A New Translation of a Bible Translation Preface

When I first read the KJV translators’ preface, I was surprised to see that they fully expected a cold reception to their work. They could have no idea that their Bible would one day be praised even by non-Christians for its literary quality and cultural importance.

The KJV translators felt they had to defend the very idea that another English Bible translation was necessary. They wrote a preface, “Translators to the Reader,” that is as superb as it is timely. But it also happens to be lengthy, and written in a historical form of English readers today will find difficult. So I have both condensed it and translated it into today’s English. But I’ve done my best to add nothing: everything you’re about to read, from arguments to (wonderfully pithy) illustrations, comes straight from the KJV translators.

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3 Simple Ways to Find That Quote or Passage You Can’t Quite Remember

I don’t just read the books in my Logos library; I use them.

I use them for preaching, for writing, for study, for personal emails, for online discussions with friends. I use my digital books in Logos so often that I get frustrated when the information or pithy quote I need is stuck between the cardboard covers of a paper book—or the intro and outro of an audio book.

For any fiction I read this is unimportant; I just don’t need to go back for specific quotes in such books. But without the many search and other tools in Logos, paper non-fiction books and reference works are harder to use for my various callings. I can’t find what I need.

With Logos, sometimes you don’t even need to run a search to find that quote or passage. Here are some of my favorite little ways you can get Logos to help you use—not just read—your books.

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2 Quick Hacks That Will Help You Learn from Early Christians

My Christian tradition has heroes like every other. This is good, at least when the heroes are good; it’s biblically sound to have heroes (Heb 12:1). The Bible itself offers its (nonetheless flawed) characters in part as moral examples, as heroes. Part of the purpose of the story of Joseph is to make us say, “I ought to be like that”; and Paul outright calls on us all to imitate him, repeatedly (John Frame calls this phenomenon “revelation through persons”).

In my tradition of Reformation Protestantism, all the heroes tend to have arrived on the scene precisely (and this year, I mean precisely) 500 years ago or less. People named “Saint So-and-so” don’t get much airtime.

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3 Free Logos Features That Make Seminary Easier

If you go to seminary, there are a certain tasks you will be asked to do. I don’t have to know which school you’re going to or what classes you’re taking. You’ll be doing these things. Three of them. Promise.

I’ve used pretty much all the major tools out there to do them, and I’m going to show you the best ones—and how to get them for free.

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Do We Have to Answer Every Tough Bible & Theology Question?

Truly understanding someone you deeply disagree with is exhausting. It’s a labor of love.

A friend with different politics recently brought up a subject about which I know “my side’s” position but not my own. I sensed he was attacking my tribe, but I couldn’t speak intelligently enough about the issue to have a worthwhile debate. I found my mental energy flagging as soon as this friend brought up the topic.

The same fatigue occurs sometimes when it comes to biblical and theological questions. I sometimes sit staring at my Logos screen wondering whether I have the energy to tackle a given question. I take comfort from two proverbs:

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How I Prepare, Preach, and Publish Sermons When Time Is Short

Good pastors are busy people. I was reminded of this last week when I filled in for my own pastor and had to fit sermon prep for a Sunday morning message into my own schedule. Amidst entertaining two out-of-town guests and two out-of-continent guests (we had a blast!) I had to find about seven hours of prep time. When I finally got to sit down Saturday afternoon while kids were napping, I found myself very naturally turning right to Logos.

I use Logos, SoundFaith, and other Faithlife products because I literally do not know how I would do my work without them in the limited time I have. I want to offer you some (I hope) time-saving, Bible-study-enhancing insight into my own sermon preparation, preaching, and publishing process.

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The Twist in the Sermon on the Mount That You Probably Missed

Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount amazed its original hearers; it subverted their expectations on multiple levels. It’s the meek who win the world. Believers are supposed to be happy when persecuted. And then this: Jesus, this new teacher with authority, came not to abolish but to fulfill the Old Testament.

His six famous “antitheses” (“You have heard . . . but I say to you . . . “) help explain what he means by “fulfilling” the law. But I think you, like me, may have missed something else unexpected in his comments—specifically those about anger.

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4 Simple Tips for Getting the Most out of Logos Bible Software

In my work as a Logos Pro, I sometimes hear users say, with a resigned, apologetic tone, “I probably use only 5 percent of the capabilities of Logos.” People with lots of responsibility, lots of training, lots of gifting, and lots of experience in ministry or scholarship (or both) all of the sudden grow bashful and embarrassed. They stare at the floor like it’s report card day. They crawl into nearby holes.

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What Would the Author of “Amazing Grace” Say about Social Media?

John Newton wrote a beautiful letter to a friend which is called in his collected works, “On Controversy”—because that friend was about to engage in public controversy over Christian doctrine; Newton wanted to give him some scriptural counsel. I have read it 20 times over nearly as many years, and thought of it countless more. In order to more fully get the principles into my own soul—because I, frankly, have not always lived up to them—I have taken the liberty of “transculturating” it for today’s Christian SMWs—Social Media Warriors. If Newton were to write the same letter today, this is my guess as to what he would write:

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Why Does Logos Say “Dine” Is a Metaphor in Luke 14:1?

The Figurative Language dataset in Logos marks the word “dine” in Luke 14:1 as a metaphor. Why?

Can you figure it out? I’ll give you ten Logos Pro points if you get the right answer.

One Sabbath, when he went to dine at the house of a ruler of the Pharisees, they were watching him carefully.

In a previous post, I showed Logos users how to automatically mark all figurative language in the New Testament with blue text. I’ve kept that visual filter on for my own Bible study, and that’s why I myself recently ran across this little puzzle.

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