Logos Curry 2006: Fire and Nice

We mentioned our Sixth Annual Logos Curry Cook-Off last week and promised recipes of the top three curries.

David Kaplan’s curry “Fire and Nice” was second only to Bob’s first-place effort. Here’s the recipe. David’s notes are a little more involved, but the curry was really yummy so it is worth the effort.

  • Three pounds chicken tenders – DO NOT CUT UP
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • Two tablespoons Habanero powder
  • Two 15 oz. cans of chicken broth
  • 5 large onions – cut into large chunks
  • Three medium heads of Broccoli – using only the flowerets.
  • Two very large red apples — Peel and cut into ¼” thick slices. DO NOT DICE UP.
  • A Boat load of curry powders — three different kinds. One was a Jamaican Style by “Spice Right” where the first ingredient was ginger. One was a “Miami Spice” curry powder where the ingredients are unknown, all it said was “A Blend of Natural spices including Tumeric”. The other Curry powder was from the bulk section at the grocery store. I never measured the curry powder, just kept dumping it in until I saw the color I wanted and it smelled robust.
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • one tablespoon Garlic powder – not too much. It will overwhelm the other flavors.

First I put the chicken tenders in a huge bowl and dumped in a boat load of curry powders and mixed it up real good. Then I let the tenders sit for about 15 minutes mixing every five minutes. It was kind of like doing a rub.

Then I put the chicken tenders and vegetable oil in a large soup pot and cooked them until firm – stirring often.

Then I added the onions cut into large chunks. (This is for texture in the final product). and more curry powders. Cook for another 15 minutes stirring every three minutes or so.

Then add in the Chicken broth, garlic powder and the Habanero powder, cook for another 20 minutes. Stirring every five minutes.

Then add in the apple slices, and broccoli and more curry powder and cook until you can’t discern that there was ever any broccoli in the recipe (about 45 minutes). Stir vigorously every ten minutes or so. There will be a few small chunks of apples still discernable. The chicken will be fairly chunky still, but a lot of it will have broken down into the mix.

All the while you’re cooking – keep tasting, and salt and pepper to taste.

Then put it in the fridge over night. It tasted better the next day.

Logos Curry 2006: Columbus’ Loss

We mentioned our Sixth Annual Logos Curry Cook-Off last week and promised recipes of the top three curries.

Bob Pritchett’s curry “Columbus’ Loss” garnered the most votes in our 2006 Curry Cook-Off. Bob’s notes on the recipe are brief:

Here’s the recipe.

I used boneless chicken thighs and ground ginger. And the strongest cumin I’ve ever tasted.
— Bob

So if you like curry, check it out and slip it in the recipe box. The folks at Logos approve!

Who Did What? Looking at Verbs in a Reverse Interlinear

Earlier I blogged about Highlighting English based on Greek Morphology. This involved using Logos Bible Software 3 and a Reverse Interlinear of the New Testament to highlight words based on the underlying language’s morphology (word form, part-of-speech type information).

Over the past weekend I was thinking that this would be perfect to use when working through a text doing something like participant analysis. One thing that I find handy when working through a text at a paragraph/sentence level is to stop at each finite verb (verbs that aren’t participles or infinitives) and determine who is taking part in the action. I also like to see if there is someone or something that the action is being done to, or if there are other circumstances to the action.

Using Logos Bible Software 3, the Morphology Filter applied to a Reverse Interlinear makes this easy — particularly if you don’t know Greek. Here’s what you do.

  • First, check out the video on how to specify a morphology filter in a reverse interlinear.
  • Second, once your Logos Bible Software 3 is fired up, specify a morphology filter for the ESV New Testament Reverse Interlinear. Your Part of Speech should be Verb, the Verb Type should be Finite.
  • Third, specify the style of highlighting you’d like. I just specified yellow highlighting.
  • Fourth, go to your passage and stop at the highlights. Ask yourself questions like:
    • Who or what is doing this action? That is, who is the actor?
    • Who or what is the action being done to? That is, is there an object?
    • Are there additional circumstances to the action? Clarifying adverbs or prepositional phrases?
    • Is the same person/thing doing action here that was doing the action with the previous verb? Or has there been a shift?
    • [whatever other questions you think appropriate]

When examining the text at this level, you should keep track of where the same party (or parties) is doing the action, and where the actor changes. This may indicate secondary action (e.g., “Jim said, ‘When I was with Dorothy, she decided we’d have dinner at the Olive Garden’ “.) or it may indicate a larger shift at, say, a paragraph level.

Stopping at verbs and examining the flow of action in the passage is one very useful way to work through a passage at a high level. Using reverse interlinears to combine the underlying original language part-of-speech information with highlighted English makes it much easier for those with no knowledge of the original languages to start to consider these issues in their study.

2006 Logos Curry Cookoff

Last Friday was the sixth annual Logos Curry Cookoff. Logos Cookoffs are always fun days; the curry cookoff is one of the most fun. We had 17 different curries this year, and they were all excellent.
This year’s winners were:

  • Bob Pritchett with Columbus’ Loss
  • David Kaplan with Fire and Nice
  • James Van Noord with Green Monster

More pictures from the day are “below the fold”. We also hope to blog at least the top three recipes so Logos users can enjoy some curry at home, too.

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Syntax: OpenText.org Clauses and Word Groups

Those who have followed the series of posts here regarding the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament (see the syntax category archive) might be interested in the following articles on the OpenText.org site:

These articles walk through the basic annotation process, explaining the OpenText.org annotation process. In the midst of that, you get a great introduction to how and why the data is marked up like it is, which will help in considering how to use the syntactic information therein.

If you’re curious about the hows and whys of the Logos implementation of the OpenText.org material, then you need to read these articles.

Syntax Search Example: Relative Pronouns

When working through a passage, it can be important to work through pronoun usage. Sometimes pronouns have direct referents, sometimes the referents are implied.
A familiar example is found in the first three verses of First John:

1 That whicha was from the beginning, whichb we have heard, whichc we have seen with our eyes, whichd we looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life— 2 the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal lifef, whichf was with the Father and was made manifest to us— 3 that whiche we have seen and heard we proclaimabcde also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. (1Jn 1.1-3, ESV)

In the above, the English words translated from relative pronouns are in bold, the pronoun referent is in bold italic text. Note use of superscript letters to align pronoun with specific referent as there are two referents in the above example.
How did I know that? Well, let’s just say that the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament and the Syntax Search dialog are my friends.

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Syntax Search Example: Articular Participle in Clause Complement (Object)

I was talking with Daniel Foster yesterday afternoon. We were talking about syntax search examples and how they’re different than other sorts of morphological searches.
One type of search that we used to rely on the Graphical Query Editor to do (and still do; we didn’t take this capability away) was to do what is generally known as “agreement searching”.
An example would be: Find where two words exist N words apart (where, say, N = 5) and the two words agree on some sort of morphological criteria (like, say, case, number or gender).
This sort of approach is commonly used to find where a noun or participle has an article, or where an adjective is associated with a noun. Things like that. In essence, we approximate an established syntactic relationship using proximity (within N words) and morphological criteria (sharing same case, number and gender).
What we really want, though, is where an article modifies a participle or noun. That is, where the article and participle have an established relationship. The number of words that separate them is incidental, they could be next to each other or they could be 15 words apart. We’re interested in the specific relationship.
The good news is: This search can be done in the New Testament with an underlying syntactic database. Since we’ll be searching the entire New Testament, we’ll use the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament, which has been discussed previously on this blog.
The better news is: We can do even more — like, say, find where participles have an article that modifies, and where the “articular participle” is (for example) in the Complement (object) of a clause. Like what the below syntax search specifies.

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Highlighting English Based on Greek Morphology

It’s cool to see features and datasets combine in ways that weren’t originally anticipated.
Just the other day, Eli and I were talking with Dale Pritchett (VP Marketing and Bob’s father!) and Dale wondered about how to highlight an English text based on Greek or Hebrew morphology. Sort of like this:

Eli and I looked at each other quizzically. Then at about the same time we had the answer: Reverse Interlinear! And the cool part is that the feature already works in Logos Bible Software 3! It is a consequence of having data and functionality already in place, we just hadn’t quite stopped to realize the extent of the functionality. But it is a consequence of:

  • Having Reverse Interlinears available that align the original language texts (Greek and Hebrew) with a modern language translation at the word level.
  • Having morphological information in the original language texts underlying the English translation of the Reverse Interlinear.
  • Having a Visual Filter (a method of overlaying highlighting based on specified criteria) for morphologies.

Because of the architecture of Logos Bible Software … well, it just works. Nothing extra needed.
Here’s a short video (Flash, approx. 0.7 MB, no sound) that walks through how to specify the visual filter for the reverse interlinear. It walks through setting up a visual filter that highlights where finite verbs (i.e., verbs in the indicative, imperative, subjunctive or optative moods) occur in the Aorist tense. These will be visually highlighted with the “Box” style, so you can simply see them as you scroll through the text. And you’ll see how the ESV handles translating them. After the visual filter is set, I then show how interlinear lines are customizable. In the end, you see only the English text of the ESV, but the English words that represent the aorist verbs are highlighted … and no Greek is in sight.


Video: Flash, approx. 0.7 MB, no sound

Pretty cool. Give it a try if you’re running the Release Candidate!

Searching Libraries Remotely

I’m excited about a lot of the features in the upcoming Logos Bible Software 3. One of them that hasn’t received much air time is the Remote Library Search.

Huh?

That’s right. Remote Library Search.

Let’s face it, there are a decent amount of folks out there that are book geeks, just like me. We’re the type of people who:

  • Actually read footnote references.
  • Hate books that use endnotes instead of footnotes because you have to constantly refer to the back of the book.
  • Actually look up citations in footnotes and endnotes.
  • Feel like you need to obtain cited books if they sound interesting or appropriate based on the footnote.

Remote Library Search is for you.

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Of the Making of Books (Part 9)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

AMG Publishers

You might recall that in Part 2 of this series, we described a “hybrid” partnership with InterVarsity Press (US and UK), where we license some titles and also create publisher-marketed products. Another successful partnership in this category is with AMG Publishers. If you don’t know the AMG name, you might recognize the name of their president—Spiros Zodhiates.

AMG’s first product, Bible Essentials, was released in April 2001 and updated to the Libronix Digital Library System in September 2004. This outstanding collection includes the well-known Complete Word Study Dictionary and Complete Word Study Bible (KJV), along with a dozen or so key reference titles.

We currently license several individual titles from AMG and also have two exciting collections in our pre-publication program: The Following God Workbook Series and Learning the Basics of New Testament Greek.

Next: Baker Publishing Group