How Many Times Is Jesus Coming Back?

Few things in the Bible attract more attention than prophecies about the end times. Even people with only a passing acquaintance with the Bible know that it foretells a second coming of Jesus. Those who study the Bible know the book of Revelation reveals that the second coming brings an end to the reign of the antichrist (the “beast”; Rev 19:11–21). The risen Christ, the incarnation of God, returns to earth not as a suffering Savior, but as the glorious warrior-king. But does the Bible describe an earlier return of Jesus—one that precedes this triumphant arrival? [Read more…]

4 Myths about Logos and the Truth about Upgrading

Are you a current Logos user thinking about upgrading to Logos 8? As with every buying decision, there’s lots to consider, and no two customers are perfectly alike.

We want to make sure you have all the information you need, so in this post we’ve pulled together common concerns we’ve heard from customers in your situation.

If you still have questions, feel free to ask us in the comments and a Faithlife employee will help you out.

Myth #1: If I get a Logos 8 package, it will replace my current Logos package.

The beauty of Logos packages is that they stack. So if you own Logos 6 and get Logos 8, your new books and features don’t replace what you currently have, they add to it. When you purchased a base package, it was just that: a base. Everything you get from now on—including an upgrade to Logos 8—adds to that base.

Myth #2: I have to buy more books to upgrade.

When you bought your first Logos package, you got a digital library and a set of Logos features. If you’re like some customers, you may be perfectly happy with the books you already have in your Logos library. Now that Logos 8 upgrades are available, you may be wondering, “Do I really want to invest in more books?”

The truth is, you can upgrade without investing in new books.

There are two type of Logos 8 upgrades: a complete upgrade and a feature upgrade. A complete upgrade includes books and features that will be added to your base package. A feature upgrade just includes the features. So if you want to upgrade to Logos 8 without adding new books to your library, this is the choice for you.

Learn more about feature upgrades.

Myth #3: I feel like I’m barely tapping into what my current package can do. Getting new features would be a waste.

We know that Logos is packed with features and that it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. That’s why when we made Logos 8, we challenged ourselves to make it the easiest-to-use version of Logos yet. As one Logos upgrader put it, “Logos 8’s new Workflows build the study process step-by-step, making the power of Logos accessible to everyone, even those new to studying the Bible.”

With Workflows, you just choose the type of study you need to do—like devotions or a word study or sermon prep—and Logos gives you clear step-by-step instructions. It’s not just for beginners, either. For example, there’s an in-depth passage exegesis workflow that will help you do truly detailed study that would make a seminary prof proud.

And best of all, Workflows show you which books and tools to use at each step. It’s a great way to make use of the features you currently have and the new stuff you get when you upgrade to Logos 8.

Myth #4: If I get a “lower package” it’s a downgrade.

Let’s say you own Logos 7 Platinum. If you get Logos 8 Gold, isn’t that a step down?

No.

As described above, an upgrade adds to what you currently own. Think of it like adding another wing to your virtual library. You could make a large addition or a small one, but whichever you choose, you get more books and more features.

That means you have lots of upgrade options to choose from, no matter your budget. And thanks to Dynamic Pricing, you’ll only pay for what’s new to you. You literally could save hundreds of dollars on your upgrade because of it.

Still have questions? Let us know in the comments and we’ll give you the information you need. And consider taking this quick quiz to get a personalized Logos recommendation.

See How All Major Doctrines Relate to Each Other

The new Theology Guide in Logos 8 will do something most people consider it impossible to do: it will change theologians’ minds.

Theologians have long known that Logos is a good tool for the study of Scripture, but to some of them that’s all it was. Now, theologians, Logos can guide your studies, too.

Search for “Image of God,” for example, in the new Theology Guide, and you’ll get quick access to all the major tools of the Lexham Survey of Theology—and there’s a lot of them.

Let me explain how they work.

[Read more…]

Remembering Grant Osborne

We were deeply saddened to learn of Grant Osborne’s passing on the morning of November 4. His faith and wisdom gave his scholarship a wonderful richness. Elliot Ritzema, who edited a number of his New Testament commentaries, shares his thoughts on Grant Osborne’s life and work. [Read more…]

5 Things You May Not Know about John Calvin

 

This week we’re celebrating the 501-year anniversary of the Reformation by discounting many Reformed resources and featuring Reformation excerpts and reflections on the blog.

Here are five facts about the esteemed author and theologian John Calvin you may not now. For just a few more days, you can save 50% on the largest collection of his writings available in English. [Read more…]

Why Luther’s 95 Theses Start with a Critique of a Bible Translation

This week we are celebrating the 501-year anniversary of the Reformation, discounting many Reformed resources and featuring Reformation excerpts and reflections on the blog.

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The first of Luther’s famous 95 Theses—whose 501st anniversary we celebrate this week—is a critique of an erroneously translated phrase in Jerome’s translation of Matthew 4:17. In English we know this as, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” Luther wrote in Thesis 1: [Read more…]

A Personal Word on the Preaching the Commentary Series

In a previous post, I shared an excerpt from the preface to the Preaching the Word Commentary Series, edited by Dr. R. Kent Hughes.

I want to follow up with a personal word about Dr. Hughes and his approach to preaching.

[Read more…]

3 Truths and a Myth about Angels

This is a guest post by Lindsay John Kennedy.

Although many popular misconceptions exist, the Bible tells us quite a bit about angels. It may not answer all our questions, but what it says, it says clearly.

In this post, we draw from Michael Heiser’s Angels: What the Bible Really Says about God’s Heavenly Host to learn how the Bible speaks about angels, starting with a common misconception about the term “angel.” [Read more…]

How to Create and Search a Passage List

In response to a recent blog about locating where Jesus speaks about the kingdom, a Logos user emailed me the following power-user tip that I wanted to pass along to you:

I create a Passage List of verses with Jesus as the Speaker in Reported Speech. Then in the future I search that list for the words I want. [Read more…]

Why Bother Learning about Angels? Michael Heiser Answers

What the Bible really says about angels is often overlooked or filtered through popular myths. Whatever you think you know about angels, there’s a good chance it’s wrong.

But why does that matter? Is a more accurate understanding of God’s heavenly host relevant for Christians today?

In his new book, Angels, Michael Heiser tackles these misconceptions head on. He grounds his study in the biblical context. In this excerpt, Heiser shows us why a correct understanding of angels is important in a correct understanding of God and his creation.

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Popular interest in angels and angel stories is high, which is symptomatic of our culture’s insatiable appetite for the supernatural. It seems every other movie or television show features a paranormal theme, alien superheroes, or some mischievous or malevolent deity. Bookstore shelves are well stocked with books about aliens, preternatural creatures, and, of course, angels and demons. That wouldn’t be the case if they didn’t sell, but sell they do. Unfortunately, the content isn’t very biblical, even when it tries.

Much of what Christians think they know about angels is more informed by Christian tradition than Scripture. The angelology of Christian tradition is, to say the least, quite incomplete and, in some ways, inaccurate.

But why should we care about angels?

Because angelology helps us think more clearly about familiar points of biblical theology. God’s supernatural family is a theological template for understanding God’s relationship to his human family of believers—and our greater importance compared to them. Learning what the Bible says about angels ultimately is tied to thinking well about how God thinks about us. What God wants us to know about angels contributes to our eternal perspective.

In our discussion of Old Testament angelology, I’ll draw your attention to the plural language of Genesis 1:26 (“let us make humankind in our image,” LEB). That language isn’t a cryptic reference to the Trinity. God is speaking to his heavenly host. He is sharing a decision with them—decreeing his will, as it were. If he were speaking to the members of the Trinity, they would already know what’s in God’s mind, because they are coequal and coeternal with him. Instead, the plural language of Genesis 1:26 intentionally connects humanity, God, and the members of the heavenly host with respect to an important biblical concept: imaging God. Imaging God is about representation—acting on God’s behalf at his behest. Humans image God on earth. The heavenly host images God in the spiritual, non-terrestrial world. The two are connected by design—and that has amazing ramifications.

Humans were tasked to make the whole world like Eden: a place where God’s goodness was known and his presence experienced; where humanity’s needs were met and God’s created world could be fully known and enjoyed; where imagers related to each other the way God related to them, with joy and love. God intended humanity to finish a task he had begun. He wanted participation—and that should sound familiar if one is familiar with the heavenly host, God’s initial family.

Understanding this status provides an answer to questions like, “How should we then live?,” “How do we image God?,” and “How should we see and treat each other?” We image God by doing what he would do, when he would do it, and with the motivation he would have for doing it. Yes, we are lesser than God and will fail. But God forgives—another lesson on what imaging means. We image God when we imitate God, acting on his behalf. It’s difficult to see how any facet of this could be deemed impractical for Christian living.

You may not have realized it while you were reading, but we just thought theologically, by means of an insight about God’s heavenly host. Believe it or not, the significant, practical idea of imaging God extended from a more insightful angelology—drawn from the plurals of Genesis 1:26, where God speaks to his heavenly host. That insight helped us think about practical holy living. Surprise!

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Discover what the Bible really says about angels and start thinking theologically about God’s heavenly host. Get Angels today!