Logos 5: Attach Notes to Headwords

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Last week’s blog post about adding notes to verses generated some questions and comments, so I’m following up with a similar discussion about adding notes to headwords.

I’ll introduce the subject with a personal story. I remember years ago when I first started studying Scripture, every topic was brand new to me. As I studied passages, I investigated individual words and topics like Paul, redemption, Corinth, kosmos, and on and on. For every subject or word, I read articles in dictionaries, encyclopedias, and lexicons recording my findings on paper. Inevitably in a few weeks, I’d come across the same topic or word in a different text, so I’d either rifle through paper looking for my previous findings or start the study from scratch again. Digging a deep well from which to draw water was slow going for me in the beginning.

With my testimony as a backdrop, imagine every time you study an English, Hebrew, or Greek word, you deposit your discoveries safely in a notes document. Then the next time you study that same word, Logos will indicate that you’ve been down that road before, and with the click of a button, all of your previous research will be available to you!

Here’s how to do just that:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the Notes file something like “English Words” (A)
  • Open a Bible to a passage like Acts 4:36, in which Barnabas is mentioned (B)
  • Double click the word Barnabas to open a dictionary article about him (C)

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  • Right click anywhere within that article (D)
  • Select Headword Barnabas from the right-click menu (E)
  • Select Add a note to “English Words” (or whatever you named the notes document) (F)

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  • Notice that Logos creates a note in the file named Barnabas (G)
  • Also notice that Logos places a note indicator next to the headword in your dictionary (H)
  • Add all your research about Barnabas to the content box (I)

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  • Continue to add more text to this same content box as you conduct your normal research about Barnabas throughout various books
  • Close all the panels except your Bible
  • Pretend it is now weeks into the future
  • Take your Bible to Galatians 2:1, in which Barnabas is referenced again (J)
  • Right click the word Barnabas (K)
  • Select Selection Barnabas (L)
  • Select a resource, other than the one you previously opened, from the menu (M)

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  • Notice it opens to an article about Barnabas (N)
  • Look what is next to the headword in the dictionary: a note indicator saying you’ve studied this word or subject before
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a preview of your content (O)

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  • Click the indicator to open the note

Since you added the note to the headword, every topical book containing an article with the headword Barnabas will have an indicator pointing to your notes document!

I encourage you also to create notes documents named “Hebrew Words” and “Greek Words“. With these files created, follow the same steps as you study Hebrew and Greek words. Over time, you’ll end up with your own personal “dictionaries” with riches you’ve mined from various resources!

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.

Logos 5: Attach Notes to Verses

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I recently received a question from a Logos user that I answer frequently, so I want to address it again. The question was basically this:

My understanding is when I create a note for a verse, the note indicator is to appear next to that verse in all of my Bibles. However, I’m only seeing the indicator in the Bible in which I first created the note. What’s happening?

This is a very common scenario, so we’ll patiently walk through it from the beginning.

Let’s imagine we’re going to study the book of Mark, verse by verse. As we gain insights, we want to record them in a notes document next to the corresponding verses. In addition, we want those notes to appear in all of our Bibles.

Here’s how to accomplish that task:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like Mark Notes (A)
  • Open any Bible to Mark 1:1 (B)

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  • Right click any word in Mark 1:1 (C)
  • Select Reference Mark 1:1 (THIS IS THE KEY: You must choose Reference so the note will attach to that verse regardless of the Bible you’re in. If you choose Selection “the word”, the note is only attached to that word in that Bible.) (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Mark Notes” (E)

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Notice what just happened:

  • A note named Mark 1:1 was created in the notes document (F)
  • A note indicator was placed next to Mark 1:1 in the Bible (G)

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  • The note indicator will appear in all versified books, primarily Bibles and commentaries, containing an entry for Mark 1:1 (H)

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  • Add Content for the Mark 1:1 note (I)

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  • Repeat these steps for each verse as you move through Mark (J)

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  • Close the notes document, but notice the indicators remain in the Bible (K)
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to preview the note’s content (L)

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  • Click the indicator to open the notes document

By following these steps, at the end of your research you’ll basically have a personal study Bible for Mark that will be saved and synchronized across your various devices.

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.

Logos 5: Ellipses in the Reverse Interlinear

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A friend and fellow Logos user recently emailed me the following scenario:

I came to John 1:34 in my study of the subject of election. As I looked at the verse in the NASB reverse interlinear, I noticed a dot (bullet) between the words “the” and “son”. What does that mean?

This is an excellent observation and question. First, I’ll set up what he was viewing.

  • Open the NASB to John 1:34 (A)
  • Notice the verse says “. . . this is the Son of God” (B)

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  • Click the Display link on the Bible’s toolbar (C)
  • Select InlineSurface, and Lemma (dictionary form of a word) (D)

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  • Notice the verse now reads “. . . this is the • Son of God” (E)
  • Look underneath the bullet and you’ll see a Greek lemma (F)

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In the reverse interlinear, this bullet represents an ellipsis.

The bullet may appear on the English line of text, meaning an original Hebrew or Greek word wasn’t translated in the English Bible, or the bullet may be on the lemma line, indicating an English word was inserted for clarification or smooth reading.

Even though the specific lemma wasn’t translated in John 1:34 in the NASB, with the interlinear information displayed, the lemma line is an active line of text.

  • Right click the bullet (G)
  • Select Lemma (H)
  • Select Search this resource (I)

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Look carefully at the search results, which display every occurrence of this word in the Greek text on which the English Bible is based, whether it’s translated in English or not (J).

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A situation like this may raise more questions than it answers, but Logos guides and resources can help:

  • Generate an Exegetical Guide (Guides | Exegetical Guide) for John 1:34 and pay close attention to the Apparatuses section, containing resources pointing out differences in the original language texts (K)
  • Generate a Passage Guide (Guides | Passage Guide)  for John 1:34, and in the Commentaries section, locate critical or textual commentaries you may own, which normally explain the variances in the original-language texts (L)

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While this scenario certainly isn’t an everyday occurrence in your Bible study, when you do come across an ellipsis, you know there’s some assistance for you in Logos.

If you’re looking for more assistance in navigating reverse interlinears, check out our other training materials.

Logos 5: Exploring Lemmas with the Same Root

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented this question to me:

I’ve noticed Logos includes the root words for Greek lemmas in English Bibles with the reverse interlinear. How might these root words be used in actual Bible study?

Excellent question! While this blog post will certainly not exhaust all that could be said, hopefully a few insights may get you started using this tool.

First, let’s begin with a few definitions

  • The manuscript form of a word refers to the actual word the biblical author used.
  • The lemma or lexical form of a word refers to how the word is “looked up” or referenced in a traditional dictionary of lexicon.
  • The root is the word from which the lemma is derived.

In very simple terms, manuscript forms are derived from lemmas, which are derived from roots.

Let’s explore this more with a specific biblical example found in Galatians 6:1, in which Paul instructs: 

. . . if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness . . .

  • Open the ESV to Galatians 6:1 (A)
  • Right click the word restore (B)
  • Select Root | Search this resource (C)

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  • Click Aligned in the search panel (D) to see in a center column the various ways different lemmas with the same root are translated in English (E)

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  • Click Analysis to display a spreadsheet of the results (F)
  • Right click on a column header (G)
  • Select at least these categories: Reference, Lemma (Greek), Result, and Sense (please note that Sense does not appear in all Logos base packages) (H)

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  • Drag one at a time Lemma (Greek) and Sense to the top of the spreadsheet (I) in order to group the results according to these categories (J)

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Here’s what you’re viewing in the spreadsheet:

  • The various NT Greek lemmas derived from the same root (K)
  • The various ways the lemmas are translated in the ESV (L)
  • The sense or contextual meaning of each lemma (M)
  • Different senses or meanings for the same lemma (N)

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As you work with these results please keep these cautions in mind:

  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning as its root
  • Don’t automatically assume lemmas derived from the same root share the same meaning
  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning in every place it occurs in Scripture

With these cautions firmly in mind, it’s interesting to observe that running throughout the related lemmas are the ideas of repaircorrectprepareequip, and mature. Perhaps these lemmas and meanings provide further insights into the concept of restoring in Galatians 6:1.

By combining a search for the root and the Analysis view of the results, you can explore in detail the various facets of a word!

If this was helpful to you, check out our other training materials to help you master your Logos software.

Logos 5: Reorder Books in a Collection

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In a recent blog post about displaying a verse from all Bibles, I suggested creating a collection of English Bibles. This suggestion in turn generated some discussion about the order of books in a collection. If you’ve created a collection from the Tools menu, you’ve noticed that Logos alphabetizes the resources in a collection.

To illustrate, in a theology-books collection, Baker’s Dictionary of Practical Theology appears before Concise Theology because B is of course before C (A).

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When using this collection, therefore, in a search, the Baker results appear before the Concise hits (B).

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The question then is, how can we move the Concise ahead of the Baker yet leave them both in the collection? The answer is: rename Concise. This method is a little tedious, but it does accomplish the goal.

  • Click the Library icon
  • Click the Resource information icon on the library’s toolbar (C)
  • Type title:theology in the library’s Find box to display resources with theology in the title (D)
  • Click something other than the title of Concise Theology in the viewing area (E) to display the book in the Resource information pane (F)
  • Click the Edit (pencil) icon next to the title in the Resource information pane (G)
  • Type the numeral 1 in front of the title in the Edit box so the name of the book is now 1 Concise Theology (H)

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  • Press the Enter key to save the name
  • Repeat this process with other theology books using the numerals 2, 3, 4 etc. (I)

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  • Close the Library
  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection Theology Books (J)
  • In the Rule box, type title:theology to list resources with theology in the title (K)
    (Please note: this is not a complete rule to locate all theology books, but used just for illustration purposes.)
  • Notice that the resources with numbers in their names are now at the top of the list (L)

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To see this newly ordered collection in action, generate a basic search in Theology Books and notice which books appear at the top of the list! (M)

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Of course, you can use this same method to reorder books in any collection, such as History Books, Ethics Books, or others. This method ensures that your favorite books always appear at the top of your search results.

Logos 5: Locate Words and Phrases in Proximity to One Another

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In addition to coaching people in the use of Logos Bible Software, one of my greatest joys is encouraging biblical communicators toward true expository preaching. Exposing the original intent of a scriptural passage along with contemporary application is a powerful combination!

Toward that end, a Logos user recently asked me how he could search his library for various definitions of expository preaching.

This is an excellent question that can be answered with a proximity search combining words and phrases:

  • Open the Search panel (A)
  • Select Basic as the search type (B)
  • Select Entire Library from the resources drop-down list (C)
  • Type this text in the Find box: (definition,define) WITHIN 3 words “expository preaching” (D)

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  • Choose the search panel menu (E)
  • Select Match all word forms (F)

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  • Press the Enter key to generate the search results (G)

The search query instructs Logos to locate all the occurrences of the words define, defines, defined, defining, definition, or definitions within three words of the phrase expository preaching!

Clicking a hyperlinked search result opens the resource right to an author’s definition of expository preaching. (H)

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Here are some details regarding the search query:

  • The parentheses group terms together
  • The comma within the parentheses represents an OR search, meaning any of the terms present constitutes a hit
  • Match all word forms locates the various forms of define, saving us from having to type them individually
  • The double quotes around the words expository preaching indicate an exact phrase
  • The command WITHIN means the words can appear before or after the phrase
  • The term words designates the context in which the words and phrases must appear
  • The number 3 defines the specific contextual range in which the words and phrases must appear

Please experiment with this query, because joining the proximity search with words and phrases enables us to locate information with precision.

If this was helpful to you, check out our Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which contains greatly expanded explanations of Logos searching.

Logos 5: Cross‑References for Topics

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the most popular types of Bible study enjoyed by many Christians is cross-reference work. Toward that end, most English Bibles provide some cross-references inline with the biblical text.

If you enjoy this method of Bible investigation, you may find that those embedded cross-references are limited. So if you’d like to look up more biblical references for a given topic, try this setup that incorporates several Logos features:

  • Click the Library icon to open your electronic bookshelf (A)
  • Click Prioritize in the upper right corner of the library (B)

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  • Type nave in the Library’s Find box (C)
  • Drag New Nave’s Topical Bible to the Prefer these resources list (make sure this resource is in the top five of your topical prioritized books, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias) (D)

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  • Open an English Bible, such as The Lexham English Bible (E)
  • Navigate in the Bible to a passage containing a topic of interest, such as Colossians 2:14 (F)

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  • Right click on a word in the verse, such as cross (G)
  • Click Selection: cross on the right side of the context menu (H)
  • Select New Nave’s Topical Bible on the left side of the context menu (I)

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  • Notice this resource opens to an article containing numerous cross-references for the topic cross (J)
  • Rest the cursor on a blue Bible cross-reference to see a popup of that verse from your preferred Bible (K)

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  • Click a blue Bible cross-reference to open your preferred Bible to that verse

To see multiple cross-references at once, add this to your study:

  • Choose Tools | Power Lookup
  • Select some text containing cross-references in Nave’s (L)
  • Notice that Power Lookup displays the biblical text for all of those selected cross-references (M)

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If you find yourself using this setup frequently, make sure to save it as layout.

For more helpful instruction about Logos tools, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set.

Logos 5: Display a Verse from All Bibles

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Recently I was reading Revelation 3:20 in the ESV, where Jesus says:

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me.”

I noticed in to being used as the phrase, rather than the word into. To refresh my English grammar, I quickly looked up the difference between in to and into.

I then wanted to see how this verse is worded in all of my English Bibles. There are several ways to accomplish this task in Logos, but I’ll show you what I did that evening in my personal study.

First, I created a collection of English Bibles, then I used Text Comparison to display Revelation 3:20 from that collection:

  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection “English Bibles” (A)
  • Type this text in the Rule box: type:bible AND lang:english, which encompasses resources categorized in the library as Bibles published in the English language (B)
  • Close the Collections panel (C)

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  • Choose the Tools menu
  • Right click Text Comparison (D)
  • Select Open in a floating window (E)

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  • Type Revelation 3:20 in the Reference box (F)
  • Select English Bibles from the Resources drop-down list (G)

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  • Choose the Text Comparison panel menu (H)
  • Select Vertical layout (I)

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Notice that Logos displays a list of that one verse from all the English Bibles you own!

If you’d like to continue this study, use the Search tool to locate all the occurrences of both the phrase in to and the word into in your Bible.

If you enjoy these weekly tips, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which teaches you how to get the most out of your software.

Logos 5: Record Your Answers in Logos Resources

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Have you noticed that much of our learning takes places through a question and answer model? When I became a Christian disciple in college, my pastor began mentoring me with the Design for Discipleship series from The Navigators. Using study guides filled with questions, I would read the Scripture and then record my answers in the space provided in the guides.

Logos tries to replicate this question and answer experience with text entry boxes scattered throughout numerous Logos resources.

Allow me to give you a specific example:

  • Click the title of the book in the list underneath the Command box to open it (B)

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  • Type 150 in the resource’s reference box (C)

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  • Press the Enter key to jump to page 150 (D)
  • Scroll until you see the section called Questions for Reflection (E)
  • Notice the text entry boxes underneath the questions (F)

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  • Type your desired text in the boxes just like you would record answers on lines in study guides (G)

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Currently this text is not searchable, but it does synchronize between your devices.

Be on the lookout for these text entry boxes all throughout your Logos resources, especially the ones containing questions!

If you enjoy these weekly tips, check out the Logos Bible Software Training Manual Bundle (print edition), which contains hundreds of pages on getting the most out of your software.

Logos 5: See Synonyms in Bible Word Study

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented me with this scenario:

As I was reading Luke 4:5 where Satan showed Jesus the kingdoms of the world, I was a little surprised to notice the Greek word for “world” was not “kosmos”, the word normally used for “world” in the New Testament. Is there a quick way to see all of the Greek words translated with the same English word?

This is an excellent question, and the answer is a resounding yes!

Using the above example, I’ll show you how to access a quick list of synonyms for world:

  • Open an English Bible with the reverse-interlinear option, such as the ESV (A)
  • Navigate to Luke 4:5 (B)
  • Right click the word world (C)
  • Select Selection world | Bible Word Study (D)

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  • Scroll in the newly generated report to the section called Greek Words (E)
  • Notice the English word world in the center of the translation ring (F) and the Greek words around the ring, which are the words translated world in the ESV New Testament (G)
  • Click a Greek word to see a list of verses in which that specific Greek word is translated world (H)

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  • Click the Greek lemma right above the list of verses (I) to generate a separate Bible Word Study report for that word (J)

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In essence, the Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections are displaying synonyms in the Old and New Testaments respectively for the word world. By studying all of these original words, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of the concept of world in the Bible.

If you enjoyed this tip, check out the Camp Logos 1 and 2 training videos for more original-language tips for English students.