How to See Changes in the ESV (though They Don’t Matter Much)

The ESV came out in 2001, just as I was starting seminary. I bought one that was made of paper—the iconic black hardcover with a big white pane on the front. My roommate grabbed it and promptly spilled tea on it. [Read more…]

Revelation: Why We Must Fight the Lie That God Doesn’t Care

By Aubry Smith

Through windows, televisions, and internet portals, my view of the world looks bleak. Conflicts erupt across the globe; protests escalate into riots. The global refugee crisis continues to expand, and injustices in refugee camps call out to us. Shooters invade schools, synagogues, mosques, churches. In my own life, the past few years have seen my mother’s descent into dementia, then her sudden death by cancer, and the suicide of my younger brother. It often feels as if the darkness is overcoming the light.  [Read more…]

A Biblical Perspective on Racial Diversity from John Stott

In the late 1970s, British nationalism and racial discrimination were in full swing, and British Christians began to voice their increasing concern.

One way that evangelical leader, John Stott, did this was through his monthly column “Cornerstone” in Christianity Today, written between 1977 and 1981. Those articles covered “a wide spectrum of theological, ethical, cultural, and global issues.”1
[Read more…]

More Than a Love Poem—What the Song of Solomon Reveals about God’s Design for Marriage

By Walter C. Kaiser Jr.

Marriage comes as one of the gifts from our Creator’s hands to us mortals—we who are made in his image. The idea of one man and one woman being joined together in matrimony and in a covenant with each other, as well as simultaneously in covenant with God (Prov 2:17; Mal 2:14), is central to this teaching. It is one of the great foundational teachings of Scripture.  [Read more…]

Who Does the Lord Deliver? One Abolitionist Offers a Biblical Response.

By Todd R. Hains

Things are not the way they’re supposed to be. We live in a world filled with suffering and injustice, where the wicked often prosper and the righteous often languish. Scripture assumes this basic truth. Yet it doesn’t provide a clear and simple reason why this is so. Instead, the Bible gives us rhythms and words of protest, prayer, and praise.  [Read more…]

How a British ‘Master Spy’ Saved Thousands of Jews in the Holocaust

Today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 75th anniversary of the Jewish liberation from Auschwitz. Despite the horrors that occurred at Auschwitz and other concentration camps, thousands of Jewish lives were spared because of the covert operations of unsung heroes. One such man was Francis “Frank” Foley. [Read more…]

From Sinai to Olivet: Cosmic Mountains in the Gospel of Matthew

By David B. Schreiner

A common word for “mountain” in the Greek New Testament is oros, and Matthew uses it more than any other book. Technically speaking, oros is an imprecise term that can refer to anything from a hill to tall mountain.1 Of the four Gospels, Matthew leads the way with 16 occurrences of oros (Mark has 11, Luke 14, and John five). Clearly, the Gospel writers remember how mountains were an important backdrop for Jesus’ ministry.  [Read more…]

Why Obedience to Jesus Trumps All: Thoughts on the Sermon on the Mount

By Craig S. Keener

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus summons us to stake our hearts on the reality of God. Both Matthew and Luke report much of this sermon, and James is among New Testament writers who echo it. In Matthew’s version, Jesus offers ethical instruction more radical than the law of Moses. We can see this in the opening section of Jesus’ teaching—especially Matthew 5:17–48—and it continues through the rest of the sermon (6:1–7:28). [Read more…]

The Gifts of the Magi and the Threefold Role of Christ

Hilary of Poitiers (around AD 315–367/8) became bishop of Poitiers, in western France, in AD 350. Soon after, he was drawn into disputes over Arianism, the heretical teaching that Jesus was created by God the Father. Hilary was condemned in 356 and exiled for four years to Phrygia (a region of modern-day Turkey). During that exile, he argued against Arianism at the Council of Seleucia. 1 The clarity of his theological understanding has made him one of the most widely respected Latin theologians. [Read more…]

5 Words You’re Probably Not Getting in the Christmas Story

Every Christmas Eve growing up, my father read the Christmas story from Luke 2 in the King James Version.

And every Christmas Eve, I thought I understood it. I largely did. But I now see little things I was missing—through no fault of my own, nor of the KJV translators, but simply because of the inevitable process of language change. The KJV is 400 years old, after all. I now see these little things because I focused hard on them while writing my book, Authorized: The Use and Misuse of the King James Bible.

Here are five things you might not have noticed you were missing in the Christmas story in Luke 2 in the King James Version. [Read more…]