Bob to Speak at Room2Think on January 27

Today’s guest blogger is Kent Hendricks, the main Pre-Pub man here at Logos.

When he’s not thinking about Bible software, Bob Pritchett, the co-founder and CEO of Logos Bible Software, speaks to business and academic groups around the country.

On Tuesday, January 27, from 4-6 PM, Bob will be speaking at Room2Think here in Bellingham, Washington. Room2Think is the most creative and innovative meeting space in our area, and this will be a great chance to meet business leaders from the community and network with others.

Bob will be presenting on “Entrepreneurial Lessons from the Frontline,” topics taken from his book, Fire Someone Today, And Other Surprising Tactics for Making Your Business a Success. (The book is based on mistakes and successes at Logos Bible Software over the years. You’ll find reviews at Amazon.com.)

The event is $25 and includes wine and cheese, tasty treats from Old World Deli in downtown Bellingham, a copy of Bob’s book, and an opportunity to connect with others from the community. If you live in the Bellingham area, you won’t want to miss this.

Space is limited, so register now to reserve your spot! View the PDF invitation for all the details. If you have any questions, simply send an email to Room2Think at info@room2think.com or call 360-778-3635.

We hope to see you there!

Spurgeon Lovers, It’s Coming!

Charles Spurgeon Collection (78 Vols.)Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92), the “Prince of Preachers,” is regarded by many as the most important Baptist preacher of the last two centuries. According to some, he may very well have been the greatest preacher in the history of the church.

His sermons, which drew crowds by the thousands, are still widely read today, and nearly all of his writings remain in print and provide help to myriads of Christians all over the globe.

But though his sermons have been published as a set, which we have available in the companion Complete Spurgeon Sermon Collection, until now there has been no attempt to publish a comprehensive collection of Spurgeon’s writings like has been done with the works of other historically significant people like Luther, Knox, Bunyan, Owen, Wesley, Edwards, and many others.

In the Charles Spurgeon Collection, we bring you what is to our knowledge the most comprehensive collection of Spurgeon’s non-sermonic material available anywhere. It presently* totals 78 87 volumes and 17,361 18,719 pages and is on Pre-Pub for only $249.95 $259.95. That’s just over $3 per volume. Assembling this massive collection in print would cost you at least two to three times as much.

In the Charles Spurgeon Collection, you’ll get

  • The Treasury of David, Spurgeon’s 7-vol. commentary on the Psalms
  • Spurgeon’s 4-vol. Lectures to My Students, which includes his best-selling Commenting and Commentaries
  • 228 issues of Spurgeon’s magazine, The Sword and the Trowel (1865-84)
  • Spurgeon’s 4-vol. Sermon Notes
  • the 2-volume Salt Cellars
  • Spurgeon’s 4-vol. Autobiography, the first and most detailed account of Spurgeon’s life and ministry
  • a collection of Spurgeon’s letters and correspondence
  • dozens of additional volumes on preaching, prayer, evangelism, and much more!

*And it gets even better. I said presently above because we’re still in the process of researching another dozen or so titles for possible inclusion in this collection. The best part is that if you pre-order now, you’ll be locked in at the lowest possible price, even if the price goes up to cover the additional cost.

So pre-order this unparalleled collection of the writings of C. H. Spurgeon now (and his sermons, too, if you don’t already have them), and get ready to take advantage of the power of Logos to integrate this wealth of material into your devotions, Bible studies, and sermons with ease.

Update (07/09/09): We’ve added 9 new titles to the collection, bringing the total up to 87!

“This is the greatest thing I own.”

Today’s guest post is from Andrew Pritchett, who works in our Ministry Relations department.

Bible Study Library (ND)The other night I had one of the greatest experiences I have had working here at Logos Bible Software. On Tuesday night I stopped by my neighborhood coffee house. As I was waiting I noticed some familiar faces. One of the familiar faces was an older man I had always presumed to be homeless. We’ll call him John. John wore a big white beard, a thick hat, and combat fatigues and carried all of his belongings with him.

As I looked around the room, something caught my eye on John’s computer screen. It was the familiar Passage Guide in Logos. I moved toward him and said, “I like your choice in Bible software.” John smiled and pointed at the logo on my shirt. He said, “This is the greatest thing I own.” I thanked him, and he asked me a quick question about using the Compare Bible Versions tool inside the program. When I asked if he had time for me to update his computer, he said, “This is where I spend my evenings.”

[Read more...]

33,719 Pages of Eminently Quotable Writings

Today’s guest post is from Jana Gering, Project Manager of the Electronic Text Development department.

The teaching pastor at a church I worked for a few years ago asked the staff for stories and ideas about an upcoming sermon dealing with a section of scripture on pride. The first thing to come to my mind was the chapter on pride from C. S. Lewis’ book Mere Christianity. I looked up the chapter to find some quotes for my email response; I began by typing out a few of the quotes and ended by transcribing almost the whole of that incredible chapter! Lewis’ pithy writing defies summary, so the email turned out be a list of about 15 lengthy quotes from the chapter. The pastor tried to summarize them, too, but the impact of the text was such that in the end, he posted all of the quotes on slides and discussed them during the sermon.

As the manager of the small bookstore at the church, I can testify that we sold out of all Lewis books and put in many backorders that Sunday. The power of Lewis’ written words struck a note with many who otherwise may never have read them. The power of enduring authors—writers of fiction, playwrights, philosophers, and poets as well as theologians—can add a truly powerful punch to your studies and messages.

Right now, the massive 71-volume Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection, which contains a whopping 33,719 pages of classic writings, is on Pre-Pub for only $99.95. To quote from the product page, “When Charles William Eliot assembled The Harvard Classics, more commonly known as ‘The Five-Foot Shelf,’ and later the ‘Shelf of Fiction,’ he gathered this epic collection of key works which he thought would best represent ‘the progress of man . . . from the earliest historical times to the close of the nineteenth century.’”

While C.S. Lewis’ works are too new to be published in this set, biographies, philosophical and scientific essays, stories, plays, poetry, and whole or excerpted keynote works from throughout history are included:

“Men despise religion; they hate it and fear it is true.” —Pensee 174

“The immortality of the soul is a matter which is of so great consequence to us and which touches us so profoundly that we must have lost all feeling to be indifferent as to knowing what it is. . . .” —Pensee 194

—Blaise Pascal, Pensees

“A noble man compares and estimates himself by an idea which is higher than himself; and a mean man, by one lower than himself. The one produces aspiration; the other ambition, which is the way in which a vulgar man aspires.”

—Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“Avarice, envy, pride, Three fatal sparks, have set the hearts of all On Fire.”

—Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times.”

Martin Luther

“Do you wish to be great? Then begin by being. Do you desire to construct a vast and lofty fabric? Think first about the foundations of humility. The higher your structure is to be, the deeper must be its foundation.”

Saint Augustine

“A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience.”

“Alas! All music jars when the soul’s out of tune.”

—Miguel Cervantes

Imagine having not only your biblical and theological works at your fingertips through Libronix, but also a complete university course in the history of original authors from ancient times through the 19th century!

French philosopher Étienne Gilson wrote that “history is the only laboratory we have in which to test the consequences of thought.” Secular or religious, fiction or nonfiction, prose or poetry, this classic collection gives insight into the history, culture, art, and consequences of ideas as expressed by the written word. And so, since “Brevity is the soul of wit,” (William Shakespeare in Hamlet), and I’ve already passed up my word count (and probably my wit as well!), I’ll leave you to discover the merits of the collection yourself at the Pre-Pub page.

Haddon Robinson and Discourse Grammar, Part 2

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction to Discourse Features for Teaching and Exegesis.

Haddon Robinson is known for what has been called “Big Idea Preaching” based on the importance he places on preaching the central concept of a passage instead of merely the supporting ideas. The key to preaching the big idea is finding the big idea. He cites a really great example from Hebrews 10:19-25. Below is the text in the ESV.

19 Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus, 20 by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh, 21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22 let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. 23 Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. 24 And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, 25 not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.

There are a whole gaggle of ideas in this passage. It can be tricky to unpack it properly.

One of the primary goals of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament and the Lexham High Definition New Testament is to help guide you through the process of digesting the grammar and structure of a passage. In the case of Hebrews 10, vv. 19-21 play the role of setting the state for the big idea that is given in v. 22. When passages get as complex as this, it is a real challenge to successfully find your way through to the big idea.

Now take a look at the same passage in the HDNT:

The “Complex” label on the left tells you that you are headed into a passage that has a lot happening. The “Principle” line is the main idea of the complex sentence, indicated by being indented only one level. All of the other supporting elements like the bullets, sub-points and elaboration are indented at least two places. The labels also help you understand what each of these parts is doing. The grayed text indicates backgrounding, information that helps to set the stage for the main idea, but is backgrounded to make sure the main idea is not missed.

If you are looking for some great resources for preaching, I would encourage you to look at a the Baker Preaching Collection, which is currently on Pre-Pub. If you want to learn more about discourse and its practical application to the New Testament, check out my forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament. It provides all the background you have wanted to know about the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament and the HDNT.

See also Haddon Robinson and Discourse Grammar, Part 1.

Logos for Mac Training Videos

If you recently purchased one of our Mac base packages or crossgraded from the Windows version and are looking for some help getting setup or simply want to get acquainted with what Logos for Mac can do to help improve your Bible study, be sure to check out the seven new training videos that are now available on our videos page at MacBibleSoftware.com.

Here’s what you’ll find so far:

We hope you find these videos helpful. Be sure to check back later. There are many more training videos to come.

For additional help, see the Logos for Mac FAQs.

Devotions for the New Year

There’s no replacement for reading the Bible. But there are some very good supplements.

Last week Ryan talked about how you can read the Bible this year with people all over the world using our Global Bible Reader or the new Bible reading plans at Bible.Logos.com. Both are great ways to read the Bible while learning from and sharing with other believers.

If you just want to read by yourself or want to customize your own reading plan, there is the Bible reading feature in the Windows version of Logos. Rather than repeating what I wrote last year, I’ll let you check it out for yourself if you want to learn some tips for creating a reading plan in Logos for 2009.

Another feature in Logos for Windows that I’d encourage you to consider using this year is the Devotions section on the home page. Books whose content is arranged by day of the year are automatically added to the list of available devotional readings that you can choose from.

Here’s just a sampling of the scores of devotional books we have:

To add a book to your daily devotional reading, simply click “Customize View” on home page, scroll down to the Devotions section, and check the box next to Devotions and any of the books that you’d like to read through over the next year. Every day the next devotional will be waiting for you. Just click it to open the current day’s reading.

Some other devotional books that don’t span an entire year but are worth checking out include John Piper’s A Godward Life, Life As a Vapor, and Pierced by the Word.

We trust that God would encourage your faith this year as your read His Word and meditate on its relevance for your life.

Tip from CS: Update from the Logos Library System to Libronix

LLS LogoBack in the early 90s, before the days of the Libronix Digital Library System (LDLS), there was the Logos Library System (LLS). Version 1 shipped in December of 1991, and version 2 followed in August of 1995.

In 2001 we shipped our brand new platform, the Libronix Digital Library System, which replaced the Logos Library System. It is far more robust with loads of added functionality. LDLS has now gone through three versions (version 1 in December of 2001, version 2 in July of 2003, and version 3 in May of 2006), with development of the next version well underway.

Even though the Logos Library System is more than 13 years old, we still have many customers using it. Perhaps you’re one of them. The Logos Library System is an excellent tool for Bible study, but it is important for people who have not yet updated to our Libronix Digital Library System to consider making the switch now.

There are several important reasons to move to Libronix:

  1. First, it’s free! You can update to the new core engine for Windows at no cost. It won’t replace your existing Logos Library System, so you can run both of them as you learn the new system.
  2. Second, you’re missing out on a huge number of amazing and powerful new tools and resources that come with our Logos Bible Software 3 base packages. Give us a call at 800-875-6467 to get a special customized upgrade price based on what LLS package you own.
  3. Third, LLS was originally designed for Windows 95 and Windows 98. It’s a 16-bit application and will not work on 64-bit operating systems like the 64-bit versions of XP and Vista. 64-bit is fast on its way to becoming the norm for all new computer purchases. Though Windows 7 won’t be 64-bit only, it is very likely that the next version of Windows will be. The majority of new machines from Dell and HP now come standard with the 64-bit version of Vista, which means that if you purchase a new machine, you’d likely have to run LLS on an older dedicated computer or use virtualization software like Virtual PC, Virtual Box, or Parallels Workstation. The best solution is simply to update to Libronix.
  4. Finally, Libronix is now available for Mac. If you’ve moved to the Mac platform, our new Mac version is a much better alternative to running LLS via virtualization. You can simply purchase our Mac engine and immediately have access to most of your old LLS resources native on your Mac—or better yet, upgrade to one of our Mac base packages!

If you’re ready to make the switch, we’re happy to help you get your existing resources working in our Libronix Digital Library System. Our desire is to have all of our customers ready to use their Logos Bible Software when they upgrade to a new computer, whether that computer is Windows or Mac based. Especially here in Customer Service we have the knowhow to help you get from wherever you are to wherever you want to be.

Give us a call at 800-875-6467, or email us at cs@logos.com. We look forward to helping you get the best tools for Bible study—and make sure that your digital library is ready for the future.

What’s in Your Bible?

What's in Your Bible? Find out at BibleStudyMagazine.comIf you got a copy of the first issue of Bible Study Magazine (November-December 2008), you probably saw the super cool canon chart put together by our own Vincent Setterholm (pages 47-48). It nicely compares the Protestant, Ethiopian, Syriac, Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Hebrew, and Samaritan canons and provides lots of helpful explanatory material.

More cool charts and graphs like this are coming in future issues. The January-February issue has a chart from Mike Heiser on the Ten Commandments. To be sure that you don’t miss out on great content like this in the future, be sure to subscribe.

For those of you who missed the canon chart, we’ve made a really cool version of it available on BibleStudyMagazine.com. Check it out, and drop a mention of it on your blog if you find it helpful. Just paste the code from the code box at the bottom of the page into your blog editor.

If you prefer to have this chart in print, you can still pick up a copy of the first issue for only $2.95—or even better, get it for free! All you need to do is write a brief review of Bible Study Magazine on your blog or website or in print. Find out all the details in our previous blog post.

By the way, if you’re looking for a good book on the canon, check out F. F. Bruce’s The Canon of Scripture.

Logos.com Gets New Search!

Logos.com just got a whole lot better. We launched some powerful new search functionality along with greatly improved search results.

New Searching

To be quite honest, our previous search on our website wasn’t the best at helping you find what you were looking for unless you knew the exact title or author of the product. A search for something like Grudem theology would turn up no results. Now that same search finds exactly what you’re probably looking for: Grudem’s Systematic Theology.

The default functionality used to be a quote search. It would find only the exact words you typed and in the order that you typed them. Since “Grudem theology” never appears exactly that way on our site, you wouldn’t get any hits. Now our search by default does an OR search. It will find any place where either Grudem or theology occur. It also does stemming, which means that it will find Grudem and theological too. You’ll now get plenty of search results with the best matches on top.

Want to narrow your results? No problem. The new search at Logos.com now recognizes the AND search operator. So you can search for something like Geisler AND apologetics or MacArthur AND Romans. You can also perform standard quote searches as well, like “works of jonathan edwards”. This gives you full control over what our search engine finds for you, but usually just entering in a couple of words and hitting enter should bring you very relevant and targeted results.

Misspell a word in your search? No problem. We now suggest the correct spelling for you! For example, if you search for John McArthur, we’ll ask you, “Did you mean John MacArthur?” Clicking that text will then perform the search you meant to perform. Cool, huh? (And notice that even the search with the misspelling gives you some pretty good results too!)

That’s not all. The new search also recognizes fields like author, title, and description so you can perform some very powerful searches just like you can in Logos Bible Software. Here are some examples:

New Search Results

Just as exciting as the powerful new searching is what we’ve done to the search results. We’ve added the ability to sort search results by several different criteria. The default search order is by relevance, but you can also sort by price, author, and title.

All search results are now conveniently divided into two sections: products and support. Looking to add something to your library? Then products is what you want. Looking to learn how to use Logos better with a video or support article, then support is what you want. By default, we’ll show you both products and support. Just click either word in the top left to filter the results.

Oh, one last thing–blog posts are now indexed as well, so if you’re searching for help on something, you’ll see all the great support articles at Logos.com as well as the relevant blog posts from here on the blog. No need to come here and search the blog separately.

We really hope you enjoy this powerful new functionality, and we welcome your feedback on ways we can make searching at Logos.com even better.

What are you waiting for? Go give it a try!