The Logos 4 Mac Celebration Continues

giveaway

The Logos 4 Mac Giveaway, one of the most exciting giveaways we have ever done, has come to an end. But don’t worry—the party has just started!

To celebrate the shipping of Logos 4 Mac, we are offering a 20% discount on all of our base packages for a limited time! This means that you can get a deep discount on Platinum, our most popular package. And by using our Payment Plan, you can even spread the discounted price over twelve months. You don’t have to be a Mac enthusiast to take advantage of this great deal.

Are you considering an upgrade? Jump over to our upgrade page. You can also get a discount of up to 20% off on base package upgrades.

If you are already using Logos 4 Mac, make sure that you check out our:

While you’re at it, why not throw one of our Mac Web Banners on your blog or website? Let’s invite some more people to join this celebration!

A Collection of 14 Books on How to be Dogmatic?!?

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No, Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics is not actually about how to be dogmatic (that is, how to present your opinions as unchallengeable or the final word). In the field of theology, dogmatic refers to a study of doctrine. Studies in Dogmatics is a 14 volume work on some of the most important doctrine in church history.

Walter Elwell, Professor Emeritus of Bible and Theology at Wheaton College, had this to say about Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics: “[It is] perhaps the most monumental evangelical theological project of [the last] century. Written in almost conversational style, these volumes deal with topics of theological concern, such as divine election, faith and sanctification, Holy Scripture, and the church, rather than presenting a tightly argued system of thought. . . . Perhaps the outstanding Reformed theologian of this generation, Berkouwer never wavered from his commitment to the principles of Scripture, faith, and grace alone” (Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, pg. 151).

Want to see what you can do with Studies in Dogmatics in Logos Bible Software? Check out my video below.

Interested in a concise book on Reformed doctrine? Pick up Summary of Christian Doctrine by Louis Berkhof for $18. (Both Berkouwer and Louis Berkhof were influenced by Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck.)

Announcing BibleTech 2011!

BibleTech

We are gearing up for BibleTech 2011, which will be held in Seattle, WA, March 25–26. This will be our fourth annual conference focusing on the many ways technology is affecting and being affected by how we translate, interpret, communicate and transmit the Scriptures. BibleTech isn’t just a great opportunity to hear speakers address many of the tech savvy issues that are important to you, but also a chance to interact and network with industry leaders and others who share your interests. Stories abound of the working relationships and friendships initiated at BibleTech conferences.

Calling all presenters!

We are putting out a call for programmers, publishers, tagging experts, information/library scientists, technologists, thought leaders, design gurus, information architects, webmasters, or anyone working at the intersection of the Bible and technology to lead conference sessions and round-table discussions! It is as easy as clicking on entry link filling out the participation form.

We get a lot of entries and we encourage you to be as descriptive as possible when sharing your ideas for topics and content. And, if you have multiple ideas for sessions, feel free to fill out multiple entries.

We will close the call for participation on November 30 so that we can choose the best session speakers for next year. Please have your entry in by then!

Get the latest information about BibleTech 2011

Come “like” us on Facebook and get the latest BibleTech information right in your news feed. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Registration

Register today for $159.95 and guarantee that you don’t miss out on BibleTech 2011!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

What’s New at FreeBookPreview.com?

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If you haven’t downloaded the Logos Bible Software iPhone app, what are you waiting for? It is not only an absolutely free mobile solution for your Bible study needs and an incredible complement to your Logos base package* (giving you access to many of your resources wherever you are), it also gives you free previews of entire Christian books right there on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch.

With FreeBookPreview.com you can examine a book as closely as you want for the preview period. It’s sort of like going to your local bookstore and getting an entire week to really peruse a book before you buy it (except you get to take the text with you, wherever you go). Then—when you love it—you can purchase a print edition right there from the app, or sometimes even add it to your Logos Bible Software resources.

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Daniel Wallace Writes the Foreword to Discourse Grammar

discoursegrammar

Today’s guest post is from Michael Aubrey, on the marketing team.

The name Daniel Wallace is well-known to today’s Greek students. He’s been teaching at Dallas Theological Seminary for years. His invaluable intermediate grammar, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, is used in Bible colleges and seminaries all over the world and in more than two thirds of the schools teaching New Testament Greek in the United States. He’s the senior New Testament editor of the NET Bible and the founder of The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.

Because of Dr. Wallace’s standing in schools and seminaries and his own contributions to Greek grammar, we were so excited when it was confirmed that he would write the foreword to Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament! Steve had originally written the Discourse Grammar in order to fill a gap. In Wallace’s own preface to Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, he had written:

“Contrary to the current trend, this work has no chapter on discourse analysis. . . . DA is too significant a topic to receive merely a token treatment, appended as it were to the end of a book on grammar. It deserves its own full-blown discussion, such as can be found in the works of Cotterell and Turner, D. A. Black, and others.”

And yet, those who have picked up Cotterell and Turner’s Linguistics and Biblical Interpretation or D. A. Black’s Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Discourse Analysis know that the authors of these important volumes never intend their work to function as a comprehensive introduction to discourse grammar. The latter is a collection of high quality, but technical essays on specific topics in discourse analysis (which Steve refers to at several points) and the former has as its central focus issues related to hermeneutics and interpretation rather than grammar.” Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar complements both of these important books by filling in the gap between grammar and interpretation (Cotterell and Turner’s volume) and between traditional grammar and advanced discourse studies (D. A. Black’s book).

And with these realities in mind, we were excited to see these words in Dr. Wallace’s foreword:

This volume is long overdue. Students of the New Testament have been barraged for decades with linguists touting the value of discourse analysis, but few works have demonstrated its importance for exegesis. . . . What Runge has done is to focus on the exegetical significance of discourse grammar for Neutestamenters. He has gathered together several strands of linguistic insights (he calls his approach ‘cross-linguistic’ and ‘function-based’) that are often treated in isolation and sometimes without much more than lip service for exegesis. In short, Runge has made discourse analysis accessible, systematic, comprehensive, and meaningful to students of the New Testament. His presentation is clear, straightforward, and well researched. . . . I have learned a great deal from this volume and will continue to do so for many years. To students of the New Testament, I say, “The time has come. Tolle lege!

Check out Steve’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament for yourself, you’ll be glad that you did!

Now Shipping: Logos 4 Mac

Mac

Today Is the Day!

After a lot of work and tons of anticipation, we are shipping Logos 4 Mac. We are celebrating this tremendous event with special discounts on all of our base packages and base package upgrades!

The completion of Logos 4 Mac is another huge step in our “one license, any platform” philosophy. Logos Bible Software makes it easy to access the resources in your library when and where you need them whether it is on Mac, Windows, iPhone, iPad, or on the web with Biblia.com.

I caught up with David Mitchell, the Macintosh Technical Lead, and asked him a few questions about the release of Logos 4 Mac.

The origins for Logos 4 Mac really go back to the very beginning of Logos 4 right?

Right. In mid-2006, the development team at Logos started working on an incredibly ambitious project that would eventually become Logos 4. We started by throwing out much of the work that had been done since 1999 and re-imagining what Bible study could be like. This was no small decision, but we realized that in order to take a leap forward, we’d need to start over.

So we chose new technologies. We redesigned features. We thought about how to make the product more approachable to the new or casual user. And we wrote code. Lots of code.

How did you get started working on the Mac product and where did you go from there?

About halfway through the development cycle for Logos 4, Libronix 1.0 for Mac was released, and I was given the opportunity to shift my attention to building Logos 4 for Mac. As we had done with Libronix for Windows, I eventually decided to scrap Libronix for Mac so that we could use all of new the code that had been written for Logos 4 for Windows. This, too, was no small decision, but we knew that it had to be done if we wanted to make the best Bible study experience anywhere available to Mac users.

So we chose even more new technologies. We redesigned code so that it was more portable. We thought about how the ideas we had come up with for Logos 4 would fit best within the context of a Macintosh application. And we hired developers: the team working on Logos 4 for Macintosh today is the same size that the Windows team was when I joined in early 2006.

It sounds like it was a lot of work.

Along the way, many on the team have endured sleepless nights working on code or helping just one more user on the forums. We opened an office in Bellevue and brought in extra developers to help us finish more quickly. And we were robbed . . . twice.

Catching up to the Windows version of Logos 4 has been no small task, but delivering Logos 4 for Mac to you today makes it all worthwhile. I hope everyone enjoys using it as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it.

Logos wants to thank the Mac team for their long hours and tireless work in getting us to where we are today.

Remember, you don’t have to be a Mac user to help us celebrate the release of Logos 4 Mac. Take advantage of our special discounts on all of our base packages and base package upgrades.

Thomas Forsyth Torrance on Logos Bible Software

Torrence
Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

For many, the former University of Edinburgh professor Thomas Forsyth Torrance is best known as the person (alongside the late esteemed Geoffrey Bromiley) responsible for translating Karl Barth’s massive (over 10,000 pages) Church Dogmatics into English and introducing the English-speaking world to the towering theology of Karl Barth.

While we should applaud Torrance for this achievement, we should also keep in mind that he too was a top-notch theologian who spent most of his career working tirelessly for the benefit of the Church through his studies of Patristic theology, the person and work of Jesus Christ, the doctrine of the trinity, our knowledge of God, and reconciling theology and the natural sciences.

Torrance never wavered in his devotion to the Church. Born the oldest son of Chinese missionaries, Torrance began his career not as a professor, but as a parish pastor. This experience helped him develop a deep belief that would shape him the rest of his life: Christian thinking and action is for the glory of God and the benefit of the Church. One of the more famous stories of his life is the 81 year old Torrance traversing the mountains of the Wenchuan area of China carrying a money belt containing 11,200 yuan to help rebuild churches destroyed by the communist takeover in 1935. That’s quite an image for an elder theologian of Torrance’s caliber!

But what about his theology? Currently Logos carries four of his publications. Taken together they form a nice introduction his life’s work.

The first, The Christian Doctrine of God, uses Patristic theology to argue that within the life of God there is trinity in unity and unity in trinity. Or to put it another way: in God’s one being there are three persons—God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and those three persons are one being. For the Christian Church, the doctrine of the trinity isn’t some speculative mind exercise but leads us into a deeper place of worship. Further, he adds, understanding who God is in Himself is to know who God is for us. Because, as Torrance never tires of pointing out, there can be no separation between the being of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit and how He has gone about saving us.

The second, Space, Time, and Incarnation, addresses two of Torrance’s specialties: Church history and the person of Jesus Christ. Space, Time, and Incarnation is unique in that rather than being a standard Christology volume, it looks at the spatial aspects of the incarnation. Namely, Torrance rejects the Greek philosophical tradition that thinks of space in terms of a container in favor of the early Church’s belief that in the incarnation Jesus Christ made space for himself. This view was made most visibly manifest in the Nicene term homoousious whereby Jesus is affirmed as one substance of God the Father and the term perichoresis in which there is a mutual indwelling between the person of the trinity. According to Torrance this has a profound impact on the way we speak of Jesus’ presence in our life and worship, even shaping the way we think scientifically about nature.

Lastly, Torrance is well-known for his work in combing the Christian faith with the work of the natural sciences. Our last two volumes: The Ground and Grammar of Theology and Divine and Contingent Order address these questions. In both volumes Torrance calls both the theologian and natural scientist alike to forgo the dualistic habits of mind that have dominated scientific thinking in a post-Copernicus landscape. Instead, both the theologian and the scientist have a scientific obligation to faithfully identify and describe phenomena as they are presented to us without rupturing the world into two realms—the spiritual and the phenomenal. Thus, rather than being competing worldviews both the theologian and the scientist are engaged in an enterprise of faithfully describing what God has presented to us. All persons are God’s priests of creation who are charged by God to identify, name and “to bring to expression the manifold realities of the created world around him . . . to bring the universe to view and understanding in its inherent harmonies and regularities and thus to allow the basic design, the meaning, of the universe to become disclosed.”

If you are in the market to grow your theology library, you really should look into Thomas Forsyth Torrance. You can also find three of Torrance’s works in the nine volume Science & Theology Collection!

The Mac Giveaway!

We are sorry, the Mac Giveaway expired on Friday, October 1. Please watch for a posting of the winners on the giveaway page!

The official ship date of Logos 4 Mac is right around the corner! The completed version will be rolled out to new and existing users on Friday, October 1, 2010. Wow! That’s only a couple days away! The anticipation around Logos is palpable!

We just wanted to remind you that it is not too late for you to enter the Logos 4 Mac Ship Day Giveaway.

The Giveaway

We wanted everyone to share in our excitement for the Logos 4 Mac ship date. So, we decided to do our biggest giveaway ever. How big? We are giving away 105 valuable prizes to 105 different winners! The prizes include:

  • A 21.5″, 3.06GHz iMac worth $1,199.00
  • A 13″, 2.4GHz Macbook Pro worth $1,199.00
  • A 16GB Wi-Fi iPad worth $499.00
  • An 8GB iPod Touch worth $199.00
  • An 8GB Silver iPod Nano worth $149.00
  • Twenty $25 Apple Store gift cards
  • Thirty $15 iTunes gift cards
  • and fifty $10 Logos.com gift cards

How Do I Enter?

There are multiple ways to enter the giveaway, and you may do all of them. Several of the ways to enter can be done only once, but a few may be done multiple times! All the information you need to enter can be found at this link!

Don’t Forget About the Sale on Base Packages!

For a limited time, we are offering a special launch discount—20% off on all of our base packages and up to 20% off of upgrades. You don’t have to be a Mac user to take advantage of this deal!

So come one, come all. Take advantage of our deep discounts and huge number of giveaways to celebrate the launch of Logos 4 Mac.

Collections as Virtual Bookshelves

collections

Today’s guest blogger is Thomas Black, a Logos Forum MVP.

Before Logos Bible Software, when I was studying a topic, I would first determine which types of books I wanted to look at (theology, commentary, devotional, etc.). Then I would go to that shelf and one-by-one check the scripture indexes (if they had one) and one-by-one I’d accumulate a stack of books that would need to be copied from, and eventually re-shelved. But with Logos all I have to do is “type a passage and click go,” and I can find out that in my library there are thousands upon thousands of hits on my search. While it would be fun (for me) to read through them all, none of us has that kind of time. What I needed in Logos was a way to separate my thousands of books into “shelves” so I can search just a few types of books. Fortunately, Logos has made that feature available with collections.

Collections are just like those shelves in my office, only better, because properly constructed, they will fill themselves with the right books.

I recently attended a Morris Proctor Seminar and, while I was familiar enough with the program as a forum MVP, for some reason I continued to be baffled by collections. Morris ably demonstrated in an easy to follow manner the power and potential of easy to build collections.
First the HOW:

To create a new collection click tools>collections and then make sure you’re working on a new collection (screenshot). In Logos 4 we can build collections based upon fields used in the Library such as “title, author, subject” (for a complete list consult the Logos Wiki on Collections.)

First, let’s call this collection “Systematic Theologies.” Then using the title field I can restrict my collection to only those books which contain keywords likely to be in the title of Theology books. In the “start with resources matching” line type the following (or cut and paste) title:(theology,dogmatics,fundamentals,doctrine). This will gives us any books in our Library which contain any of those four keywords. That results in quite a list, but if you own and want to keep the Journal of Evangelical Theology out of your collection, add the ANDNOT boolean operator and the type field to actually remove extra books from your collection title:(theology,dogmatics,fundamentals,doctrine) ANDNOT type:journal, title:”evangelical review”.

Any other extra books you may not want in your collection, such as Toward a Theology of Theological Education you can drag and drop into the “Minus these resources” area.

Now when I’m doing a study on Luke 3:2 and the concurrently listed high priesthood of both Annas and Caiaphas, but I want to specifically see what just my theology books have to say about this, I can open a search panel and set it to search only my Systematic Theology Collection (screenshot). Now I get only 11 articles I need to investigate instead of 991. That’s a powerful trade-off.

Take the time to learn collections, and you can amp up your study with focused searching in dynamic collections. Oh, and the dynamic part? Just purchase another theology book like Robert Culver’s Systematic Theology and it is automatically included in your next focused search.

For further reading check out:
Collections on the Logos Wiki, or Creating Collections in Logos 4 in Logos Training.

RefTagger Is Now Backed by Biblia.com

RefTaggerToday’s guest post is by Bryan Smith, from the Logos Bible Software Web Development team, and development lead on Biblia.com.

Way back in February of 2008, we announced RefTagger, our free tool for transforming Bible references on the web. If you run a site that contains Bible references, you can add RefTagger’s JavaScript snippet in just a few minutes. RefTagger will instantly convert references on your site into links to the full text of the passage. Hovering over a reference link will display a small tooltip with up to 280 characters of the passage, so readers don’t even need to leave your site. In the 2 ½ years since its launch, RefTagger has linked 5 billion Bible references, helping millions of people to dive deeper into their studies. See just a few of the sites currently using RefTagger.

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