See You at National Camp Logos!

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For nearly two decades, Logos users from around the globe have gathered annually at the Faithlife headquarters in Washington state to learn more and do more with their Bible software. This year’s National Camp Logos is on the books for June 24–26, and we want you to join. Both Camps 1 and 2 will be presented during the three days of live, hands-on training. Here’s what makes National Camp worth the journey to Bellingham.
 
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This Feature Makes Searching Your Logos Library a Breeze

One of the greatest benefits of Logos is the ability to find anything in your library.

When you open the Search panel and set the search type to Basic (A), you can select All Resources (B) or Everything (C).

Everything Search

 

I’m often asked, “What’s the difference between these two search types?”

Simply put, All Resources searches all of your books while Everything searches all of your books plus the Factbook, Atlas, Community Tags, and more!

Imagine you’re studying Jesus’ prayer in Matthew 26:36. When you read that he was in the Garden of Gethsemane you say to yourself, “I know I need info about Gethsemane, but what do I need—and where do I start?”

In times like these, try an Everything Search:

  • Open a Bible to Matthew 26:36 (D)
  • Right click on the word Gethsemane (E)
  • Select the English word Gethsemane on the right side of Context menu (F)
  • Select Search: everything from the left side of the context menu (G)

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When the Search opens, it is set to Basic (H) and Everything (J). As you peruse the search results, notice:

  • Preferred Bible lists occurrences of the word in your designated Bible (J)
  • Factbook links you to reports containing your word (K)
  • Topic shows links to articles about your word (L)
  • Media displays images related to your word (M)
  • Atlas Results provides links to relevant maps (N)
  • Library Results presents every occurrence of your word in the Library (the same as searching All Resources) (O)

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As you can see, the Everything Search provides a buffet of choices to further your study.

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For live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos, including events in Dallas, Texas and the St. Louis area.

If you can’t attend a live seminar or live outside the United States, you can pre-order Camp Logos Video Training, a downloadable Logos resource. Get it now!

Is Camp Logos Worth It?

For over 17 years, I’ve had the privilege of training users to better use Logos Bible Software through live seminars called Camp Logos. I’m often asked if it’s worth the investment of time and money to attend. As objectively as possible, I’d like to answer that question.

An investment that pays dividends

Yes, Camp Logos is worth the investment for several reasons. The training is:

  • Systematic: Rather than discovering unrelated features here or there on your own, you’ll see the big picture of the software as I guide you through Logos tools in a logical sequence.
  • Concentrated: Usually at the office or home we’re juggling meetings, emails, phone calls, and more. But at Camp, you can come away and focus on Logos. With fewer distractions, you can learn in a few days what would take weeks, months, or even years to discover on your own.
  • Interactive: The question-and-answer aspect of the live seminar adds to the learning experience. You’ll get your questions answered—whether during the main sessions or breaks.
  • Inspiring: Learning with fellow believers who are committed to Bible study, teaching, preaching, and Logos is contagious. You’ll leave Camp with your head full and your heart stirred.
  • Practical: As a Logos user and Bible teacher myself, I’ll not only show you how to use Logos features, but also how to implement them into your personal study and sermon or lesson preparation.

So yes, Camp Logos is a wise investment of time and resources that will pay immediate dividends.

Get ready for Camp

During April–May, Camp Logos is coming to:

  • Dallas, TX: May 5–7
  • St Louis, MO area: May 12–14
  • New Orleans, LA: May 18–20

Or, join us on June 24-26 for National Camp Logos at Logos headquarters in Bellingham, WA.

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If you can’t attend a live seminar or live outside the United States, you can purchase Camp Logos Video Training as a downloadable Logos resource. Get a great price on Pre-Pub right now!

Logos 6: How to Use and Hide Auto Bookmarks

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A fellow Logos user recently sent me this inquiry:

As I’m navigating through resources, I notice hash marks in the scroll bar area. What are they? Can I hide them?

Officially they’re called Auto Bookmarks and, yes, they may be hidden.

Think of the Auto Bookmarks as the “dog ears” we make on pages in print editions. We dog ear a page so we can easily return to it. Logos automatically dog ears locations for us in our resources. These dog ears or Auto Bookmarks are basically the recent history in a resource.

For Example:

  • Open your preferred Bible
  • Notice the hash marks in the scroll bar area (A)

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  • Rest the cursor on a hash mark to preview a previous location you’ve visited in the Bible (B)

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  • Click the hash mark to jump to the location (C)

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To hide Auto Bookmarks:

  • Chose Tools | Program Settings (D)
  • Set Show Auto and Favorite Bookmarks in the General section to No (E)

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Please note, selecting No does not erase the Auto Bookmarks, but merely hides them(F). In the future, if you select Yes, all of the previous Auto Bookmarks will return.

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For more Logos training check out our video resource Camp Logos 1. And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: Copy Highlighted Text to a Word Document

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A very common question I get is exemplified in this recent email inquiry from a Logos user:

Is there a way to copy and paste the biblical text into a Word document and maintain the highlights I’ve added?

The short answer is this: some highlights easily copy and paste, while others do not.

For example:

  • Open any Bible to any location
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Select some text in the Bible (A)
  • Expand the Solid Colors palette (B)
  • Select the Green Foreground style (C)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible turns green (D)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is maintained in the Word document (E)

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  • Select some additional text in the Bible (F)
  • Expand the Highlighter Pens palette (G)
  • Select the Green Highlighter style (H)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible is highlighted in green (I)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is NOT maintained in the Word document (J)

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What’s the difference in the above two scenarios?

Simply put, in the first example, we changed the character formatting on the text itself (turned it green). In the second, we basically added an image (green natural highlighter) to the text. Character formatting carries over in the copy–paste process; images do not.

So if you need Logos highlights in a Word document, use the Logos-provided styles that emphasize character formatting.

When you create your own styles, focus on the Font Styling (K) and Insert Text (L) sections that emphasize character formatting, including:

  • Font
  • Font size
  • Text color
  • Bold
  • Italics
  • Small caps
  • Large caps
  • Superscript
  • Subscript
  • Inserted text before or after the resource text

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All of the above characteristics are maintained as you copy and paste highlighted resource text from Logos to a Word document.

For more detailed instructions on creating your own highlighting styles, check out the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volume 2, which is part of the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2 bundle.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: See All the Places an Event Is Mentioned in Scripture

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Oftentimes a biblical event is not only mentioned in its original context, but also elsewhere in Scripture. For example, the Israelites being fed with manna is recorded in Exodus 16, but John 6:31 also alludes to it. The fall of Jericho occurs in Joshua 6, but it’s also referenced in Hebrews 11:30.

To thoroughly study an event, we can investigate every reference to it in the Bible. Logos makes that investigation easier with a Factbook report.

Try this as an example:

  • Choose Tools | Factbook
  • Type red sea in the reference box (A)
  • Select The Israelites cross the Red Sea from the drop-down list (B)

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  • Notice a Factbook report is generated for that event (C)
  • Navigate to the Passages section in the report (D)
  • Observe the Key Verses subsection, which displays Exodus 14:15–31 in which the event originally took place (E)
  • Notice the See Also subsection which lists other verses in which the event is referenced (F)

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  • Click Open 20 passages in preferred Bible to display only the above verses in your preferred Bible (G)

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With the above steps, you can easily see and study all passages related to a biblical event in one location!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: Quickly Mark Up Similar Words in a Passage

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A good friend recently emailed me explaining that while studying Philippians in the ESV, he noticed the words persecutor in Philippians 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 were all the same Greek lemma. He then asked if there was an easy way to automatically obtain a lemma count as well as highlight the same lemmas in a passage.

The answer? Yes.

The word list document type provides a lemma count, while a visual filter automatically highlights the text. In this post, however, I want to show you how to utilize a search to quickly highlight the same or similar lemmas in a passage.

  • Open the ESV to Philippians 3:1, where Paul cautions against legalism (A)
  • Right click on the word persecutor in Philippians 3:6 (B)
  • Select the lemma dioko from the context menu (C)
  • Select Search this resource (D)

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  • Make sure the verse range is set to an option, such as the New Testament, which includes Philippians (E)

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  • Notice that Logos highlights the active search results in a peachy color, which shows (as my friend pointed out) that persecutor in Philippian 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 are all highlighted because they’re all the same Greek lemma (F)

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You can, of course, execute additional right-click searches for other lemmas.

As you generate new searches, Logos opens new search panels and highlights those active results in the same peachy color. The result is that you may end up with 10 search panels open (G) and a lot of peachy words in the biblical text (H).

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To prevent new search panels from opening:

  • Choose the panel menu on the original search panel (I)
  • Select Send searches here (J)
  • Notice that Logos places a target on the search-panel menu (K)—now when you execute new right-click searches, the new results replace the existing results in the same search panel

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The lemma or dictionary form of a word is the same Hebrew or Greek word, regardless of its specific construction. In other words, the lemma may be a verb and searching for that lemma finds all occurrences of the verb whether its tense is present, aorist, subjunctive, etc.

Let’s say, however, that a word has both a noun and verb form. Searching for the lemma will not locate both. A lemma search is restricted to one part of speech.

To locate lemmas that are similar, but not the same, search for the root:

  • Right click the word perfect in Philippians 3:12 (L)
  • Select the root telos from the context menu (M)
  • Select Search this resource (N)

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  • Notice that the words perfect (verb in Philippians 3:12), mature (adjective in Philippians 3:15), and end (noun in Philippians 3:19) are all highlighted because they are similar lemmas sharing the same root (O)

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Try this root search with joy in Philippians 1:4, and notice how many peachy words appear!

This quick way of searching and temporarily highlighting words in a passage can be very useful in the observation phase of Bible study. Sometimes it reveals themes or repeated subjects such as joygospel, and service in Philippians.

However, please note a couple observations:

  • The same lemma in different contexts may have different meanings.
  • Just because lemmas may share the same root does not automatically imply those lemmas share similar meanings.

Use this post to help with observation, but always move into the interpretation phase of Bible study to answer the questions raised during observation.

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: Attach the Same Note to Different Places

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, the same biblical events are often mentioned in multiple places in the Bible. For example, Jesus’ prayer in Gethsemane is recorded in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

Let’s imagine we’re working our way through Mark when we come to the phrase “this cup” in Mark 14:36. We want to record our insights, so we create a note for Mark 14:36. During our research, however, we discover this same phrase also appears in Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42. Rather than creating two more separate notes, we can actually attach the same original note to the other two verses with a feature known as an attachment point.

Here’s how to get started with this power-user trick:

First, create the original note:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like “Notes on the Gospels” (A)
  • Make sure the view is set to Full (B)

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  • Open a Bible to Mark 14:36
  • Right click any word in Mark 14:36 (C)
  • Select Mark 14:36 from the context menu (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Notes on the Gospels” (E)

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  • Notice Logos creates, in the file, an individual note named “Mark 14:36” (F) with a Content box underneath it (G)

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  • Type your research in the Content box—for example, The demonstrative pronoun “this” implies nearness or being close at hand. (H)

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  • Notice Logos places a note indicator in the Bible next to Mark 14:36 (I)

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  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a pop-up preview of the note content (J)

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Next, add the attachment points:

  • Rest the cursor on the name of the note, “Mark 14:36” (K)

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  • Click the arrow link that appears to the far right of the note (L)
  • Select Edit attachment points (M)

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  • Type Matthew 26:39 in the reference box (N)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (O)

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  • Type Luke 22:42 in the reference box (P)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (Q)

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  • Click Done to close the attachment-points box (R)

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  • Navigate to Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42 in the Bible and notice a note indicator next to each verse (S)

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Now regardless of which account of Jesus’ prayer you’re reading, you’ll have your insights about “this cup” right there with you!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.

Logos 6: Find Verses in Which a Biblical Person Spoke

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Recently, I’ve been studying the life of Hagar in Genesis 16. In verses 7–8, the angel of the Lord found her and asked her two questions:

  • Where have you come from?
  • Where are you going?

These are two very profound questions regarding our direction in life, but we’ll save that discussion for another day. In this post, I simply want to focus on the fact that Logos identifies the angel of the Lord as the speaker of the questions by showing a megaphone icon. I was curious as to where else in Scripture the angel of the Lord spoke, so here’s what I did:

  • Open a Bible, like the ESV or NKJV, to Genesis 16:7 (A)
  • Find the megaphone icon in verse 8 identifying the angel of the Lord as the speaker (B)

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  • If the icons are not present:
    • Click the visual filters icon on the Bible’s toolbar (C)
    • Select Speaker labels (D)

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  • Right click any word in the questions from the angel of the Lord (E)
  • Select Angel of the Lord SPEAKER (F)
  • Select Search this resource (G)

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  • Notice that the search results display all the verses in which the angel of the Lord is identified as the speaker (H)

morris-proctor-find-verses-in-which-a-biblical-person-spoke-4 This simple search makes for rewarding research. Try it with:

  • Isaiah in Matthew 1:23
  • Sadducees in Matthew 22:24
  • Gabriel in Luke 1:28

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.

Logos 6: Opening Multiple Bibles on a Second Monitor

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I was recently emailed this question:

I study with a secondary monitor. I’d like to open on that screen a window containing several Bibles all linked together. How do I accomplish that?

This is an excellent question, with the answer utilizing several helpful Logos features. If you use multiple monitors with Logos, give the following steps a try.

First, open multiple Bibles in the same tile in the main Logos window:

  • Type ESV in the command box (A)

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  • Press the Enter key, which opens that Bible
  • Type NASB in the command box (B)

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  • Press the Enter key
  • Notice that the Bibles are probably in two separate tiles (C)

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  • Drag one Bible’s tab next to the other so they are both in the same tile (D)

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  • Open any additional Bibles you’d like
  • Makes sure all of your Bibles are in the same tile by dragging their tabs and placing them next to other Bible tabs (E)

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Next, place all Bibles in a floating window on the second monitor:

  • Right click any Bible tab (F)
  • Select Open all in a floating window (G)

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  • Notice all of the Bibles are now in a window separate from the main Logos window (H)

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  • Drag the floating window onto the second monitor

Now, place the Bibles in separate tiles in the floating window:

  • Click and hold a Bible tab in the floating window
  • Drag in and around the window noticing a blue highlighted area (I)

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  • Let go of the mouse, and the Bible will be placed in a tile where the blue highlight appeared (J)

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  • Repeat the above steps for the remaining Bible tabs so that all the Bibles are in separate tiles (K)

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Finally, link the Bible panels:

  • Chose the panel menu on a Bible (L)
  • Select Link set: A (M)

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  • Repeat the above steps for the other Bibles so they are all linked to set A (N)

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  • Type a reference like Matthew 6:33 in one of the reference boxes (O)

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  • Press the Enter key and notice that all of the Bibles move to that verse (P)

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As you can probably tell, using a second monitor enlarges your desktop for Bible study. Having your Bibles on another monitor allows you to use the main Logos window for guides, tools, searches, and other resources. You can also link the Bibles to a guide in the main window and the Bibles will follow that guide (or vice versa).

For added power, make sure to save this arrangement as a layout so you don’t have to recreate it in the future.

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.