Seeing the Forest and the Trees in Your Bible Study

big picture of the bible I was born in a Bible study forest, but I didn’t know it. Trees every few feet, tree upon tree. I got to know them pretty well; I could hardly help it: sycamore, acacia, olive, cedar, fig, palm, terebinth. An occasional glade on a rise in that forest offered a glimpse of other rises and perhaps other forests, but it never occurred to me that a view from above might radically adjust my perspective.

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Three Tips for Stirring Up Your Love for the Bible

3 Tips for Stirring Up Your Love for the BIble

I was sitting at a lunch table with some acquaintances. Acquaintances, not friends. I admit we sat there for a while staring at our food and waiting for the awkwardness to subside.

Kind of like me and my Bible sometimes, I’m sad to say.

But then, at that lunch table, I happened to mention a little something called “soccer.” I’ve never seen people light up so quickly, or go from conversational zero to 60 in such a short time.
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Do We Have to Choose Between Print and Digital?

which is better print or ebooks

The Logos Pros are here to help the church. And one of the things the church is processing right now, along with much of the rest of the world, is the role digital tools will play in their reading.

D.G. writes:

I seek out many of the volumes mentioned on Logos newsletters for print editions since I literally hate reading on either my computer or iPad. I have personally purchased over 25 volumes in the last three months—none of which are digital. Am I alone in this or is it a trend to which computer focused businesses should reconsider?

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How to Quickly Transliterate Greek and Hebrew

how to transliterate greek and hebrew

“Transliteration” is not the same as “translation.” Tranliteration brings just letters across the divide between languages (if indeed the languages don’t already use the same alphabet). Спасибо becomes spasibo; 國語 becomes Guóyǔ. Scholars transliterate when they are writing about a foreign language for people who don’t speak or read it; they also do it sometimes, truth be known, because they themselves can scan text more quickly in their “mother characters,” the alphabet they’ve used since childhood.

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The Most Used Words in the Bible

the most used words in the bible

I caved. Somebody sent me one of those time-wasting links you know you’re not supposed to click on if you want to get any work done. But I couldn’t help it. “Find out what your most used words on Facebook are,” the link said.

I was like Digory at the bell in Charn (for you Narnia fans). I had to know.

Plus, I had a feeling there would be a lesson about Bible Study in it somewhere. So I did it. For you, dear reader.

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How to Pronounce “Logos” and Other Important Evangelical Words

how to pronounce greek and hebrew words

Almost four years to the day before I came to serve the church as a Logos Pro at Faithlife, I wrote a post on my personal blog, “How to Pronounce ‘Logos’ in ‘Logos Bible Software.’” And since a big part of our mission is to turn you into a Logos Pro, the proper pronunciation of “Logos” is something we need to settle. Right here. Right now.

You see, there’s something of a schism among Logos aficionados, with two increasingly polarized parties, the LOW-goess (loʊɡoʊs) party and the LAH-gahss (lɑɡɑs) party. And believe it or not, this dispute has relevance for Bible students.

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A Bible Student’s Hidden Strength

Comparing Bible translations

I once had a grandmotherly friend, a secretary in my office, who had great interest in the Bible but no training in the biblical languages. Her strength as a Bible student came from one obvious and one hidden source.

The obvious source was her daily practice of Scripture reading, that beneficial spiritual discipline most Christians at least acknowledge—if only by experiencing a vague (or sharp!) sense of guilt that they’re not doing it. Well, she did it.

The hidden source of her strength as a Bible student was that she knew Spanish and frequently read her Spanish Bible, both in church services and in personal devotions. Simply put: She made comparing translations of Scripture a regular part of her Bible study.

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Middle-Eastern Man Forgiven 450 Gazillion Dollar Debt

the parable of the unforgiving servantWhat do you do if you get a sudden, unexpected opportunity to teach or preach God’s Word? I often turn to what is for me one of the most precious of Jesus’ parables, the Parable of the Unforgiving Servant—a passage one of my favorite writers on the parables (Klyne Snodgrass) groups with parables of “Grace and Responsibility.”

The “grace” is truly an amazing one: the master in the parable forgives a massive, unpayable debt—ten-thousand talents. The “responsibility” is a serious one: Jesus ends the parable with the promise that the dire consequences visited on the unforgiving servant will be visited on us all by God “if you do not forgive your brother from your heart” (Matt. 18:35).

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Do You Break These Rules for Greek and Hebrew Study?

Greek and Hebrew Bible study rules

I am a member of OLSHA, the Original Languages Safely Handled Association. Our mission—well, okay, my mission (nobody else has yet joined the association)—is to help people who love Scripture but don’t know Greek and Hebrew to use the original languages safely in their Bible study.

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What Agape Really Means

What does Agape really mean?

“Love” is the third most commonly looked up word at Merriam-Webster.com. Do you want to know what “love” means? You ought to. “Love God” and “love others” are the two most important commands of the Bible, on the authority of Christ himself.

Maybe you’ve already heard that agape (ἀγάπη) is the standard word for love in the Greek New Testament, and maybe you’ve heard that it points to a specific kind of love: a selfless, giving, non-emotional love—as opposed to the friendship love of philia (φιλία).

But I want to question these common assertions, give you a liberating tip for using Greek in your Bible study (whether you know Greek or not), and then apply that tip to one passage in which the meaning of agape figures prominently.

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