological errors just like us, because they were fallen and limited just like we are.

But, then again, they were not limited exactly like we are. As C.S. Lewis famously pointed out in Surprised by Joy, it is “chronological snobbery” to assume that we are more advanced in every way than people from centuries past. We shouldn’t get busy congratulating ourselves for avoiding their vices before we remind ourselves how far we fall from their virtues. We need to listen to how other Christians, in all centuries, have used the Bible.

One important element of Bible interpretation is to see how other Christians throughout history have used the passage you’re studying. Logos 7 provides three brand new datasets that you can use to help you do that with a minimum of page-flipping: the Systematic Theology, Biblical Theology, and Confessional Documents datasets.

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Take a Personal, Guided Tour Through the Gospels


“Location, location, location.” Anyone familiar with real estate has certainly overheard this mantra at some point. The geographic features of a particular location influence so much of our human experience. Even beyond the aspects of climate, landscape, and natural resources, geography leaves a lasting mark on the development of societies and cultures in any given area.

Many of the most well-known narratives in Scripture are rife with geographical elements that are often overlooked because of our distance from the Holy Land. Many of Jesus’ parables and illustrations are steeped in geographic details, but some of these important and distinctive details are lost in translation—we’re simply too far removed from these locations to understand their geographic significance. Imagine having a personal tour guide of Jerusalem and the surrounding area, giving you an on-the-spot explanation of what you’re seeing and how it informs the biblical text.

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Adjusting the Soundtrack of the Atonement


When we think about the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, we often do so with an image or a set of biblical passages and categories in mind. Much like the score in a movie, those categories help us make sense of Jesus’ death. For that is what doctrine is about—helping us make sense of and understand who God is and what he has done for us, that we might better worship and serve our God.

But let’s think about that image a little more carefully—the image of a film score. Let’s say that you turn on the TV, and find yourself in the middle of a movie, but the sound is muted. Before you is a green valley, with a stand of trees in the background. What is the movie about? If the score is light and airy, a couple might soon stroll into the scene of a romantic comedy. If the score is the driving, intense music of Steve Jablonsky, the Autobots and Decepticons of Michael Bay’s Transformers may soon battle across the valley. The music we hear as we watch a scene dramatically changes our expectations, and how we perceive what is going on.

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