Bible Study Software Put to the Test: Logos 6 in Review

logos-6-reviewsOver the last month, many ministry leaders, authors, and speakers have given Logos 6 a spin and shared their thoughts. They’re writing blog posts, planning sermons, creating lessons, and studying the Word with the most advanced Bible study tool on the planet.

Here’s what they’re saying about Logos 6:

Equipping church leaders

Communicating in-depth biblical insight to congregations is no small task. Tools like Cultural Concepts and Interactive Media are helping pastors put difficult ideas in simple, presentable terms. With Media Search, you get quick access to related images without interrupting study and planning!

Logos 6 does an excellent job of mixing classical study resources with interactive, digital resources. Logos 6 is a must have application for ministers, teachers, students, and anyone who loves to immerse themselves in biblical studies.

—Eric Dye (read the full review at ChurchMag)

As I go on using Logos, I am increasingly impressed by some of the technical tools available to me, tools that I am still discovering. These add, if not vast swathes of usefulness to my study processes, at least some real and helpful insights and nuances.

—Jeremy Walker (read the full review at reformation21)

Authoring new books

For the first time ever, Logos 6 gives you access to a semantic outline that covers the entire New Testament: the Propositional Flow Outline. Hours of exegetical research have already been done for you, taking the process out of your research and study. Your writing process is made even more simple with automatic citations, ensuring that you never forget where your information came from while securing your credibility as a writer.

Logos 6 will ever be before me during my work on the Philippians volume in the Baylor Handbook on the Greek NT.

—Dr. William Varner (read the full review at

. . . already my Bible study is reaching a new level of depth, and really, bringing me back to a passion for pursuing Jesus in his Word . . .

—Zach Hoag (read the full review at The Nuance)

Better Bible study

Logos 6 is your central place for all things related to Bible study. Using the new Everything Search, you can quickly assemble all of your resources on a given topic in one place, with one search. Factbook is the new encyclopedia for Bible information—use it to build a general understanding of a topic or to follow links to all your related resources for specific insights.

. . . Logos 6, is an amazing compendium of data and tools that comprise an exhaustive library of Bible study resources just a mouse-click away.

—Steve Howells (read the full review at Search The Bible)

After finishing Micah, I wanted to dig a little deeper on some of the themes from the book. I was able to search ‘justice,’ ‘mercy,’ and even ‘Micah’ to learn more. Logos pulled a plethora of resources from commentaries, Bible dictionaries, books on the topics, ancient texts, and even illustrated encyclopedias. I could see maps of where Micah lived and preached, a timeline that explained his place in relation to the other minor prophets, and an easy-to-understand overview of Micah.

—Amy Jackson (read the full review at Christianity Today)

At the forefront of academic research

Studying the ancient languages has never been easier. Logos 6’s new Ancient Literature section takes parallel passages and intertextual connections to a new level, exposing shared language and thought across relevant literature. And your scholarly journals are now more accessible with the new Journals Section—instantly connect your search queries to the latest theological discoveries and to insights from today’s leading scholars.

For personal and professional study—preparation of Sunday school lessons, for example, or of classroom lectures—Logos allows me to focus on the content rather than the process of getting it.

—Dan Olinger (read the full review at

With the advent of Logos 6 comes some great new features for both pastors and scholars.

—Danny Zacharias (read the full review at

Bible study on the go

Logos’ mobility makes it a great tool for busy travelers. With new interactive infographics and Interlinear Explorers, not only can you study on the go, but you can prepare your message and create unique, engaging visuals for your next presentation. Capture complex concepts visually with the new Psalms Explorer and updated Timeline.

I’ve always loved reading the Bible but here’s the thing. I want to be able to do it on my computer. I want to be able to study the Bible in-depth wherever I am without lugging a pile of books along with me.

—Darlene Schacht (read the full review at Time-Warp Wife)

The ‘media’ search allows me to search all the media in my personal library and online. This is a wonderful tool for someone who is trying to put together a multimedia presentation on a particular topic.

—Stephen Altrogge (read the full review at The Blazing Center)

Empowering the Christian community

Community is an ever-growing strength of Bible study with Logos. Faithlife Groups make it easier than ever to connect with others studying the same topics as you. Create your own groups for private Bible study, or explore what others are reading and join the conversation! The new Visual Copy tool also helps you instantly share your findings across the web.

Not only has Logos provided this help in studying God’s Word, but has blown my expectations even more with how much they provide for you to learn.

—Mike Mobly (read the full review at Before the Cross)

Where Logos 6 really shines is in its new features. The team has done a fantastic job of doing some really cool new things to enhance your study experience.

—Aaron Armstrong (read the full review at Blogging Theologically)

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A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz (Part 2)

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges. This is the second part of a two-part interview—if you missed part one, catch up here.

Dr. Jantz, we currently have eight of your books in the Logos format, including Controlling Your Anger Before It Controls You. What can you tell us about anger? Is anger healthy or unhealthy to feel and express?

While planning this book, I realized I could exchange the word “anger” with the word “hurt.” Many times, we feel hurt and don’t know what to do with it, so it turns into anger. This book explains how to address our hurt before it becomes anger. Otherwise, the next stage is resentment, then bitterness. It creates an embittered spirit within us without our even realizing what’s occurring. [This embittered spirit] then leads to other issues, such as depression and addiction.

According to your book Healthy Habits, Happy Kids, how has culture affected interactions within families?

Culture has changed the act of sitting down to have a meal together, and that has nutritional consequences. Now we’re accustomed to this instant, fast-food culture, and even when families do sit down at the dinner table, it’s condensed because everyone is used to going so fast. Conversation is short because phones are out and texting goes on at the dinner table—that’s a problem.

You have two books that go together, Every Woman’s Guide to Managing Your Anger and Battles Men Face: Strategies to Win the War Within. What are the differences between men and women when it comes to dealing with internal struggles?

Women have a stronger tendency to internalize hurt and anger. Once internalized, that hurt and anger are transformed into something else. It may be depression; it may be an eating disorder. Men often deal with their anger more outwardly, perhaps through sports or some physical way of acting out.

In your book How to De-stress Your Life, what sources and solutions do you identify?

People become stressed, but they keep going and going. Then they become burned out, stop sleeping well, stop eating nutritiously, and yet still keep going. The final stage of stress hits, which is whole emotional exhaustion. This is the man in my office saying, “Dr. Jantz, it takes energy just to breathe.” The solution to this is to start administering self-care.

What does that self-care look like?

It’s dealing with the three deadly emotions: anger, fear, and guilt. A person who’s emotionally healthy knows not only how to manage those three, but also how to bring about a healthy response. They don’t injure themselves or others when they’re angry; they go to their faith when fear arises.

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All these titles are available in the Gregory Jantz Collection, currently on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Get yours before prices go up!

A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges.

You founded A Place of Hope 30 years ago, you’ve written 28 books, you’ve impacted thousands of lives—you’re obviously doing something right. What’s the “whole person care” approach you implement at A Place for Hope?

The whole care approach is a model I created that puts together a team specifically based on what a patient’s needs are. We have medical, psychiatric, fitness, and natural health care staff, as well as massage therapists, counselors, pastors, and chemical-dependency doctors. A whole team fit for each individual.

How does your organization differentiate itself from other treatment centers for emotional and health issues?

We’re all Christians, so we’re [a] faith-based [organization]. The whole person care is the spiritual foundation. Our theme verse is Jeremiah 29:11—it’s on the wall by the entrance. That verse is a reminder and promise to us all that we have a future, and it’s good.

What are some tips for people feeling angry or distressed, and wanting to get rid of those feelings in a healthy way?

Those feelings have to be dealt with and recognized as a problem. Many times, we develop a [concept] of unforgiveness in our lives and don’t deal with reality or handle anger well. [Thus], the step to recovery is self-forgiveness. The second step takes on the question of “how am I going to forgive those who have hurt me?” The goal is to move from being angry to [understanding] what to do with that anger.

What inspired A Place for Hope—did you wake up one day and decide “I’m going to change thousands of lives”?

The idea of whole person care came to me in college. It means living whole lives as God and Christ designed for us. The vision for A Place for Hope grew from the belief that you have to minister to the whole person in all aspects of life.

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Be sure to pre-order the Gregory Jantz Collection while it’s still on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Claim your copy before the price goes up!