New International Greek Testament Commentaries

All 12 volumes of the New International Greek Testament Commentaries are now available as individual downloads. Considering the massive amount of information in each commentary, the electronic versions will be a welcome addition to your digital library. You’ve heard the sales pitch before—electronic books save you time by bringing you straight to the information you need in seconds rather than hours. With print editions of thousand-page books you get lots of content and constant page turning. The electronic edition is a welcome alternative because you keep the great content while cutting your research time exponentially.

So what type of commentaries are the NIGTC? That question is best answered in the foreward of each volume. Senior editors Donald A. Hagner and I. Howard Marshall write:

“At a time when the study of Greek is being curtailed in many schools of theology, we hope that the NIGTC will demonstrate the continuing value of studying the Greek New Testament and will be an impetus in the revival of such study.


The volumes of the NIGTC are for students who want something less technical than a full-scale critical commentary. At the same time, the commentaries are intended to interact with modern scholarship and to make their own scholarly contribution to the study of the New Testament. The wealth of detailed study of the New Testament in articles and monographs continues without interruption, and the series is meant to harvest the results of this research in an easily accessible form. The commentaries include, therefore, extensive bibliographies and attempt to treat all important problems of history, exegesis, and interpretation that arise from the New Testament text.”

When these guys say their books have a “wealth of detailed study” they really mean it. Five of the commentaries are more than 800 pages in print form. (The volume on First Corinthians tops out at a whopping 1,479 pages!) Several of the books have received awards from organizations such as the Evangelical Publishers Association and Christianity Today.

In terms of value, the best way to go would be purchasing the 12-volume collection. To show our thanks to blog readers, Logos is now offering a discount on the NIGTC collection. Just enter coupon code NIGTC during checkout and your price will be reduced to $449.95. If you would prefer to mix and match the commentaries you want you’ll find links to each individual commentary below. For those who are studying any of the New Testament books covered in these volumes look no further than the NIGTC.

Listen to Dr. H. Wayne House’s Lecture

This past Monday (October 22) Dr. H. Wayne House gave his lecture “The Jesus Who Never Lived: False Christs and the Authentic Jesus.”

Click here to listen to Dr. House’s lecture.

Dr. House spoke for approximately one hour and then took questions for another 15 minutes. One of the highlights of his lecture was the incorporation of content from the Dead Sea Scrolls into New Testament interpretation. Dr. House had some amazing things to say regarding what the Jews would have expected from a Messiah, and how Jesus fulfilled those expectations in his life and teaching.

This lecture is highly recommended for those who want to combat the inaccuracies of some modern thoughts on the identity of Christ – including the Da Vinci Code, the Jesus Seminar, and the late Peter Jennings’ documentary on the historical Jesus.

Enjoy the lecture!

The Jesus Who Never Lived

Tonight Logos welcomes author and professor Dr. H. Wayne House to Bellingham for the Logos Lecture Series. Dr. House will present on “The Jesus Who Never Lived: False Christs and the Authentic Jesus.”

Ever since Jesus came to earth there has been a variety of ways in which He has been understood by those who have supposedly been His followers and by others who have had only a curiosity about Him. Some early Jews viewed Him as a prophet, while some early followers considered Him only a man (Ebionites), not a man at all (Gnostics) or a lesser god than the Father (Arians). Later Islam embraced Jesus as one of their prophets, and eastern mystics have considered Him as a guru. Since the enlightenment there have been four historical quests to discover the real Jesus, one who is only human in contrast to the voice of the orthodox church since its earliest days. Contemporary liberal scholars, news pundits, and Hollywood have had many opinions about Jesus, all different from how Jesus is presented in the earliest historical records of the Gospels and eyewitness accounts of those who walked with Him.

The purpose of this talk is to explain what has been said about Jesus over the centuries, particularly in the popular culture and press, why the picture of Jesus has emerged from various groups and people, and how we should best understand Jesus as He really was from the best evidence that we have about Him from those who knew Him.

Dr. H. Wayne House has authored or edited 30 books from publishers such as Zondervan, Thomas Nelson, and Kregel. He is the New Testament editor of the Nelson Study Bible and Nelson Illustrated Bible Commentary.

Please join us tonight at Bellingham’s Mount Baker Theatre at 7-8:30 PM. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Cast Your Vote for Christian Websites

Whether it’s on the best-seller lists, survey results or in the voting booth many Christians today feel underrepresented, or even misrepresented, by polls and statistics. Now there is a new way to let your voice be heard and “vote” for your favorite websites without having to answer any questions or fill out any surveys—with the Alexa Toolbar. In fact, when you have the Alexa Toolbar on your internet browser you don’t need to do anything aside from typical web surfing to show your support of the Christian websites you visit.

How does this work? It couldn’t possibly be easier. After downloading the Alexa toolbar, your visit to a website is essentially a vote that the site is worth your time. Data is collected and Alexa assigns a rank to every website on the internet. As a site gets more and more popular it gets closer to the coveted #1 ranking (currently held by Yahoo!). This is a free and completely hassle-free way to support the Christian websites you visit and raise their profile amongst secular sites.

Of course there are additional benefits to having the toolbar besides letting your voice (or mouse clicks) be heard. You can instantly click a button and see the “Whois” information about the people that own the site you are visiting, see a suggested list of similar sites, block pop-ups, email the page to a friend and so much more. You can also see the Alexa rank of every website you visit at the top of the page, which is a great way to find out how popular or reputable a website is. For example, if you are purchasing expensive jewelry over the web, it’s comforting to know you are making your order at a website that has an Alexa rank of 16,727 (BlueNile.com) rather than a site that looks impressive, yet is not even in the top 10 million sites on the net! There is no guarantee that an Alexa ranking ensures credibility or lack thereof, it is just one more way to make an informed decision when purchasing over the internet.

Click here to visit the Alexa Toolbar download page and follow the instructions in the page. The toolbar requires Windows and Internet Explorer 6.0 or greater. Firefox users can download the Sparky Toolbar, which is also made by Alexa and provides all the same features and benefits.

When downloading any tool on the internet it’s always important to know what you are getting. Alexa collects data to rank websites and provide related links on your toolbar. For a great description of how and why they do this refer to the Alexa Toolbar Privacy Policy. Regardless of whether or not you use of the Alexa Toolbar, you are sending information to each website you visit as soon as you arrive there. Alexa is simply utilizing that information to provide a service to you and all other toolbar users.

When considering all the benefits of downloading the Alexa Toolbar it’s easy to see why it is so popular. So download the Alexa Toolbar today and start “voting” for your favorite websites.

10 Million Dollar Library Expansion

Dale Pritchett, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Logos, is today’s guest blogger.

A quick search on Google will show there is a whole lot of fund-raising going on to finance brand-new climate-controlled luxury homes for old-fashioned paper books. Construction projects abound—ranging from 1.5 million dollars to more than 40 million dollars. They all share common characteristics; high construction costs, engineers, permits, contractors, bricks and mortar, real estate, parking lots, lengthy construction times and of course, literally tons of paper books.

Guess what else all physical library projects have in common? They all require a substantial commitment on the part of the patron to physically travel in order to visit the books. They are all designed to meet the needs of a thousand year old residential learning model in which a select group of geographically local individuals, for a prescribed period of time, cram as much information as possible into their heads before they scatter across the world and leave the library behind them forever.

With nerves of steel, I will resist the temptation to offer contrasts to the Libronix Digital Library System—you can do that for yourself. The world is changing rapidly and I am sure glad I don’t have to raise money to build library buildings. I feel the pain of those who are caught in the middle of the first major paradigm shift in more than a thousand years.

I will make one final comment: If I could divert funds from just one of those 10 million dollar brick and mortar library expansions to an investment in world missions, I could equip every full-time missionary in the world today with a Scholar’s Library, instead of putting up a building that a few hundred or few thousand people might someday decide to travel to and try to find the right book in. A little goes a long way.

Products for Preachers

As part of our attempt to make Logos Bible Software a better tool for sermon preparation we are continually releasing quality resources from today’s great preachers. Right now we’re getting ready to release two outstanding collections by John Piper: The John Piper Collection (24 Volumes) and John Piper’s Sermon Manuscript Library. Both collections contain resources that surely have the potential to become your “go to” books in Libronix.

Here’s a snapshot of what is included in each collection.

John Piper Collection (24 Volumes)

These resources cover a wide range of topics that will enrich the reader’s life. The treasures found in these volumes will help young and mature Christians grasp the truths of their faith and understand God’s mighty work in history and in our lives.

  • Nearly 6,000 pages of content
  • A God Entranced Vision of All Things – ten essays celebrating the life and work of Jonathan Edwards
  • Modern classics like Desiring God and Pierced by the Word
  • Piper’s studies of Christian forefathers Augustine, Luther, Calvin, John Bunyan, William Wilberforce and many more.

John Piper Sermon Manuscript Library

John Piper’s goal in preaching is to proclaim God’s glory which shines forth “in the gospel of the glory of Christ” (2 Cor 4:4). The glory of God is vital for our lives and for the life of the church. So come, join John Piper as he exults in God through the exposition of the biblical text, and taste and see that the Lord is good.

  • 1,125 manuscripts of John Piper’s sermons
  • Free updates of future John Piper sermon manuscripts

For anyone who prepares Bible studies or sermons, these resources will give a wealth of information far beyond their price.

Logos Lecture Series Video

In the famous words of Mick Jagger, “You can’t always get what you want.” At Logos we take every chance we can get to disprove the wrinkly rocker. That’s why we have heeded your requests to make available the most recent installment in the Logos Lecture Series.

Click here to watch Dr. Michael Heiser’s presentation, “The Concept of a Godhead in the Old Testament.”Podcast (24.4 MB)Audio Only (29.7 MB MP3)

For those of you in the Pacific Northwest, be sure to check the Lecture Series web page regularly for updates on future lectures.

The Concept of the Godhead in the Old Testament

Tonight’s edition of the Logos Lecture Series features Dr. Michael Hesier, academic editor at Logos. Dr. Heiser will discuss “The Concept of the Godhead in the Old Testament” at 7:00 PM at Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, WA.

Dr. Heiser provided this summary of his lecture:

As both extrabiblical historical sources and the New Testament book of Acts informs us, Christianity arose from Judaism. Jesus of Nazareth was a Jew. The apostles and first followers of Jesus were Jews. How is it then, that on one hand, God-fearing Jews, whose holy Scriptures affirmed that there was only one God, could worship both the God of the Bible and Jesus as God? How could any Jew reconcile worship of Jesus with monotheism? And how is it that Jewish Christians were simultaneously willing to suffer death at the hands of the Roman Empire rather than deny monotheism? Rather than consider first century Jews as religiously confused or closet polytheists, as many scholars today would contend, the answers to these questions are found in the Old Testament, which reveals the ancient faith of Israel contained the idea of a godhead long before its expression in the New Testament.

This same topic was the subject of Dr. Heiser’s Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He will approach the subject with an advanced understanding of the original languages of the Bible, which will help uncover some fascinating intricacies in the Old Testament.

Mountain Climbing: The Challenge of Learning Original Languages

In this blog post Dale Pritchett will extend the metaphor begun in his earlier blog entry and respond to some of the issues raised.

One summer my wife talked me into climbing a mountain. She explained in glowing terms all the benefits to body mind and spirit. She even extolled the value of the pain we could anticipate. The mountain had well marked trails and many had gone before. She didn’t tell me about the bodies.

Less than one hour into the hike we began to see a series of small monuments along the trail. These were dedicated to the memory of individuals who had died at that exact spot in a snow storm or a rock slide or suffered a heart attack, stroke, or whatever. I kept thinking, “I just want to see the view from the top. I don’t want to become a statistic.” The next time, I visited the mountain; I took a tram to the top. The view was the same. I observe that a lot more people want to enjoy the view than want to climb the mountain. I noticed also that enjoying the view killed a lot less people than climbing the mountain.

I understand that the person who climbs to the top has a different level of knowledge of the mountain, but it is also possible to climb the mountain the hard way and still miss the view. Each person has differing skills, abilities and gifts. The point is to capture as much perspective as you can and share the view with others, not the pain.

Original language study needs to be a reasonable amount of work for a skill you will use all your life.

I am not in any way attempting to minimize the value of traditional study in biblical languages. I am merely pointing out that the benefits accrue to only a few while the need exists for the many.

I am also not attempting to suggest that an ESV Reverse Interlinear in Logos Bible software is fully equivalent to the study of Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts. It is not. It is a major advancement over previous tools like Strong’s numbers.

I am pointing out the reality is precious few people master biblical languages in comparison to those who make the attempt or those who never make the attempt. I am expressing my opinion that the church is better served by people who make the effort to examine the original language text.

I am saying that exegetical fallacies are equally fallacious in any language. We need to be taught how to be responsible with whatever knowledge we hold. Software is not a substitute for instruction. For the English Bible student quality instruction in original language grammar and syntax was not possible with the limited resources in Strong’s numbers, the main link between English Bibles and original languages. Now with the expanded data available in a reverse interlinear, it is possible to expand the range of instruction significantly. It will take good instruction.

I am saying we need great instruction from great teachers which will develop the students to their potential regardless of whether it is based on a reverse interlinear or an biblical language text. I am saying that the reverse interlinear is a significant tool that can take an English Bible student further than ever possible before. And let’s face it; the reverse interlinear also serves a remedial function for those who have forgotten everything they ever learned in a traditional language course. The student is interacting with the text in a more intimate fashion sure to improve general exegesis. I am saying this is good!

My final analogy. Many people would love to be singers. Only a few become professionals. Do we forbid everybody else to sing? Do we cut out the tongues of those who don’t sing well to insure that we will not suffer from their impure tones? I am suggesting that it is very easy to fall into the trap of not developing the abilities we have, whatever they may be. We need to be reminded that we can teach students how to be responsible and stay within the boundaries of their range or ability.

Original Language Study: A Boutique Specialty

Today’s Guest Blogger is Dale Pritchett, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Logos. Also be sure to read Dale’s follow-up article Mountain Climbing: The Challenge of Learning Original Languages.


Greek and Hebrew professors are fast becoming an endangered species. Some contemporary people in “ministry” refer to Greek and Hebrew instructors as “traditionalists” when they are being kind, and “relics” when they are being critical. Language study has been labeled as elitist, impractical and unnecessary.

As VP of sales and marketing at Logos I enjoy a unique vantage point over churches, denominations and educational institutions. Because we deal with virtually every segment of Christendom, it is easy to spot common trends.

One of the easiest-to-spot trends over the past two decades has been the spiraling decline in original language requirements in seminaries and Bible schools. With two decades of momentum, this trend is now so well established it has migrated from the classroom to the pulpit. We now have pastors all over the world who lack the ability to consult or teach from original language texts common to prior generations. An unintended consequence of less rigorous study is the general lack of encouragement and emphasis on Bible study and Bible study methods courses for lay people. If a pastor does not demonstrate original language skills, there is little motivation for lay people to explore beyond the reach of their teacher.

As a result, it is now easier to find an original language Bible study methods course outside the church than inside the church.

Today we have prospective Bible college and seminary students who have grown up in churches totally devoid of original language informed teaching. These prospective students now evaluate the relevance of a seminary program on the basis of their own exposure to preaching and Bible teaching. It should come as no surprise that the most attractive seminary programs are marketed with compelling phrases like, “does not require study of the biblical languages for graduation.”

It is easy to fault the spirit of anti-intellectualism in the church today. It is easy to say there is little immediate payoff for all the hard work, and perhaps easiest of all to say, “Original language study is a lot of work for something I will never use.” Unfortunately, the preceding statement may be proven quite true in the reality of today’s church.

Original language study needs to be a reasonable amount of work for a skill you will use all your life. I believe this can be accomplished with automated tools.

I know seminaries would like to see more students take an interest in original languages but they are faced with a trend they don’t expect to see reversed any time soon. While they lament the state of Bible literacy, their first priority is student enrolment. Schools are competing for tuition dollars and they often find they must deliver the programs demanded by the market as opposed to programs designed by the institution. I believe this can be changed. This is where the cycle can be broken.

If a seminary really wants its students to work with original languages it needs to adopt methods which can make this happen. Original language study needs to become a pleasant and profitable experience for all students, not just the linguistically gifted or the doggedly determined. Let me make a couple of analogies. If you want to get a lot of people to a mountain top, you can hang a climbing rope, mark a trail, install a tram, build a road or install an elevator. Each successive technology will empower more people to get to the top. If we want everybody to get across the river we can offer swimming lessons, put a rope and pulley across the river, build a raft, operate a ferry or build a bridge. Each successive technology will empower more people to get to cross the river. If we want every student to learn to use original languages we need to build a bridge that gets everybody to the destination. This is the purpose of the Reverse Interlinear texts in Logos Bible Software.

I will say it again. Original language study needs to become a pleasant and profitable experience for all students. There needs to be a formal course of instruction to achieve this end. An English language Bible student can go a long way in Greek and Hebrew with the aid of our reverse interlinears but the benefits are best realized with first class, formal instruction in grammar and hermeneutics. If the very best Greek, Hebrew and Hermeneutics professors adopted the best computer based reverse interlinear technology, the following benefits would be realized.

  1. All students would be able to study original language concepts.
  2. Original language exegesis would take place earlier in the educational process.
  3. There would be a larger potential pool of students motivated to go on in original language studies.
  4. Language skill retention would improve dramatically because. . .
  5. Students would have a permanent and familiar tool for ongoing ministry.

The gifted students will still be gifted students. There will only be more of them because the original language student pool will be larger. The gifted students will move on to traditional courses and become future faculty. The average students will be functional but always dependent on the tools. But this is the key point! All students will use original languages the rest of their lives. The tide of biblical literacy will rise and the entire church will benefit.

And finally, Greek and Hebrew faculty would have secure, full, long term employment. They are the people who can generate the most value from the new tools. Powerful tools are best used by powerful teachers.