Why I Bought Another Base Package


logos-6-goldI got Logos 6 Gold the day it came out. For me it was a no-brainer. The combination of new tools like Visual Copy, Interactive Media, and a solid set of reference works—many of which I’d already been eyeing—made it an easy decision.

At the time, I was deep into a study of Old Testament altars, and Cultural Concepts helped me make connections that I would have otherwise missed. My love for Logos 6 hasn’t waned an ounce since then. Every time I open the software I learn something new.

But last week I noticed something. Many users, especially Logos 6 owners, were buying second and third base packages. I had never considered doing this; one research library seemed to serve me just fine. I wondered, “What do these people know that I don’t?

So I did a little investigating, and it turns out that I could add some very valuable reference works to my library at a huge savings if I picked up a second base package.

baptist-bronzeI started with the Baptist track because it’s the most familiar to me. (I grew up Baptist, and my father is still a Baptist pastor in the southeastern US.) And sure enough, Logos 6 Baptist Bronze included 63 books that would be new to me.

The tradition-specific base-package tracks share many of the same reference works that powered my library, but they also included some works that I lacked, including:

Thanks to Dynamic Pricing, I could add these 63 titles to my library for just $175.66—that’s $2.76 per title! This seemed like another no-brainer to me.

reformed-bronzeThen I jumped over to the Reformed track, and found much of the same. Dynamic Pricing offers me Logos 6 Reformed Bronze (and its 26 books new to me) for less than $100. The price per title was a little higher—at $3.17—but the quality of works included was also high:

So for less than $3.25 per title, I could add nearly 100 more exceptional reference works to my Logos library. I was missing out!

If, like me, your appetite for learning seems to outrun your book budget and you’re always on the hunt for a bargain, I’d encourage you to add a second (or third) base package to your library.

Base packages are the most cost-effective way to grow your theological library, especially for those of us who have been Logos users for a long time and can—by virtue of our existing libraries—make good use of Dynamic Pricing. Base-package families enable us to augment our library with teaching from the traditions we’d like to explore further.

With introductory offers like 15% off and up to $900.00 worth of gifts available, this is the best time to buy. These offers end soon, so take advantage of them before they’re gone!

Shop for your second (or third) base package today.

Context Matters: Dr. John Walton Explains Why

mobile-ed-john-walton-background-of-the-old-testament-bundleThanks to Mobile Ed, you can sit under the dynamic instruction of professors like Dr. John Walton of Wheaton College from the comfort of your own living room.

Dr. Walton has been teaching about the the ancient cultures in which the Bible was written for more than 20 years. In his two-course set on Old Testament backgrounds, Dr. Walton teaches how to analyze the Old Testament text on its own terms, and understanding the original author’s intent in context.

Check out this animated preview to see the kinds of topics Dr. Walton addresses in these courses:

Context matters. That’s why we’ve built so many tools into Logos 6 to help you understand the culture in which the text was written. Cultural Concepts was designed with this very purpose in mind. Over 1,000 cultural concepts across 80,000 hand-labeled tags make ancient ideas accessible to modern readers like you and me.

Use tools like Logos 6’s Cultural Concepts and courses like Dr. Walton’s to deliver helpful and refreshing biblical insights to those around you.

Master Old Testament backgrounds with Dr. Walton’s two-course bundle, and get Logos 6 to continue learning with tools like Cultural Concepts.

Cultivate a Big-Picture View of Scripture: This App Makes It Easier

every-day-bible-appThe Bible is a big book. Many people read it faithfully every day for years, and still never develop a big-picture view of it.

For example:

  • How does the story of the Exodus foreshadow the earthly ministry of Jesus?
  • Why would God direct the prophet Hosea to marry a prostitute?

The reading plan and devotional built into the Every Day Bible app make answers to these and other difficult questions more accessible. Pairing Old and New Testament passages with a selection of biblical poetry each day, Every Day Bible invites you to develop a big-picture view of scripture, discovering connections between passages that you may not have noticed before.

And it’s not too late to jump into a year-long journey through scripture with Every Day Bible. You can start today at EveryDayBible.com, or—if you prefer—by downloading the Every Day Bible app for your Android or iOS device. The app is brilliantly simple—when you fire it up each day, you’ll jump right into the text with nothing new to learn or figure out.

So if this is your year to cultivate a big-picture view of scripture, the Every Day Bible app is ready to help.

Get this exceptional app—designed by the same team that brought you Logos 6—for free right now!

Keep Your Most Important New Year’s Resolution with Every Day Bible

every-day-bible-appIt’s resolution-making season. And to ensure your most important resolution—the one about daily Bible reading—is also the easiest to keep, we’d like you to meet the free Every Day Bible app.

Built on the reading-plan framework of Connect the Testaments, a popular calendar devotional written by Faithlife’s own John Barry and Rebecca Van Noord, Every Day Bible presents you with three manageable passages each day—one from the Old Testament, one from the New Testament, and one from the books of poetry. This approach will lead you through the entire Bible in a year. Along the way, you’ll garner a big-picture view of Scripture aided by Barry’s and Van Noord’s insights delivered in daily devotional passages.

The Every Day Bible app puts that powerful content in your pocket, so you can maintain your resolution to read Scripture even when the next year takes you unexpected places.

We kept it simple, so there’s nothing extra to learn and you can jump right into your Scripture readings each day. The result is a daily-reading app that’s easy to use. You still have total control over which types of text you’d like to read: use the settings menu to turn sections on and off if you’d prefer to focus on one particular type of text.

Each day is topped off with a piece of Bible Screen art from one of the verses covered that day. Our in-house professional design team has been illustrating a different Bible verse every day for years. Their work has taken many forms—apps, T-shirts, magnets, postcards—and we couldn’t resist putting it here to inspire you in your daily Scripture reading. And if you’d like to share the art, you can do that with just a click.

We think you’re going to love the brilliantly simple Every Day Bible app. Download it for free today, and start keeping that resolution to read Scripture.

A Chorus of Angels with Joy in Their Hearts

Luke 2:14
It’s easy to imagine what Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, or the Magi were thinking and feeling when they encountered the baby Jesus for the first time. I can imagine the mix of excitement, nerves, and expectation as they wondered when God would reveal the details of his plan and what kind of man this child would grow to be.

But have you ever thought what the angels of Luke 2 were thinking and feeling? I hadn’t until I read Rev. C.H. Spurgeon’s sermon on Luke 2:14 titled “The First Christmas Carol.”

Luke 2:14 records what the angels sang about the birth of Christ, overlooking a hillside full of sheep and shepherds. Spurgeon pointed out that, compared with the breadth of their experiences, this was a fairly humble job for a chorus of angels. These angels sang the soundtrack of creation, looking on as God spun into being all that we know. Several among their number had carried messages to kings and emperors. But on that night they carried a birth announcement to salt-of-the-earth people. And yet they didn’t hold back an ounce. They gave their highest praise. And Spurgeon said, “Methinks, they sang it with gladness in their eye; with their hearts burning with love, and with breasts as full of joy as if the good news to man had been good news to themselves.”

Why were the usually somber angels so delighted on that night? Because in the person of Jesus, all of God’s promises were fulfilled. All the attributes of God were manifest in a form that all men and women could see and experience for themselves. In the baby Jesus, God made himself accessible to us.

To the refrain they add, “. . . and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” Not since the garden had true peace with God been available to mankind. Since Adam’s sin, there had always been enmity between God and men. The sacrificial system carved out an unsteady ceasefire, but lasting peace was finally possible on the night that God closed the distance between heaven and earth. He came to us because we could not go to him.

So as you celebrate Christmas this year, carve out some time to celebrate like the angels did—by giving to God the highest praise of which you are capable, and reveling in the peace that he made possible for you and me.

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You can continue exploring Luke’s Gospel with this season’s exclusive Luke Christmas Collection, or save on other resources this Christmas that help you dig into God’s Word.

Faithlife Groups’ Collaborative Power Has Come to Logos 6

Faithlife-logoFaithlife Groups serve as the digital home for your faith community. They offer tremendous collaborative power, including document sharing, prayer listsnewsletters, and more!

With Logos 6, that power is now available directly inside the software through the Groups Tool.

You can find it in the tools menu alongside the other social tools. Just like any other tool in the menu, you can click to open or click, hold, and drag to a specific location in your workspace.


With the Groups Tool, you can easily interact with all of your groups. Just use the drop-down menu to quickly switch between groups. Inside each group, navigate between three view options: news, Community Notes, and documents. Reply to existing posts inline, or create a new post using the pencil in the top right corner.


The documents menu has long held the power to create useful Bible study documents. Faithlife Groups makes those documents collaborative. And now, thanks to the Groups Tool in Logos 6, that collaboration is possible without ever leaving your software.

And Faithlife Groups is chock-full of groups studying the Word together using Logos 6. You can join in with one of them or start a new one.

Let us recommend a Logos 6 base package to meet your study needs, then collaborate with your Faithlife Groups from within the software using the Groups Tool.

4 Faithlife Groups You Should Join Today

Faithlife-logoFaith communities are vital to healthy spirituality, so we built powerful tools for collaboration and sharing into Logos 6.

One of those tools—the Groups tool—brings Faithlife Groups’ collaborative power to Logos Bible Software. There are a number of groups that have sprung up as a way for Logos users to share their study techniques and insights. Many of these groups are all open, which means you can join them today!

Logos Author Collections

author_collectionsSearching a huge library like Logos 6 Gold for references to a specific topic, reference, or concept can sometimes yield thousands of results. One of the best ways to narrow your search is to create a set of personalized collections so you can search more manageable subsets of your Logos library.

I’ve found that some of the most useful collections are author based, and I created a group to share those custom collections. A few other Logos users—friends of mine whom I met through our community forums—have added their own, too. Logos Author Collections has a useful set of custom collections, and you can add them all to your library today by joining this group.

Logos Sample Documents

sampledocumentsResource collections are only one of fifteen distinct document types in Logos 6. To get a taste of what each of these documents can do, join the Logos Sample Documents group, which has a few examples of each document type. Some of the documents—like a passage list of the “one another” commands in Scripture and a visual filter for all the imperative verbs in the New Testament—make great starting points for new lines of Bible study.

Logos Library Theology/Denomination Tags

denominationalgroupiconMy favorite group is probably Logos Library Theology/Denomination Tags. A group of users worked for 18 months to create a comprehensive resource collection for every theological tradition, and this group is still working to tune their collections for accuracy and to account for new offerings as they’re added to Logos.com through Pre-Pub and Community Pricing. You can enjoy the fruit of their labor through this group.

Logos Product Collections

author_collectionsOne of our developers helped create resource collections for every base package, so you can search their library content easily and compare the different results from the various packages you own.

We’ve learned that many users prefer to build a diverse library by picking base packages from several of our denominational lines. For example: a users might combine Logos 6 Reformed Platinum, and Logos 6 Anglican Platinum to form the backbone of their research library. The Logos Product Collections group has resource collections for both so that you can individually search and compare each set of content.

Study with Logos 6 and collaborate with Faithlife Groups.

Master the 15 Document Types: Part 2

Logos 5’s documents menu gives you 11 different document types (and Documents.Logos.com reveals four more). Each one works a little differently, so you’ll always have the right tool for the job.

Last week we explored the first five; this week we’ll tackle the remaining ten.

To see examples of all 15 document types, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

6. Reading plan

Logos scores top marks as a research tool. Tagging powers some of the most useful searching available anywhere. Tools like Clause Search and the Bible Word Study eliminate thousands of hours spent flipping pages and scanning book indexes.

But if you’d like to read a book from cover to cover, Logos performs just as admirably, thanks to the reading-plan document type. Construct a reading plan for any book in your library on a schedule that fits your lifestyle. Reading plans are especially helpful on devotionals, like the one below that I built for Lent based on 40 Days to the Cross: Reflections from Great Thinkers.


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7. Sentence diagram

If, like many, you learned sentence diagramming on the first day of your hermeneutics class, you’ll love this document type. Import a passage in either an English translation or its original language, and use a huge set of tools to chart your way through the text. I particularly love the pencil tool, which interprets my squiggles into perfectly straight lines.


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8. Word-find puzzle

It’s not all hard work in the documents menu—the word-find puzzle turns a Scripture passage into an brain-expanding mental exercise that’s more a game than a study tool. It’s easy to use, and it’s great for the moments when you need to look up from your study and catch your breath. And if you teach a children’s Sunday school class, these puzzles will be a big hit!


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Note: These next two types—syntax search & visual filters—represent the overlap between the documents menu and your search tools. Both are search types that can be saved for later use or shared with others on Documents.Logos.com.

9. Syntax search

Find Syntax Search—a powerful language tool that empowers you to find particular sentence structures in Scripture—under the search menu. But since these searches are complex and take longer than usual to construct, you can also save your search parameters as a document.


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10. Visual filter

Perform a real-time search in the text of your Bible using a visual filter. You can create visual filters, then turn them on or off using the display menu (which looks like a Venn diagram) whenever you have a Bible open.

In the example below, I’ve created a visual filter that highlights all the imperative verbs, drawing attention to the call to action at the end of Peter’s sermon in Acts 2. I started with a new filter (created from the documents menu), switched over to “morph” search and typed an “@” in the search box. Logos suggested various parts of speech for me to choose from. I chose verb, and Logos suggested various tenses, voices, moods, and so on. I chose the imperative mood. In the final step, I chose the “On Fire” style for Logos to mark imperative verbs.


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11. Word list

Good Bible scholars spend hours tabulating the number of times a word is used in a particular passage. But a word-list document will do that for you in three clicks.

With a Bible and new word list open side by side, just highlight the passage you’re studying, and choose to “add from selected text.” From there, you can drag the various columns up to group the entire list according to that criteria.


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NOTE: These last four types do not appear in the documents menu, but you may see them on Documents.Logos.com.

12. Presentation

Your Proclaim presentations are stored and can be shared through Documents.Logos.com. If you haven’t used Proclaim, you can try it free for 30 days!

13. Resource collection

Create custom resource collections to quickly search subsections of your library. These subsections are then stored as resource collections on Documents.Logos.com, so you can share them with others.

A team from the Logos forums has created resource collections for virtually every denomination and belief tradition and made them available through their Faithlife group. You can benefit from their hard work right now!

And if you like that, you may also enjoy the Logos Author Collections group.

14. Guide template

Logos comes with five powerful done-for-you guides that search sections of your library with the right tools for the type of study you’re doing.

In addition to these five, you can create your own guides, mixing and matching tools suit your study needs. For example, I have a guide that searches all of my collections grouped by author, so I can quickly get an overview of what particular scholars have to say about a subject or passage. I have another guide that searches my collections grouped by denomination, so I can get an overview of how different faith traditions handle a subject or passage.

15. Highlighting palette

Logos comes loaded with several highlighting palettes, but you may prefer to create your own—perhaps matching the colors you’ve used for years in your favorite paper Bible. Your custom highlighting palette becomes a document that you can share with others on Documents.Logos.com.

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Get a Logos 5 base package today and get access to thousands of Bible study resources, plus powerful study tools like these 15 document types.

To see examples of each document type, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

Master the 15 Document Types: Part 1

Note-taking remains central to both personal Bible study and sermon preparation. Whether you’re journaling through the New Testament in your daily devotions, preparing to lead a small group, or doing research for your dissertation, Logos offers powerful, intuitive note-taking tools to improve every facet of your Bible study.

The documents menu in Logos 5 gives you 11 different document types (and Documents.Logos.com reveals four more). Each one works a little differently, so you’ll always have the right tool for the job.

To demonstrate the power of these documents, we created a Faithlife Group with samples of each document type—join right now to see them all!


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There are also four other document types that don’t appear in this menu, but may appear at Documents.Logos.com. Over the next two weeks, we’ll explore the capabilities of each—starting today with the first six types listed in the documents menu.

1. Bibliography

Logos 5 makes it easy to create, edit, sort, and print (or export) bibliographies for publication or personal reference. You can add citations from seven source types (I use “history” most often).

Students, rejoice—if you build a bibliography in MLA only to learn that your professor expects Turabian, don’t worry—you can switch between styles with a click.

Exporting or printing a bibliography is easy, too: just click the panel menu or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl/Command + P.


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2. Clippings

When you come across an insight you want to remember, turn to clippings—the fastest way to store definitions, ideas, observations, and other fragments of text.

It’s easy: create a new clippings document, then right click text to set it aside for later. The clippings document will remember exactly where you found everything, so you can cite all your sources. You can even add tags (to make clippings searchable) and notes.


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3. Notes

Logos’ notes make it easy to mark up your books. Just like writing in the margins, you can add your own thoughts and observations to personalize every book in your library—except in Logos notes, you’ll never run out of writing room.

Notes and clippings are very similar. Personally, I use clippings to gather insights from my library into one place while I study or prepare to preach. I use notes to store a searchable copy for a final product—like a sermon manuscript, a completed article, or a position paper.

Notes attached to Scripture references will place an inline icon across all your devices. Hover over it to preview the note, and click to open it.


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4. Passage list

This is the most helpful document when you’re studying systematically through a single topic or theme. Use search to find all the references of a specific word or phrase, and store the results for analysis.

The passage list really shines when you toggle over to memorization mode—you can use it to memorize a list of verses by progressively hiding more words as you become more familiar with the text.


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5. Prayer list

Prayer lists help you keep your promises to pray for friends or family. You can add requests, set the frequency, and share your lists in a Faithlife Group or at Documents.Logos.com. You can even record answers, so you’ll always have a record of God’s faithfulness in your life.


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Join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife Group to see more examples of all 15 document types.

We’ll cover the remaining document types next week—stay tuned for part 2!

Win Logos 5 Gold: Limited Time Remaining!

Christian Discourse

Last week you learned that you could win Logos 5 Gold (a $1,549.95 value) by sharing your biblical insight on ChristianDiscourse.com.

We’ll have a winner on September 16 at midnight (EDT). The person who shares the most from Christian Discourse to Facebook or Twitter before then will win Logos 5 Gold or an upgrade equivalent. And four runners-up will win the 13-volume Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection (a $534.95 value).

Right now, Christian Discourse users are discussing important topics, from Bible questions to ministry methods to current events. And just for participating in these discussions, you’ll get the chance to win a massive biblical and theological library—a suite of powerful tools that will help you explore these questions in your own studies.

Plus, four runners-up will win the 13-volume Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, which summarizes the Pauline writings in an easy-to-follow format. These unique books distill the most relevant and helpful content on this subject so that you can quickly find what you need. Four runners-up will win a free copy of this collection just for sharing their insights—and you could be one of them.

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Christian Discourse is a place for honest conversations about the things that matter most. It’s designed to guide you in exploring Christianity through discussion. You’ll find conversations on theology, apologetics, devotional thoughts, Bible questions, and more—all tied to Christian living. Discover biblical insights from followers of Christ on our culture’s most pertinent issues and our world’s most pressing troubles.

The best part: you can join in and contribute to the discussion. Your thoughts and concerns matter—Christian Discourse is a safe place to share them with your family in Christ.

Join the conversation today!