Liddell-Scott-Jones (LSJ) as a complement to BDAG

I was all set to start to write a post about how I use LSJ as a complement to BDAG when I’m looking into word meanings in the Greek New Testament.

Then I realized I’d already written such a beast, and it’s been on our web site for awhile now. If you’ve been wondering why a lexicon that covers a large range of classical material (like LSJ) would be useful in studying either LXX or New Testament Greek, then you may want to check out the article.

And, if you’re interested, you can read an overview of how we (Logos) came to the decision to produce LSJ as a Logos book. In the process, you’ll learn a bit about how we take stuff from print to electronic via the Pre-Publication Program.

Opening Two Copies of the Same Book

I received the following comment regarding my post about Logos Workspaces:

I saw your post regarding your workspace in Libronix and I had a question: How do you open the same book twice? You did this for the ESV and I can not figure it out for the life of me. Any help would be wonderful. Thanks

I suppose this really isn’t prominently documented. But in Logos Bible Software, if you hold down the SHIFT key while clicking a link, you open a new version of the target resource.

So if you see a link for a Bible reference and SHIFT+Click the reference, a new version of your preferred Bible will open if you already have a copy open. This is very handy — it means you won’t lose your place in your primary Bible window (and any linked windows) by following bunny trails.

I usually keep a second version of the ESV open, and I also mark it as the Reference Target Window (the little red book icon in the book icon bar that has the arrow pointing to itself). That way, whenever I click a Bible reference, it will jump to that specific window — and not cause any of my other linked windows to jump around.
This SHIFT+Click logic carries to opening books in general. So if you're in My Library and do the SHIFT+Click book-opening dance, you'll open a new copy of the book you clicked. It's amazing what you learn when you write a blog article. A few folks here at the office read this one and told me I was missing out — that there are all sorts of ways to open another instance of the same resource. Some of these ways to open another copy of the same book include:

  • Window | New Window will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • CTRL + SHIFT + N will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • I've been told that in future versions of the LDLS (currently in alpha testing) will support multiple opening in the "Go"/Quick Nav box. So if you type 'ESV' and then ENTER, then ENTER again, two instances of the ESV will open.

New International Greek Testament Commentary (NIGTC)

We’ve got a lot going on here at Logos (have you looked at our pre-pub page lately? Zowie!) but the one I’m most excited about is getting ready to ship: The New International Greek Testament Commentary, or NIGTC.

I’ve used Knight’s NIGTC volume on the Pastoral Epistles and it is consistently a great place to go when I’m confused as to what is going on in the Greek text.

One example where NIGTC helped me recently is given below.

I was looking into the creedal/hymn fragment in 1Ti 3.16, particularly the line that the ESV translates “vindicated by the Spirit”. The Greek for that line (NA27) is ????????? ?? ????????. I was wondering about the reason for assuming that ?? ???????? referred to the Holy Spirit as there was no article, which would normally be a clue. I agree with the reading that this refers to the Holy Spirit, but wanted to know the linguistic/grammatic reason.

[Read more…]

Bibliographies and Book Evaluation

In a recent post on the Logos Bible Software Blog, Daniel Foster writes:

Just writing this post brings it home to me that there is a definite need for more bibliographic “metabooks” (or perhaps more of us, myself included, should take advantage of the many that have been written). And it would be great to have more of these metabooks as electronic books in Libronix.

Daniel is correct, of course. Here are a few resources that may be of help when you are looking to evaluate a book; whether it is already in your Logos Bible Software library or if you’re looking at a copy in actual, bona-fide print.

  • Critical Review of Books in Religion (1988-1998). This is a set of books that is currently under production here at Logos. It is a collection of scholarly reviews of books in religion. Go read the pre-pub description and see if this type of stuff is for you.
  • Review of Biblical Literature. This is a web site that releases new reviews of books in the realm of Biblical Studies and Ancient Near East studies on a weekly basis. You can search by all sorts of criteria. You can subscribe to the weekly listing of new reviews as well (the subscription is free).
  • Getting to Know Your Library. This is a support article I wrote awhile back. It discusses some strategies you can use to get to know more about the books in your Logos Bible Software library.

Using Keylinking to Navigate Between Greek Lexicons

When I’m working through the Greek text at the word level, many times I like to get a second opinion. My primary Greek lexicon is BDAG, which is an excellent resource, but I do like to consult others. My favorite lexicons to consult for second opinion are:

This article explains just a little bit about Greek keylinking and then shows you how to keylink from lexicon to lexicon using the keylink functionality straight from the right-click menu. No funky keystrokes involved.

[Read more…]

Using the Works of Philo with BDAG

One thing I like to do when examining Greek word usage is to evaluate how the Greek word is used in similar context outside of the New Testament corpus.

This article will point out an easy way to use the Works of Philo (in English) in conjunction with the BDAG Lexicon. This same method can be used with other Greek corpora for which Logos Bible Software has English translations, such as the Works of Josephus (in English) or the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha.

The strategy discussed is really a temporary one as we’re currently working on versions of the following corpora in Greek, fully morphologically annotated:

[Read more…]

Rick’s Logos Bible Software Workspace

Logos Bible Software supports the concept of a workspace. Workspaces are used in different ways by all sorts of people. The basic idea is for the software to keep track of your window arrangement, open texts, linked windows and other stuff.

Awhile back, on my personal blog, I blogged on how I’ve got my primary workspace set up. I thought it would be fun to share that here too. Click the above link to head to the article.

I’ve had a decent amount of feedback from folks that this article helped them understand a bit more about workspaces and gave them some insights to relationships between texts. If you work in the New Testament, and if you work through the Greek word-by-word, then you may enjoy checking it out.

Using Logos to Examine NT Variants

In my morning devotional time, I’ve been reading through the Pauline Epistles in larger chunks. I tend to dwell in areas, reading the larger chunks over again, and sometimes dwelling on smaller chunks.

For the past week I’ve been in First Corinthians 12 and 13. And I’ve been dwelling on 1Co 13.1-3.

But as is my way, I’ve looked at the text in the Greek too. And I noticed some stuff from a text-critical perspective, so I thought a post on how I walk through this kind of stuff might be a good one. So, even though I’ve recently discussed some of these issues on my personal blog, in this article I’ll go into a little different detail, showing how I use Logos Bible Software in this regard.

There are two things in particular that jumped out at me when evaluating 1Co 13.1-3:

  1. The use of καὶ ἐὰν twice in v. 2, but the use of κἂν and καὶ ἐὰν in v. 3. The word κἂν is a crasis of καὶ ἐὰν. Why isn’t one or the other used consistently?
  2. The use of οὐθέν in v. 2 but οὐδὲν in v. 3. Why the different form of the word in each instance? Why isn’t one or the other used consistently?

There are a few different LDLS resources I’ll be using to examine what the textual evidence is in these situations. They are:

[Read more…]

Nouns and Adjectives and Graphical Queries, Oh My!

On Saturday morning I was studying the first part of 1Ti 4.6:

If you put these things before the brothers, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, (1Ti 4.6a, ESV)

When I was looking into the term “good servant”, I noticed that in the Greek it was an adjective and a noun that agreed in case and number. So, I wondered, what other things are called “good” in the Pastoral Epistles? This article explores ways to specify this sort of search with the Graphical Query Editor.

[I should note that I have been working through the Pastoral Epistles for some time. I blog about the Pastoral Epistles at http://PastoralEpistles.com and have some other information on my personal web site.]

This is the sort of thing that the Graphical Query Editor is designed to do without getting too bogged down in intricate search syntax. Sure, you could learn the syntax to specify it in a textual query, but it’s much more fun to make a pretty picture to specify your search query, like this:
[Read more…]

Scholar’s Library Silver Reviewed in RBL

The Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) sponsors a service known as the Review of Biblical Literature. This service publishes reviews of Biblical literature every week and makes the reviews available on the web for anyone to consult.

This week, one of the items they reviewed is our Scholar’s Library Silver Edition. By all means, please, check out the review.

And make sure to check out their search feature as well. If you’re looking for books in a particular area of Biblical or Ancient Near East studies, many times you’ll be able to find an in-depth scholarly review of the title you’re interested in.