The Most Used Words in the Bible

the most used words in the bible

I caved. Somebody sent me one of those time-wasting links you know you’re not supposed to click on if you want to get any work done. But I couldn’t help it. “Find out what your most used words on Facebook are,” the link said.

I was like Digory at the bell in Charn (for you Narnia fans). I had to know.

Plus, I had a feeling there would be a lesson about Bible Study in it somewhere. So I did it. For you, dear reader.

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How to Pronounce “Logos” and Other Important Evangelical Words

how to pronounce greek and hebrew words

Almost four years to the day before I came to serve the church as a Logos Pro at Faithlife, I wrote a post on my personal blog, “How to Pronounce ‘Logos’ in ‘Logos Bible Software.’” And since a big part of our mission is to turn you into a Logos Pro, the proper pronunciation of “Logos” is something we need to settle. Right here. Right now.

You see, there’s something of a schism among Logos aficionados, with two increasingly polarized parties, the LOW-goess (loʊɡoʊs) party and the LAH-gahss (lɑɡɑs) party. And believe it or not, this dispute has relevance for Bible students.

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A Bible Student’s Hidden Strength

Comparing Bible translations

I once had a grandmotherly friend, a secretary in my office, who had great interest in the Bible but no training in the biblical languages. Her strength as a Bible student came from one obvious and one hidden source.

The obvious source was her daily practice of Scripture reading, that beneficial spiritual discipline most Christians at least acknowledge—if only by experiencing a vague (or sharp!) sense of guilt that they’re not doing it. Well, she did it.

The hidden source of her strength as a Bible student was that she knew Spanish and frequently read her Spanish Bible, both in church services and in personal devotions. Simply put: She made comparing translations of Scripture a regular part of her Bible study.

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Middle-Eastern Man Forgiven 450 Gazillion Dollar Debt

the parable of the unforgiving servantWhat do you do if you get a sudden, unexpected opportunity to teach or preach God’s Word? I often turn to what is for me one of the most precious of Jesus’ parables, the Parable of the Unforgiving Servant—a passage one of my favorite writers on the parables (Klyne Snodgrass) groups with parables of “Grace and Responsibility.”

The “grace” is truly an amazing one: the master in the parable forgives a massive, unpayable debt—ten-thousand talents. The “responsibility” is a serious one: Jesus ends the parable with the promise that the dire consequences visited on the unforgiving servant will be visited on us all by God “if you do not forgive your brother from your heart” (Matt. 18:35).

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Do You Break These Rules for Greek and Hebrew Study?

Greek and Hebrew Bible study rules

I am a member of OLSHA, the Original Languages Safely Handled Association. Our mission—well, okay, my mission (nobody else has yet joined the association)—is to help people who love Scripture but don’t know Greek and Hebrew to use the original languages safely in their Bible study.

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What Agape Really Means

What does Agape really mean?

“Love” is the third most commonly looked up word at Merriam-Webster.com. Do you want to know what “love” means? You ought to. “Love God” and “love others” are the two most important commands of the Bible, on the authority of Christ himself.

Maybe you’ve already heard that agape (ἀγάπη) is the standard word for love in the Greek New Testament, and maybe you’ve heard that it points to a specific kind of love: a selfless, giving, non-emotional love—as opposed to the friendship love of philia (φιλία).

But I want to question these common assertions, give you a liberating tip for using Greek in your Bible study (whether you know Greek or not), and then apply that tip to one passage in which the meaning of agape figures prominently.

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How Should We Number the 10 Commandments?

Ten Commandments

The 10 Commandments were written in stone, and they still are on monuments around the world. And in this case, the medium is a message: commandments chiseled in stone are supposed to be permanent, unchanging.
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How to Find the Right Passage When Your Memory Fails

Search for Bible versesFrom age four to age 18 I read the KJV pretty much exclusively. All my Scripture memory in kids ministries was taken from the KJV, and I even begged my second-grade teacher at my Christian school to let the class speak in King James English for a day. She actually said we would do it, but she never followed through . . . (My belly hath been made bitter even unto this day.)
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How to Filter the Information Flood with Logos

information overload
There is way too much information out there for you to ever read, let alone process and assimilate. I dare you to click the “Random Article” link on Wikipedia and see how many clicks it takes you to get to a topic you really know something about. It took me 41 clicks before I reached State highways in Virginia (I grew up there).
And that’s just the English version of Wikipedia. German took me 52 clicks (I got lucky); Spanish, 23 (super lucky); French, 48; and please don’t malign me for giving up on Polish before I began. 
Media Ecologists such as Neil PostmanMarshall McLuhan, and evangelicalism’s own T. David Gordon have observed/complained that the amount of available information in the modern West is actually an obstacle to knowledge. How can you determine which information is worth having as the flood rushes by? How can you make sense of the relationships of things when those things are constantly swirling around you?

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How to Instantly Spot NT Allusions to the OT

LogosPro_blogOne of the most illuminating things that can happen in your Bible reading is when a few of your neurons fire as they pick up a subtle allusion a New Testament author makes to the writings of an Old Testament one. There’s great value in making a connection like that. It’s like what N.T. Wright once said about metaphors, “Metaphor consists in bringing two sets of ideas close together, close enough for a spark to jump… so that the spark, in jumping, illuminates for a moment the whole area around, changing perceptions as it does so.”
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