Catena Aurea Is Shipping Soon!

Middle Ages
Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager on the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

We’ve discussed the Catena Aurea on the blog before, but before the special Pre-Pub price expires, I wanted to share how excited I am about its completion.

For those unfamiliar with it, the Catena Aurea is a commentary on the Gospels made up of quotations from Church Fathers and other commentators compiled by Thomas Aquinas. The English translation was edited by yet another great theological mind, John Henry Newman. An earlier post from Rosie Perera explains very well how great a resource this is, but I want to explain the benefits of the Logos edition in particular.

Aside from the basic advantages of a Logos edition—like higher accuracy in the capture of the text—there are a few specific things that we’ve done to make the Catena Aurea more usable than ever.

For one thing, print editions of the Catena Aurea have a very compact format, with patristic quotations strung together in long paragraphs and their sources only indicated by brief abbreviations and marginal notes.

In the Logos edition, we’ve added spacing to make the quotations easier to see. We’ve expanded, standardized (and, where necessary, disambiguated) the abbreviations for Church Fathers names to allow for easy identification of the source and consistent searching across the volumes. We’ve added pop-ups giving information from the front matter identifying who an author is and when he wrote, and we’ve moved marginal references into more precise locations in the body text.

Most of all, we’ve linked around 3,000 patristic references that are found in the Early Church Fathers, so that, in combination with that set (in either the Protestant or Catholic editions), you can instantly explore the broader context of many of the quotes. This makes it easy to use the Catena as a starting point for deeper study of the Church Fathers and, since the quotes in the Catena are often very brief and are occasionally condensed from longer passages, it can sometimes be particularly important for establishing the complete thought of the author.

With linking of Bible references, indexing by Bible verse, and integration as a commentary into your Passage Guide, this makes the Logos edition more powerful and easy to use than anything else available.

Even at full price of $139.99, the Logos edition of the Catena Aurea is a bargain, when you consider that you’re getting a richer, more powerful resource than comparably priced print sets, but until November 30, you can get it at the special Pre-Pub price. Don’t miss out!

Training Resources from Morris Proctor


If you are a regular reader of the Logos blog you know that Monday is typically set aside for Morris Proctor’s training posts. Morris Proctor is the certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. His blog posts are a regular feature, giving insight into getting the most out of Logos 4.

If you look over the last couple of weeks you will find great training tips like:

This is just the beginning of the training that is made available weekly at

In addition to these weekly tips, Morris also leads Camp Logos training seminars around the country. These two-day training sessions in using Logos 4 for Bible study have been a valuable resource for equipping even the most seasoned Logos 4 users. Logos forum MVP, Thomas Black, shared with Logos blog readers just how much he got out of the Camp Logos seminar.

Check the schedule for a listing of upcoming Camp Logos events near you, or join us for “National Camp Logos,” held in Bellingham, Washington, each summer. Next year’s National Camp Logos will be held June 9-10, 2011. If you can make it, you can also enjoy a tour of Logos!

Camp Logos is not the only way to receive training in Logos 4. Morris Proctor also has a number of great resources available from Logos Bible Software.

Make sure you are getting the most out of Logos 4 with these valuable training tools!

Has Christianity Failed You on

Ravi Zacharias

Zondervan and is offering a free opportunity to examine Ravi Zacharias’ Has Christianity Failed You. During the week of November 7–11, you can preview Has Christianity Failed You in its entirety on the free Logos Bible Software iPhone/iPad app.

Ravi Zacharias is known for tackling difficult issues with intellectual vigor and genuine sensitivity. In Has Christianity Failed You, Zacharias compassionately wrestles with many of the questions that cause believers to nurse silent doubts or walk away from the Church altogether. The odds are that if you are not struggling with your own crises of faith—you know someone who is!

Head over to and get instructions on how to get the free preview. Or simply download the free app and enjoy your preview.

What Happened Between Augustine and Martin Luther?

Middle Ages
Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager on the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.Popular views of the Middle Ages are often shaped more by Monty Python caricatures than by reality. Far from being a parenthesis in the progress of human learning and achievement that can be mostly ignored, the religious, political and philosophical developments of the medieval era are crucial for understanding the subsequent history of the West and the shape of the modern world. This is particularly true for the areas of church history and theology.

From Gregory VII to St. Francis to Jan Hus, the late Middle Ages were alive with movements to purify and reform society and the Church that presaged the changes of the Reformation era and left their mark on every form of Western Christianity. Meanwhile, the formation of the scholastic synthesis—and its eventual unraveling—are critical for understanding many Reformation-era controversies.

Logos offers some great resources for delving into the Christian thought of the medieval world, including the Summa Theologica and Summa Contra Gentiles of Thomas Aquinas, the major works of Anselm of Canterbury, a collection of writings of the Venerable Bede, and a Catholic Spirituality Collection that includes writings of Bernard of Clairvaux, Francis of Asissi and Thomas à Kempis.

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Seven Great Eschatological Resources

Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“This is the end—for me the beginning of life.”

German pastor-theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer spoke these famous last words to his fellow prisons at the Flossenbürg concentration camp where he was imprisoned as a conspirator against the Nazi regime.

For Bonhoeffer, and many of us, the end of our earthly life is the beginning of an even greater journey: eternal life with God. But for most of us, figuring out what this means exactly is a bit trickier. To further complicate matters, Christian eschatology (the systematic study of the Last Things) is often full of rabbit trails, speculation, and esoteric biblical imagery. Finally, there are so many different biblically supported positions concerning Eschatology; it’s difficult to know where to even begin.

Hopefully this list will be a nice primer on resources that might aid you in your Biblical studies of eschatology.

  • George Ladd—The Last Things: An Eschatology for Layman

    The late Fuller Theological Seminary professor is best known for articulating the “now/not yet” nature of the Kingdom of God. God’s kingdom has been fulfilled within history in Jesus Christ but awaits its consummation at the end of history. In this volume, Ladd guides us through the Biblical witness concerning the End Times.

  • Loraine Boettner—The Millennium

    In this volume, Reformed thinker Loraine Boettner examines the relative merits, weaknesses, and Biblical support for the three three major positions concerning the Second Coming of Christ and the future of God’s Kingdom: amillenialism, premillenialism, and Boettner’s preferred position: postmillennialism.

  • Thomas Oden—Systematic Theology (3 vol.)

    Life in the Spirit, the third volume of Methodist theologian Oden’s towering systematic draws from the deep cistern classical Christianity in examining the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church universal and the individual believer. Concluding with a discussion on eschatology, the Last Things are far from a theological addendum but instead includes both “the end and meaning of the whole of human history” (p. 371).

  • Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

  • Thomas Aquinas—Catena Auraea: Commentary on the Four Gospels

    Eschatology as a discipline didn’t begin yesterday. We have much to learn from the past. Summa Theologica is an outstanding source for any topic, but is especially important for providing much of the basis for Roman Catholic thought over the last 700 years. As a compilation of Patristic commentary on the Gospels, Catena Auraea is unique in that it affords you to get a sneak peak on how the Church has historically interpreted the Gospel passages concerning the End Times.

  • Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times

    As a dictionary, J. Daniel Hays, J. Scott Duvall, and C. Marvin Pate have edited a simple but thorough tool that helps you both identify the terms and issues surrounding prophecy in the Bible. As you study those often obtuse passages concerning the Last Things, this will be a resource your reach for time and time again.

  • The Future as God’s Gift: Explorations in Christian Eschatology

    Not for beginnings, but as a collection of scholarly essays concerning related topics such as the nature of time, the practice of hope, and the future of creation you’ll have food for thought on the ways eschatology might shape our Christian faith and practice in the 21st century.

Get Your Bible Study Tip Published


Today’s guest post is from Rebecca Kruyswijk, the Associate Editor of Bible Study Magazine.

If you subscribe to Bible Study Magazine, you may have come across a new section in the Nov-Dec ‘10 issue: Bible Study Tips. In this issue, we’re publishing Bible study tips from readers like you.

The vision of Bible Study Magazine is to get people into the Word. We’re not looking for a niche readership. We believe that, given the right tools and methods for Bible study, anyone can be a theologian. This has been our mission since Bible Study Magazine went to press two years ago, and it’s still our goal today. (As a side note, it is our birthday and we do accept cake donations.)

It’s not just the experts that have something valuable to say about Bible study. We’re looking for Bible study tips from anyone who is passionate about studying the Word. That’s where you come in. Contribute a Bible study tip. Join the conversation, and perhaps someone might benefit from your perspective.

How can you weigh in for future issues? It’s simple. Go to our Facebook page and “like” us—if you haven’t already. Then post your Bible study tips on our wall. Tips can be short or long, general or specific.

James Hamrick contributed this tip to the Nov-Dec ’10 issue:

“Write down every verb used for God. The God of Genesis is one who sees, learns, walks, speaks and maybe even wrestles.”

And RC Clyde added this:

“Keep it simple: 1) Get a Bible you can understand. 2) Pray to God before you start. 3) Let God show you His Word; don’t draw your own answer. 4) Find a good commentary.”

Take a moment to consider your own Bible study methods, and then share them with the rest of the Bible Study Magazine community. Join the conversation and help someone else get into the Word.

Improving Your Bible Study with Dictionaries

TorrenceToday’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“Don’t let commentaries rob you of the joy of discovery!”

This little bit of advice from my New Testament professor has really stuck with me, and shaped the way I study the Bible. Rather than simply reaching for one of hundreds of great commentaries out there, I now look for another way. It’s not that my professor was against commentaries and forbade us from using them. Far from it. He simply recognized that studying the Bible should be a thrilling adventure full of twists, turns, detours, and discovery. For the student of Scripture, jumping to a commentary was akin to skipping to the final chapter of a novel: you get the gist of what happened, but you miss out in the process. Instead, the commentary should be a conversation partner that helps balance your own discoveries with someone more experienced than you.

This didn’t mean you could simply open a Bible, read a passage once, and expect to understand it completely. There are occasional obscurities and difficulties that need assistance to resolve before we can reach that place of discovery. To aid us in our discovery, he recommended a whole host of tools to put in our box: lexicons, grammars, apparatuses, and my favorite of the bunch—dictionaries.

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Discovering Community on the Logos Forums


Today’s guest blogger is Kevin Becker, a Logos Forum MVP.

My first foray into Logos’ forums was on the day that Logos 4 was released. I was looking to download a particular file but I couldn’t find the download link on Logos’ website. Sure enough, the helpful forum folk provided the link.

I downloaded my software and it started indexing. As I poked around, I realized that, while many things were familiar from Libronix, other things were foreign. I knew I needed help, so I returned to the forum, and I’ve been reading and posting ever since. It’s rewarding to help someone figure out how to leverage Logos to do Bible study. I love imagining people sitting around the world having “Aha!” moments, not just from figuring out how to use Logos’ power but from the discoveries they make as they study God’s word. The forum has become a ministry.

I’ve also reaped great benefits from learning many things from the collective wisdom of forum participants. I wouldn’t know how to use the syntax search with any confidence if not for other gracious forum members teaching me. Logos’ leadership and employees also participate in the forums. My confidence in my e-book investment has grown as I’ve seen them act with grace and wisdom. They really listen to user suggestions; I’ve seen numerous suggestions make their way into Logos 4.

I also love the community on the forums. There are active users from all over the world. I’ve enjoyed learning about different cultures; American, British, and Australian flavors of English are all present, plus many for whom English is a second (or third or fourth or fifth) language. It is a blessing to have a close reminder of the global scope of Christ’s bride.

The most unique cross-cultural experience I’ve had has been helping Ghebreab, an African man living in Germany who uses Logos to prepare for a Bible study. One day, he was having trouble understanding a particular thread on the forum so we started corresponding via email. We then began talking on the telephone and using remote desktop software so I could interact with his computer and show him what I was talking about, step by step. We don’t always understand each other, but I love actually getting to hear the moment when something clicks for Ghebreab, when he grasps how he can use a particular feature of Logos 4 to help him study the Bible and then bring it before his study group. And I get to be a part of it—how cool is that!?

So, in the end, it is not learning how to use Logos, catching the latest news about the company, or running up a ridiculously high post count that keeps me coming back to the forums but the sense of community there, in studying the Bible and helping others. If you don’t use the forum , please stop by and ask your questions and contribute ideas and solutions. I think you’ll find, as I have, that you’ll learn a lot more than how to use your Bible software.

10 Great Anglican Resources on Pre-Pub

Today’s guest post is by Elliot Ritzema, from the Logos Bible Software Design & Editorial team.

With around 400 resources currently on the Pre-Pub page, it can be hard to find a path through all the options to what really may interest you. For example, there are several collections with titles like “The Whole/Complete/Exhaustive/Collected Works of _____.” Some of these people are widely read and recognized. Others you may recognize but don’t know much about. Still others may be names that you’ve never heard of.

To keep from being overwhelmed by all the choices, I like to group resources by something they have in common. For those of you who are Anglican, or interested in Anglican history and theology, here are ten sets currently gathering interest or under development. Here they are, arranged chronologically:

  1. Thomas Cranmer Collection
  2. Cranmer (1489-1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and was Archbishop of Canterbury when the Church of England separated from the Catholic Church. He is responsible for compiling and writing the Book of Common Prayer.

  3. The Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine, Mr. Richard Hooker
  4. Hooker’s (1554-1600) writings, especially Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (in which he tried to find a middle way between Catholicism and Puritanism) were very influential on later Anglicanism as well as political theory.

  5. The Whole Works of the Rev. John Lightfoot
  6. Lightfoot (1602-1675) was a clergyman and rabbinical scholar who attended the Westminster Assembly. This collection includes his account of the first two years of the assembly, among other writings. He is also the author of A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica.

  7. The Works of George Whitefield
  8. Whitefield (1714-1770) was an evangelist who often paid little attention to sectarian distinctions, but I’ve included him here because he was a lifelong member of the Church of England. This collection includes many of his letters and sermons, as well as five biographical works.

  9. The Works of Augustus M. Toplady
  10. He is best known as the writer of the hymn “Rock of Ages.” In early years Toplady (1740-1778) was influenced by John Wesley, but later he became a convinced (and often polemical) Calvinist.

  11. A Practical View of Christianity
  12. William Wilberforce (1759-1833) is famous for his efforts to abolish the slave trade in the British Empire, but he also worked to reform British morality as a whole by encouraging people to adopt “serious religion.” He wrote this book to that end, as is shown by its full title: A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Higher and Middle Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity. It was a bestseller.

  13. Collected Works of John Henry Newman
  14. He famously converted to Catholicism in mid-life (and was recently beatified by the Catholic Church), but Newman (1801-1890) began his public career as an Anglican active in the Oxford Movement. This collection of his writings should be of interest not only to both Catholics and Anglicans, but also those interested in 19th-century English history and lovers of great writing. Excerpts from Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua and The Idea of a University, among other works, have appeared in collections like the Norton Anthology of English Literature.

  15. J.C. Ryle Collection
  16. Ryle (1816-1900) was bishop of Liverpool from 1880 until his death. He was a leader of the evangelical wing of the Church of England, and his writings were influenced by Puritan theology. In turn, his book Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties and Roots influenced a young J.I. Packer.

  17. Joseph Barber Lightfoot Collection
  18. Not to be confused with John Lightfoot, J.B. Lightfoot (1828-1889) was bishop of Durham from 1879 until his death. He is known today primarily as a New Testament and patristic scholar. This collection includes lecture notes, commentary manuscripts and sermons which are not included in his other books that are published by Logos.

  19. Edwin Hatch Collection
  20. Hatch (1835-1889) was a Greek scholar and church historian. His Essays in Biblical Greek is shipping next month. This collection focuses on his historical writing, and includes his controversial The Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church.

    Finally, I will call your attention to a collection that does not deal exclusively with Anglicanism:

  21. Christianity in the British Isles Collection (6 vols)
  22. This collection contains some fantastic and informative resources like Anglicanism and the Christian Church: Theological Resources in Historical Perspective by Paul Avis and The Free Church of England: Introduction to an Anglican Tradition by John Fenwick.

If I haven’t mentioned your favorite Anglican resource on Pre-Pub, feel free to mention them in a comment below.

Introducing the Foundations of Theology Bundle


Have you been looking for a strong collection of theology books to add to your digital library? Or perhaps you have been looking for a good entry level bundle to help you develop your theological resources. Well, look no further. The new Foundations of Theology Bundle is not only a great place to begin growing your theological collection, it is a handpicked selection of formidable titles that will add value to your Logos 4 resources.

The Foundations of Theology Bundle compiles the works of heavyweights from across the theological spectrum. The result is a trustworthy collection of biblically rich materials to enrich your study and understanding.

The titles included in the 15 volume Foundations of Theology Bundle include:

Berkhof’s Systematic Theology

One of the most important and widely-used systematic theologies since its release in 1938, Berkhof’s Systematic Theology articulates Reformed theology in the traditions of Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck.

Chafer’s Systematic Theology (8 Vols.)

This has been a seminal resource since its release in 1948. Written by Lewis Sperry Chafer, the founding president of Dallas Theological Seminary and long-time editor of Bibliotheca Sacra, this was the first dispensational, premillenial systematic theology ever published.

Ryrie’s Basic Theology

Written with a clear understanding of the Scriptures and an unpretentious style, Charles Ryrie’s classic Basic Theology is a standard text for many Bible students and pastors. In fact, Ryrie’s theology is required reading for a variety of seminary courses.

Foundations of the Christian Faith by James Montgomery Boice

In one systematic volume, James Boice provides a readable overview of Christian theology. Whether teacher or student, pastor or layperson, Foundations of the Christian Faith will provide a rich source of Scriptural knowledge, covering all the major doctrines of Christianity. Boice maintains a remarkable practicality and thoroughness that have made this a standard reference and text for over two decades.

Systematic Theology (4 vols.) by Norman Geisler

Theologian and apologist Norman Geisler has been one of the most prolific and influential leaders in the area of evangelical apologetics. For over forty years he has studied and defended the faith as an author and as an internationally known speaker and debater. He brings vast experience to his magnum opus, the four volumes of Systematic Theology.

These books—purchased separately—would cost nearly $450.00, but the Foundations of Theology Bundle sells them for $299.95. That’s a savings of about $150.00!

If you are just beginning to compile your theological library, or even if you want to add some incredible resources to your deep theological collection, you can’t go wrong with the Foundations of Theology Bundle.