More Ways to Make Logos Bible Software Work for You

Last week we looked at creating custom layouts to streamline the way you use Logos. In response to that post, we received some excellent feedback from our users—and a request for even more ways to personalize the Logos platform.

In this week’s video, we’ll continue to look at customizing Logos to fit your study process: we’ll create custom guides to get you just the information you need. Follow along as one of the Logos Pros helps you build several guide reports, tracking down information from commentaries, journal article, primary source material, and more. [Read more…]

Customize Your Bible Study

Most students seem to have their own method of studying the Bible. Some people love to mark up their Bibles with pens and highlighters; others fill up every square inch of a desk with lexicons, commentaries, original language texts, and theological works. One seminary student I know preferred to study by lining the walls of his small apartment with notes and article clippings; he would then pace the room, adding his own comments in the white spaces. [Read more…]

Logos Pro Tech Tip: Studying the Sermon on the Mount with the Help of the Dead Sea Scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls are one of the most significant biblical archaeological discoveries of all time. They shed new light on the teachings and culture surrounding the New Testament and the life of Jesus. People around the world have been able to see the scrolls in traveling exhibitions, and the Shrine of the Book in Jerusalem displays the premier treasure of the collection, the Great Isaiah Scroll.

With Logos, you can have full access to both biblical and sectarian manuscripts; you can also accurately search and explore these ancient texts side-by-side with English translations.

In this week’s video, we will use the power of Logos to investigate the concept of “hatred” referenced in Matthew 5:43 and discover key references to this topic in the sectarian manuscripts of the Dead Sea Scrolls. [Read more…]

Not Your Average Wordbook

The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a new breed of language tool, one built for any student of the Bible. Craig Bartholomew explains:

In a day in which seminaries and universities are loosening their hold on the biblical languages Lexham Press is boldly leading the way towards a constructive and thoroughly contemporary retrieval. The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a marvelous resource for scholars, pastors, seminarians, and for those whose knowledge of the biblical languages is limited. Scripture is given to us in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, and we need this sort of help in excavating its riches. This Wordbook is based on the best current linguistic insights and will be a resource that I keep close at hand. The Wordbook is an ambitious and major achievement and should and will be used widely.

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Logos Pro Tech Tip: Reforming the Way You Study the Works of Jonathan Edwards

Few American theologians have shaped Christian thinking, preaching, and even revival practices as much as Jonathan Edwards. And Edwards left many volumes of memoirs, letters, sermons, and notes. His “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” is probably the most famous English sermon ever written, and is studied to this day by students of American literature. However, the popularity of this sermon has led some to dismiss Edwards as merely a “hellfire and brimstone” preacher.

In this week’s video, we’ll take a look at the Works of Jonathan Edwards, Yale Edition, and discover how easy it is to search for key terms and theological concepts inside the writings of this towering Christian figure.
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What’s Really Eating Jonah?

Was Jonah swallowed by a fish or a whale? Various opinions can be found in classic works, such as this third-century artistic rendition of the scene, Jerome’s Latin Vulgate, Tyndale’s 1534 translation, and in most theological works to date.

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Build Your Own Systematic Theology

Systematic Theologies are excellent resources for studying any biblical doctrine. They lay out complex theological topics in an intelligible way and contain a wealth of related Scripture references. It can be difficult, however, to know how to study further. Where do you start?

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Repeat and Reuse: Using the Logos Word List Tool to Find Insight

Last week we looked at how the biblical authors used the same terms repeatedly in different passages to indicate emphasis. This week we will reuse the Word List tool to find repeated terms in a single passage—we’ll discover a second use of the literary device simply called repetition.

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Logos Pro Summer Training: What Can We Learn about Mary from an Old Testament Law?

Each week this summer the Logos Pros will teach you how to master the tools and resources of Logos Bible Software. You’ll get some pointers and some study questions. 

The Passover is an Israelite celebration with tremendous significance across both testaments. Today the Passover echoes through Christian churches every time the Lord’s Supper is celebrated—because the original Lord’s Supper was itself a Passover meal (see Luke 22:7–22).

It was no accident that Christ established his New Covenant—“this is the new covenant in my blood”—during the celebration of a Jewish feast. There are rich connections between Yahweh’s deliverance of his enslaved people at the exodus from Egypt and Yahweh’s deliverance of his people from much more persistent chains, chains of sin, in the New Covenant. The slaughtering of a lamb is, obviously, a resonant image from the beginning to the end of Scripture.
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Logos Pro Summer Training: One-Hit Wonders in the Bible

Each week this summer the Logos Pros will teach you how to master the tools and resources of Logos Bible Software. You’ll get some pointers and some study questions. 

Shakespeare used around 17,000 different words to write his plays; some of them he used only once, such as imbecility. Words that appear just one time in a given text are called hapax legomena. The New Testament contains quite a number of these. (A Logos user made a full list here.)

Biblical hapax legomena present a unique challenge to translators, because we discover what words mean by observing how they’re used. When these rare words occur, translators are forced to search usage outside of the Bible to discover their meaning.

[Read more…]