3 Tips for Discovering Biblical Connections in Logos

Your brain has already learned one of the most basic Bible study skills: finding connections. When you’re reading an ending to one of Paul’ letters, maybe you hear a faint echo. You think, “Didn’t Paul say something like this at the end of Colossians?” So you check, and lo and behold, he did. And it is frequently in drawing a connection between two such passages that you find insight in Bible study. Paul’s statements shed light on each other.

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How What You Love Shapes How You Interpret the Bible

Love of God and neighbor are the two great commandments upon which everything else in the Bible hangs—and, interestingly, the Bible happens to be the only book in the world written by both God and neighbor. So, for Christians, love drives hermeneutics.

Just like love drives all interpretation and discussion of online articles and social media in the United States.

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The Gospel according to Moses

This post is adapted from the transcript to Dr. Daniel Block’s Mobile Ed course on Deuteronomy.

To a lot of people, the only disease worse than Leviticus is Deuteronomy. We don’t like this book, we don’t understand this book, we don’t get the point of this book, and we are glad that it’s not in our New Testament.

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How to Compare the Septuagint to the Original Hebrew in Logos

This week’s post is centered on the following question I received from a Logos user:

I’m hoping you can help me with a frequent task: finding which Greek words (LXX) are used to translate a particular word in the Hebrew text. I’d like to know, for example, what Greek words the scholars chose to use in the LXX for “hesed,” which is so rich in meaning.

Even though not every Logos user will need this tip, the feature in the answer is a good trick to know if you venture into the original languages.

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8 Simple Words (and Some Great Books) That Will Help You Serve the Church

“Let me get back to you on that.”

Years ago, an older, wiser Christian taught me how those eight little words would help me better serve other believers. As an eager, young church leader, I would over commit, agreeing to take on responsibilities until my schedule—and my sanity—were bursting at the seams.

By committing to help so many people, I was actually limiting my ability to serve others. But asking for time to consider an opportunity allowed me to thoughtfully evaluate how it fit my priorities and calling.

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How to Search Your Highlights inside Logos

You can search for just about anything inside—or near or not near or intersecting or before or within four words of—just about anything else in Logos. You can even search particular highlighting styles.

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How Understanding Ancient History Uncovers the Hope of Easter

This is a guest post by Dr. Craig Evans, the John Bisagno Distinguished Professor of Christian Origins at Houston Baptist University.

When the Roman authority in Jerusalem crucified Jesus, who was viewed as a dangerous messianic pretender and disturber of the peace, there was no uncertainty about what came next: The body of Jesus would be buried in a tomb, but not in a place of honor. That was the Jewish law, and the Romans had no objections to it.

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Why You May Be Misreading Scripture, & What to Do about It

A few years ago, researchers discovered that our memories might not be as reliable as we think. In fact, every time you recall a memory, your brain distorts it a little. Like making a copy of a copy of a copy, you reproduce the event in your mind’s eye based on earlier versions of the memory.

You aren’t remembering the event, you’re remembering the memory.

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How to Do Some Spring Cleaning in Your Logos Library

Your library is an information filter that is itself the product of information filtering. You filtered out all the other books in the world to buy these books, and now, hopefully, they filter out all the information available in the world to tell you what you need to know for a given study project.

But as every HVAC professional will tell you, filters can get clogged, and they need to be checked. Your Logos library may need a spring cleaning. The analogy breaks down, of course, because I’m not going to recommend that you replace your information filters. But I am going to recommend that you do a little organizing.

Here’s how, in three steps.

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How Easter Reveals Jesus’ Claim on Our Lives

Since the earliest days of the church, Christians have commemorated the death, resurrection, and glorification of Jesus of Nazareth at this time every year. And there has been plenty of argument concerning the purpose of those events.

We agree that Jesus died for us, but what does that mean, really? Too often we assume that Jesus died for the forgiveness of our sins . . . and leave it at that.

But when Jesus gained victory over death itself, he claimed authority over our very lives.

Bearing our crosses

In his book Pro Rege, Abraham Kuyper, the nineteenth-century Dutch journalist and theologian turned Prime Minister, says:

People will comment that ‘everyone has their cross to bear,’ complain about ‘the cross that we just have to bear,’ or say about those with a tough lot in life that they pass through life ‘under a cross.’ . . . In accordance with this usage, any who, despite their harsh lot in life, find peace in that lot—who endure the disasters that overcome them with a steadfast spirit and do not succumb to them in despair, but find secure refuge in God—they are considered to have fulfilled Jesus’ command. (2:39)

Do you agree? Then think again:

If the world sees that you are loyal in confessing your Savior and witnessing for him, it will try and make you pay for it. . . . Matthew 10:38 does not refer to our common suffering, but only to our suffering for the sake of Christ. Moreover, it is important to realize that the suffering thus depicted lies not in that we will have to bear our cross, but in that we will be nailed to it. . . . What Jesus pronounces with ‘whoever does not take his cross,’ is not a friendly word of comfort for the hardships and sorrows of life. It is a most solemn announcement that those who confess him and witness for him must always be prepared to die for him.

Loyal subjects of a living King

Unlike believers in other parts of the world, most Christians in my country (the United States) haven’t experienced the worst horrors of Hebrews 11: “Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword.” (Heb 11:35–37)

As a turn of the century European aristocrat, neither did Kuyper. Nor was he in a place to see the atrocities of two world wars. But he understood the claims Jesus makes on all of our lives. The Easter message is one of hope and love. We are forgiven by the King of Glory. We are now his friends and heirs. But we are also his servants, and since he is King, we are his subjects. The King’s death and resurrection was so much more than a victory shout. It was a war cry, his proclamation that Satan no longer has authority or any claim to rule.

And Kuyper reminds us that Jesus’ authority extends to the life—and death—of every Christian.

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Pro Rege volume 2 is now available in both print and digital formats! Dig into its theological riches this Easter. You may find yourself disagreeing with Kuyper, but you certainly won’t be left without food for thought. Get it now.