How to Get Free Logos Books and Other Swag

Want to see all the free Logos books you don’t already have?

Want to see what Logos books are on sale?

Want to see what’s cheap?

One of our users in the Logos forums recently shared with other users the links he uses to check all these things (and more) periodically on Logos.com. Here’s his full post. I’ll share with you a few of the highlights.

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5 Reasons Studying the Original Languages Is Worth the Pain

greek hebrewShould pastors and other Bible teachers bother to learn Greek and Hebrew? You can use Greek and Hebrew without having to memorize a single paradigm, let alone 3,000 vocab words, so why torture yourself?

I’ll give you ten reasons studying the original languages is worth the pain, five this week and five next.

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Does This Textual Variant Have Theological Implications?

After the great flood, everyone had one language. Humanity congregated in the region of Babylonia (“the land of Shinar”) and started building a tower that would reach into the heavens (Gen 11:1–9). God stopped the project by transforming the single language into many—dispersing humanity over the earth and creating the nations and regions listed in Genesis 10. Most people think it ends there, but there’s more. The story picks up again in Deuteronomy 32:8–9. And the story changes, depending on what Bible version you use.

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How to Search Connections between Greek and English Bibles

Do you ever need to perform searches that connect English with Greek? For example, do you ever need to find out how a specific translation treats a given grammatical construction?

This is nearly impossible to do without the specialized tagging in Logos.

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How to Customize the Copy Bible Verse Tool in Logos

As a pastor or Bible teacher, you probably copy portions of the Bible into sermons, blog posts, academic papers, or Bible study notes all the time.

Recently I had a very specific Bible-copying need: I had to have the entire KJV New Testament text, one chapter at a time, with one verse per line, a verse number in front of each line, then a space, and no other formatting—no book names, italics chapter numbers, extra hard returns, footnotes, headings, nothing.

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Paul’s Countercultural Worldview in Philippians

The newest volume in the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary series is Philippians by Mark J. Keown. In his epistle to the Philippians, the Apostle Paul addresses internal struggles and external pressures that the church faced. In this volume, Keown shows how Paul appeals to Christ’s exemplary acts of humility and sacrifice to encourage believers to live worthy of the gospel in every aspect of life. Through rigorous examination of the original Greek text and engagement with the latest scholarship, Keown delivers an in-depth commentary on Philippians that captures the message of Paul’s letter for believers today.

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Why We Should Stop Capitalizing Pronouns Referring to God

capitalize pronouns referring to god

If you want to start a fight, meddle with people’s religion and their grammar at the same time.

Here goes: I think it’s time to drop the practice of capitalizing deity pronouns in Christian writing and in (most) Bible translations.

Shall we take this out back?

I feel the weight behind this tradition because I, too, live to honor God and I, too, want to write good English prose.

But we should still let the custom drop. Not only does it muddy our communication with the uninitiated, a similar tradition has robbed us of the knowledge of how to pronounce God’s name.

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You’ve Probably Never Seen the Real King James Version

Everyone knows the KJV was translated in 1611, but almost no one has read a 1611 KJV. Not only do the great majority of KJV editions actually come from a 1769 revision (one of a series of revisions), but even the “1611” editions available online are not perfect representations of the intentions of the KJV translators.

In an era before computers, typographical errors were introduced into the very first printed editions of the King James Bible. Subsequent printers and editors over a century and a half built up their own patina of miscellaneous, minor alterations on top of the KJV, until the text we now generally use was established by Oxford’s Benjamin Blayney almost 250 years ago.

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The Unspoken Question at the Heart of the Trinity Debate

trinity debate grudem

In this post,  Dr. Peter Leithart weighs in on the recent debate concerning relationships in the Trinity. Don’t miss Michael Bird’s overview of the debate over at the Logos Academic Blog. Then, visit this blog next Tuesday for an exclusive video of Wayne Grudem responding to his critics.

And for multiple perspectives on this issue—including video lectures from Wayne Grudem and Bruce Ware—check out the Mobile Ed course Perspectives on the Trinity: Eternal Generation and Subordination in Tension (40% off until June 9). 

The recent Evangelical brawl about the Trinity has focused on the work of Bruce Ware and Wayne Grudem, both of whom have denied the eternal generation of the Son and said that the Son is eternally “subordinate” to the Father.

On the first point, the critics are entirely correct, as both Ware and Grudem now admit. The debate concerning eternal “subordination” has been more chaotic and proportionally less illuminating. Some critics responded as if Ware and Grudem were Arians, teaching that the Son is ontologically inferior to the Father, a being somewhat less than fully divine. Both vehemently deny this charge. Ware and Grudem are instead talking about a taxis of equally divine persons, and Grudem has produced an impressive catalog of reliable Protestant theologians who also talk of the eternal “subordination” of the Son. If nothing else, he has demonstrated that his terminology isn’t novel.

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Has the Gospel-Centered Pendulum Swung Too Far?

The American evangelical church likes to ride pendulum swings. I’m not talking about the revolving door of theologically vapid church marketing gimmicks. I mean things that you and I do. You know, us: the kind of people who read Bible software blogs, who take biblical study and doctrine seriously.

In the most recent issue of Themelios—a theological journal you can get for free in Logos—Dane Ortlund helps us arrest one particularly powerful pendulum swing. His article, “Reflections on Handling the Old Testament as Jesus Would Have Us: Psalm 15 as a Case Study,” addresses the “remarkable resurgence of Christocentric interpretation,” an “impulse to resist moralistic and graceless readings” of Scripture. The relatively recent popularity of biblical theology and of “gospel-centeredness” are also part of this particular pendulum swing.

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