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4 Outstanding Reformed Systematic Theologies

Of the similarities between natural science and systematic theology, Charles Hodge writes: “If the object of the one be to arrange and systematize the facts of the external world, and to ascertain the laws by which they are determined; the object of the other is to systematize the facts of the Bible, and ascertain the principles or general truths which those facts involve.” Similarly, Michael Horton, in his The Christian Faith: A Systematic Theology for Pilgrims on the Way, writes that systematic theology “is like the box top of a jigsaw puzzle, and every believer is a theologian in the sense of putting the pieces together. If we fail to recognize there is a box top (i.e., a unified whole) to Scripture, we will have only a pile of pieces.”

John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion

For nearly 500 years, Calvin’s Institutes has been a bastion of Reformed systematic theology. Calvin wrote the first edition in Latin in the mid–sixteenth century, with a French edition published shortly thereafter; several English translations have appeared through the nineteenth century from both the Latin and the French editions. The Institutes is comprehensive and surprisingly pastoral, originally meant as an introduction to Christian faith and doctrine. Calvin’s magnum opus is still used in seminaries around the world today, and several translations are available in Logos, including the definitive English translation by John McNeill, available for pre-order.

Francis Turretin’s Institutes of Elenctic Theology

Francis Turretin pastored a church in Geneva, and was known as a strong defender of orthodox Calvinism. His seminal work is often called one of the most undervalued systematic theologies in Reformed history. Institutes of Elenctic Theology has been praised by the likes of Richard Gaffin, John Frame, James Boice, Wayne Grudem, and Norman Geisler. These volumes were required reading at old Princeton, and were dutifully studied by such giants in systematics as Charles Hodge, B. B. Warfield, and Louis Berkhof. R. Scott Clark writes, “One of the greatest of the seventeenth-century Reformed dogmatic works, it has retained its influence through its use at old Princeton. These three volumes put in your hands an excellent representative of high Reformed orthodoxy and polemical theology.” See it on Pre-Pub.

Benedict Pictet’s Christian Theology

Pictet, like Turretin and Calvin before him, also hailed from Geneva. His Christian Theology is a well-organized and convincing presentation of theology. Anyone familiar with, for instance, Warfield’s views on plenary inspiration will recognize the same strain of thought in Pictet’s writings, and will find excellent hermeneutics and exegesis employed in Pictet’s use of Scripture, out of which all his theology flows. This excellent volume is now available for pre-order.

Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics

A couple hundred years later, Geerhardus Vos wrote this remarkable systematic theology. Vos wrote in Dutch, but the English translation (with Dr. Richard Gaffin leading the translation team) is available for pre-order. Like Turretin’s Institutes, Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is written in a succinct Q&A format, which makes it an immensely helpful reference tool and research aid. Here’s an excerpt, demonstrating Vos’ brevity and clarity:

“What is the relation between God’s decree, His free knowledge, and the free actions of men?
God’s decree grounds the certainty of His free knowledge and likewise the occurring of free actions. Not foreknowledge as such but the decree on which it rests makes free actions certain.”

Want More Systematics?

Check out the volumes mentioned above, plus more, on Community Pricing and Pre-Pub. Help us get these important systematic theologies into Logos!

Leave us a comment and tell us about your favorite systematic theology!

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Community Pricing lets you help choose the price on some terrific books. It’s one of the best ways to get a great deal: we’ve seen savings of over 90% on some books and collections! Check out this quick video to see how simple it is to save with Community Pricing:


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56% Off the Time-Tested Encyclopedia You’ll Love: Bid Now!

Adding a reliable encyclopedia to your Logos library can do a lot for your Bible study. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition (ISBE) is one such time-tested resource, with contributions from leading twentieth-century theologians such as B. B. Warfield, Archibald Alexander, A. T. Robertson, and H. C. G. Moule. This comprehensive encyclopedia is on Community Pricing, where you can bid what you’d be willing to pay.

When you integrate the ISBE into your library, you’ll be able to look up thousands of words or phrases in the Bible or Apocrypha by right-clicking them and selecting the ISBE from the context menu.

Let’s say you’re reading through the Gospel of Luke and come across Luke 1:7: “But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were advanced in years.” What is the significance of Elizabeth being barren? It brings to mind Abraham and Sarah, but maybe there’s more to it. If you were to look up “barren” in the ISBE 1915 edition, you would find a concise article written by Thomas Rees that gives you a cultural and biblical understanding of barrenness.

“. . . barrenness was a woman’s and a family’s greatest misfortune. The highest sanctions of religion and patriotism blessed the fruitful woman, because children were necessary for the perpetuation of the tribe and its religion. It is significant that the mothers of the Heb[rew] race . . . were by nature sterile, and therefore God’s special intervention shows His particular favor to Israel.”

Further, we read that “metaphorically, Israel, in her days of adversity, when her children were exiled, was barren, but in her restoration she shall rejoice in many children.” This gives us a solid understanding of what being barren would have meant to Jews in that time, which in turn helps us to understand the miraculous birth of John the Baptist.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia covers thousands of topics related to Scripture, history, geography, cultural milieu, and more. Bid now to save 56%!

Note: Do you already own the Ages edition of The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition that was built for Libronix? If you do, you’ll receive this updated collection for free; the files will automatically download when it’s complete. The previous edition was created many years ago, using the best digital files available at the time. We’re rebuilding the 1915 ISBE from the ground up—this collection will contain new, updated files. If you don’t own the 1915 ISBE, enhance your library with one of the most useful and trusted reference collections by placing your bid today!

Save a Bundle on The Jewish Encyclopedia

It’s easy to forget that the Bible is a profoundly Jewish book. But a quick glance through the Old Testament reveals elements of Jewish history, poetry, and ancient narrative, all of which can seem incredibly foreign.

The Jewish Encyclopedia, published by Funk & Wagnalls around 1906, has been looked to for over a century as a guide through Jewish history, culture, rituals, and rabbinical teaching. Today it’s as much a research and study aid as it was in the early twentieth century. With this massive encyclopedia in Logos, it’s more accessible and useful than ever.

And now that it’s on Community Pricing, you can bid whatever you’d be willing to pay. With the current projected price, this is your chance to save 86%!

With thousands of articles, images, and illustrations, The Jewish Encyclopedia integrates beautifully into Logos, putting comprehensive accounts of Jewish history, literature, and intellectual life right at your fingertips. Don’t miss this opportunity to save 86% on The Jewish Encyclopediaplace your bid today.

Enhance Your Sermon Prep with the Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary

HomileticPreparing a sermon ought to be a weighty matter. After all, God has entrusted us with “the gospel of glory” (1 Ti. 1:11) that we might grow and feed the people of God. One of our passions at Logos is giving you the tools and resources you need to faithfully expound the Word of God, and the Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary (38 vols.) on Community Pricing will be a great help.

The Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary was written to aid you in sermon preparation. Its 30 authors walk you through each passage in 55 books of the Bible, giving you expository insight and wisdom from a variety of thinkers, theologians, and pastors.

All 38 volumes are currently on Community Pricing, where you can bid what you’d be willing to pay. The current successful bid of $40 is only a few dollars more than what this entire collection sold for when this was originally published in 1892!

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Don’t miss this opportunity to save 93% on a terrific commentary set, perfect for preaching, Bible study, and devotions alike—place your bid today!

Free Greek and Latin Manuscripts on Pre-Pub

We’re happy to announce that you can pre-order Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis for free!

Theodore Beza, John Calvin’s successor as leader of the Genevan church, first presented this uncial codex to the library at the University of Cambridge (Cantabrigia in Latin, from which the latter part of the codex’s name originated) in 1581. Believed to have been penned in the late or early fourth and fifth century, Codex Bezae contains the four Gospels, Acts, and the last several verses of 3 John. It is a unique manuscript with many peculiarities, from the license taken in adding, rephrasing, and omitting portions of text to the fact that it contains both Greek and Latin text, arranged in “sense-lines” and facing each other on opposite pages.

Important and Unique

Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis, Matthew 11:10-21

This important text has played a fascinating role in textual criticism and canonical studies. It is the oldest-known manuscript containing the story of the adulterous woman
found in John 7–8, as well as a longer ending of the Gospel of Mark. There are also several apparent additions, including a story found nowhere else of Jesus addressing a man found working on the Sabbath. For centuries, scholars have been intrigued by this manuscript’s implications and the information it gives about the written culture of fourth- and fifth-century Christianity.

Powerful in Logos

With Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis in Logos, you have a powerful combination—not only because of the numerous grammars, journal articles, apparatuses, and commentaries that reference this resource, but also because of Logos’ powerful search capabilities, and the original-language tools and resources at your fingertips.

Whether you’re interested in the history of translation and early Christianity or you’re a veteran of textual criticism, this free resource will make a valuable addition to your Logos library. Don’t miss this chance to get a digital edition of this historical manuscript for free—pre-order Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis today at no cost!

Last Chance to Save 33% on Timothy Keller’s Sermons!

Logos is proud to team up with Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church to offer the Timothy Keller Sermon Archive, a digital archive of more than 22 years’ worth of Keller’s expositional sermons. This exciting project will put over 1,200 sermons in your Logos library, allowing you to search the archive for different topics or Scripture passages and helping you in your personal studies, sermon preparation, and devotional reading.



Shipping soon!

This is your last chance to order the Timothy Keller Sermon Archive for the low Pre-Pub price—$100 off the regular price. Remember, the sermons will be released in five increments as we finish transcribing them—so you’ll get several years’ worth of sermons as soon as the archive ships, and the rest of the content will automatically update to your library as we finish it.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more than two decades of Timothy Keller’s sermons for less than 20 cents each! Time is running out to pre-order, so get yours now.

Let’s Get John Owen’s Latin Works Translated!

John Owen, one of the seventeenth century’s most prominent Puritan thinkers, left a body of work that’s been guiding Christians toward God for nearly 400 years. Roger Nicole called him “the greatest theologian who has ever written in the English language.” But not all of Owen’s work was in English, and some of it has remained untranslated since the 1600s.

So we’re undertaking the exciting project of translating The Latin Works of John Owen, in English (3 vols.)! The collection includes John Owen’s massive historical theology, Theologoumena Pantodapa—current translations are very difficult to find—as well as his never-before-translated poetry and lectures, which appear in Latin in the 24-volume Works of John Owen, already available in Logos. The translator is still to be announced, but stay tuned for updates in the near future.

By pre-ordering these three volumes, you’re doing more than just reserving your copy at the best price; you’re helping kick-start a monumental translation project, and helping produce works that previously were available only to scholars. Pre-order The Latin Works of John Owen, in English (3 vols.)

An Interview with Dr. Richard Gaffin on the Ridderbos Legacy

Herman Ridderbos (1909–2007) is acclaimed for bringing clarity to eschatology and redemptive history, among other important topics. His legacy as a theologian is far-reaching. We are very pleased to offer the Herman Ridderbos Collection (9 vols.) on Pre-Pub.

We recently talked to Dr. Richard Gaffin, professor emeritus of biblical and systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, and editor of the Logos edition of Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics translation team, about Ridderbos’ influence and theological legacy.

Logos: Herman Ridderbos has influenced a range of theologians, from Joel Beeke to N. T. Wright. What have the writings of Ridderbos done for you personally?

Dr. Gaffin: He is among those from whom I’ve learned who have most deepened my understanding of Scripture, and so my knowledge of God and my submission to the saving lordship of Christ.

Logos: What does Ridderbos contribute to the discussion of the New Testament canon, and why is it significant?

Dr. Gaffin: He demonstrates the apostolic matrix of the New Testament documents, and so provides an exegetically based, redemptive-historical rationale for their origin and for the closing of the New Testament canon.

Logos: You and Ridderbos have both written on the topic of “redemptive history”—can you explain what it means, and why the concept is important?

Dr. Gaffin: Redemptive history begins following the original creation and at the entrance of sin. Subsequently, the concept largely incorporates the history of Israel, God’s old covenant people, until in the person and work of Jesus Christ it reaches its new covenant eschatological consummation with the realized–still future (“elliptical”) pattern.

All of the biblical documents, regardless of genre, have their origin and their content as a function of redemptive history. Sound understanding of the Bible turns on understanding its redemptive-historical origin and redemptive historically qualified subject matter.

Logos: Do you think the evangelical church today has a thorough understanding of the Kingdom of God? How would Ridderbos’ writings help inform that understanding?

Dr. Gaffin: In my perception, the majority of evangelical churches still view the Kingdom of God—along with eschatology in general—as entirely future. Their need is to appreciate and appropriate “elliptical” eschatology (the by now proverbial “already-not yet”), particularly as Ridderbos has demonstrated in The Coming of the Kingdom and elsewhere.

Logos: What does Riddebos bring to the study of eschatology?

Dr. Gaffin: He brings a clear and in-depth demonstration of the elliptical structure of biblical/New Testament eschatology; “eschatology” is to be defined in terms of what has occurred/arrived with the first coming of Christ, as well as what will take place at his second coming.

Logos: What do you consider to be Herman Ridderbos’ most important work?

Dr. Gaffin: Paul: An Outline of His Theology [included in the Herman Ridderbos Collection].

Logos: If I’m new to Ridderbos, which of his writings would be a good introduction?

Dr. Gaffin: I don’t hesitate to recommend When the Time Had Fully Come: Studies in New Testament Theology. Its short chapters provide excellent introductions to his thought and major works.

Be sure to pick up the Herman Ridderbos Collection (9 vols.) before the price goes up January 2!

Get an Archaeology Bundle Before the Price Goes Up!

Over the last century and a half, archaeology in the Middle East has flourished. From the Nag Hammadi library to Tel Dan Stele to the Dead Sea Scrolls, archaeological discoveries have informed biblical scholarship on several levels, giving us a more complete picture of the Bible’s land and culture.

Now, whether you want to dip your toe into the vast world of biblical archaeology, or enhance your library with 36 volumes of important research, we have a bundle just for you.

We’ve hand-selected four bundles of must-haves to start (or continue) your study of archaeology. And don’t worry; if you already own any of the products, dynamic pricing makes sure that you don’t have to pay for them again. Simply add the bundle to your cart to see your special price.

Small Archaeology Bundle (6 vols.)

The small bundle contains six volumes, including Louis Berkhof’s celebrated Biblical Archaeology and two volumes of Archaeology of the Land of the Bible, which talks about what major archaeological discoveries teach us about the Bible.

Medium Archaeology Bundle (10 vols.)

This 10-volume bundle contains all the content from the small bundle, and adds William Mitchell Ramsay’s The Church in the Roman Empire before A.D.170 and several other important works.

Large Archaeology Bundle (15 vols.)

Containing the content from the small and medium bundles, the Large bundle also adds Paul Ash’s David, Solomon and Egypt, in addition to a look at the Tel Dan Stele (the inscription famously referencing the “House of David”), and more.

X-Large Archaeology Bundle (36 vols.)

This bundle gives you the most bang for your buck—all the content from the previous bundles, plus a remarkable array of essays and other writings on early Palestine, the ruins of Nineveh and Babylon, and so much more. Dig deeper into the discoveries that help us understand the context of Scripture.

Don’t miss out on this opportunity to get a wealth of good reading on the fascinating field of archaeology.

Don’t Miss Our Other Bundles!

These are just few of the ways you can customize your library—we have lots of new bundles that cater to your specific interests. Pick up bundles that focus on:

Can’t decide which ones to add to your library? That’s okay—we’ve compiled all this content into three sizes of master bundles. Add tons of new books to your library by picking up the small Master Bundle (142 vols.), the medium Master Bundle (279 vols.), the large Master Bundle (758 vols.), or the extra—large Master Bundle (1,171 vols.).

Already picked up a couple bundles and now want to add one of the Master Bundles to your library? Dynamic pricing will subtract the cost of the items you already own. Simply drop the bundle you want into the shopping cart to see your adjusted price.

Don’t Wait! These Prices Will Go Up

 The price of all of our bundles will double January 3. That’s right—all these bundles will revert to their regular prices so don’t wait. Add incredible content to your library at amazing prices today.

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