Here’s Something Nuevo … er, New

Last week, I posted about syntax searching for “fronted complements“.

Today, I ran the same search with a slight preference change. Here’s the result. Can you see what’s new in this screenshot?

What’s different here? (hint: the column on the right … )

Did you get it?

That’s right, the difference is that the syntax hits are highlighted in Spanish (the 1960 Reina Valera New Testament). Now, the Nuevo Testamento Interlineal Revertido Español-Griego: Reina Valera 1960 is still in development, but you can see how, even though it is Spanish, it just plugs right in and is useful in the same way as the ESV NT Reverse Interlinear.

Search hits work the same way:

Reverse Interlinear … with Spanish!

This was all done — again, on my computer here at the office because the resource has not been released yet — by switching my preferred Bible to the Reina Valera Revisada (1960).

Oh, yeah … we’re working on an RV1960 Old Testament Reverse Interlinear as well …

Hints on Reading the Logos Help Manual

In Logos Bible Software, context-sensitive help is available from dialogs or reports just by pressing the help button.
But sometimes you might just want to read the manual. And you can do that too, because the manual is a book in the system.
That’s right. Just go to My Library. Type in “help manual”. Hit enter or click on the title.
This is what is known as a non-scrolling book. It is a series of articles, each article is a separate “scrolling” region of text. Sort of like a series of web pages.
On books like this, it is handy to open up the Table of Contents Pane in the book window. Like below.

Just click the button, and the TOC Pane opens up. You can navigate the book this way. Or search it with the LDLS search engine. Set bookmarks so you can remember where you left off. It’s your choice.
Another Hint: Try the Locator Pane by clicking the button next to the TOC Pane button.

Syntax Search Example: Fronted Complements

Awhile back, I blogged on Sleepy Disciples. That blog post looked at the predicator (verb) προσεύχομαι and the different adjuncts that modified each of its occurrences in Matthew 26.
Looking at that passage again, I noticed the following embedded clause in the last adjunct in Mt 26.44:

In this embedded clause, the complement is the first thing in the clause. Some would say this is an instance of fronting, where there is non-standard (for narrative, anyway) component order.

It occurred to me that this sort of thing is now searchable, given a syntactic analysis of the text. So I created the below video which explains things a bit more and walks through setting up a syntax search that will locate fronted complements with a headword of λόγος — much like what occurs here in Mt 26.44.

Syntax Search Example: Two Words in the Same Word Group

A user commented on a recent post:

On the OpenText site,, Matthew Brook O’Donnell mentions the ability to find THEOS and AGAPE within the same word group. I have not been able to do that yet, probably because I can’t yet figure out the nesting structure I need in my search.
I wonder if you might demonstrate that or point me to one of your earlier tutorials where you have done something similar.

Since I haven’t blogged about syntax searches like this, and since there is a very cool technique using the Agreement dialogue that makes this sort of search (find two words in any order) fairly simple, I figured I’d do a screen recording video to show y’all how it works.

There are two searches detailed in the video. One answers the question with a very general search, the other searches a bit more specifically.

Grammatical Relationships: Parallel English & Original Language

An earlier post on the Bible Word Study Grammatical Relationships feature garnered the following comment. I inserted the referenced graphic as well.

When I do what you did, I get everything except the side by side translations of the passage as you show above (where you made the notes in red). For instance, I just show the cite Matt 13:14, but not the translations with the colored keys to the study word and the subject. What am I missing?

Yes, this isn’t exactly obvious. Grammatical Relationships mirrors the preferences you have set for syntax search results. So try creating a basic syntax search — such as searching for all primary clauses with the word ἀγαπάω as the predicator (verb) in the database. You know, like we find in John 3.16. Here’s a short video to show you how: Flash, 9:20, 11 megs, with sound. [NB: When I recorded the video, my computer was in the midst of a massive process that took some significant processor cycles. So it’s a little slow in some areas.]

Then modify the search results. Note the “Current View” drop-down in the results menubar. This controls the columns. Also note the Bible button. This is where the English will come in. If your preferred Bible is the ESV, then toggling the button on should cause the ESV to display with proper highlighting in the search results window. Again, the video shows you how this works.

These preferences will then be mirrored in Grammatical Relationships.

Greek Syntax: Sleepy Disciples

Hi folks, I’m back after an extended holiday. And for an upcoming home group study, I’m starting to work through the epistle to the Colossians. So I’ve been reading it recently. In reading, I came across Colossians 1.9, which has the phrase “we have not ceased to pray for you”. In looking at the word “pray”, I noticed this is a predicator (“pray”, in an embedded clause) with an adjunct (“for you”). At least, that’s how the ESV translates it. So I wondered what other sorts of adjuncts modify the word used here for “pray” (προσεύχομαι).

This was the beginning of a rabbit trail, but a fun one. I won’t detail the syntax search (I’ve done similar searches before, check the syntax archives) but I would like to poke around a bit in one area where some interesting hits were grouped together.

In searching for adjuncts that modify προσεύχομαι, I happened across Matthew 26.36-46. In those 10 verses, there are three instances of προσεύχομαι. The first (v. 36) has two adjuncts, the second (v. 42) has three adjuncts, and the third (v. 44) has four adjuncts.

This concentration seemed interesting, so I poked through the text further. I spent all of 15 minutes or so thinking about this before I recorded the one-take video below, but it is an example of the kinds of thoughts that slowing down and examining the clause structure through the syntax graph can generate.

Serendipitous discovery facilitated.

A Trick With Bible Speed Search

One thing I use the Bible Speed Search feature for is to do quick searches of the New Testament for a Greek word, but display my hits in English.


Yes, I type in a Greek lemma, but the results are provided in English with the proper English word highlighted. Rather than explain it all, I figured I’d put a quick video together to show you.

Note in the video that I use the F2 key to cycle between English, Hebrew and Greek keyboards (in that order) in order to type in English and Greek on the same line. I probably should’ve mentioned that, but it’s too late now.

Remember, you can do this with right-clicks too. See this previous entry for more details (with a video).

Bible Word Study Report Round-up

It seems a good thing to have one place we can point to for a listing of all of the posts on the Bible Word Study report. So here it is.

If you’ve recently stumbled across the Logos Bible Software Blog, then you’ve likely missed some of these posts. Check ’em out!

Bible Word Study Report Part VII: Report Properties

This is the seventh and final portion of my series on the Bible Word Study (BWS) report. It’s been a few weeks since I’ve blogged on this topic, but it is time to wrap up the thread.

Since we’ve only discussed how the Bible Word Study report deals with Greek text, we’ll limit this discussion to the options for Greek words inside of the report.

The report properties are broken up in sections—the same sections that are included in the BWS report itself. So the Lemma properties have to do with the Lemma, etc. So we’ll refer back to earlier posts as we step through each section’s properties.

[Read more…]

Logos Chili Day!

Every year, around the 4th of July, Logos has a company Chili Cook-Off. This is the grandaddy that started them all (the curry cookoff, the soup cookoff and the salsa cookoff are spinoffs of the chili cookoff!).
Today, July 7, 2006, is our Seventh Annual Chili Cookoff. You can check out some photos and commentary from last year’s Chili Cookoff if you’d like.
We’ll post the results on Monday, so stay tuned!