New Books for the New School Year

The new school year is quickly approaching and Lexham Press has some exciting new books scheduled to release throughout the fall, including introductory grammars for both biblical Greek and Hebrew. Our Fall 2018 Academic Catalog is now available. You’ll find all of our upcoming titles in the catalog, plus a number of our most popular backlist titles. Here are three highlights coming soon, available for pre-order now. [Read more…]

The Intersection of Revelation and Reason

The relationship between human reason and divine revelation has been a perennial topic of discussion among philosophers and systematic theologians. Throughout Church history, Christians have been tempted to make revelation and reason mutually exclusive. But both are essential to a true understanding of the faith.

The inaugural Theology Connect conference—held in Sydney in July 2016—was dedicated to surveying the intersection of revelation and reason. The fruit of this conference has been drawn together in Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology. [Read more…]

Christology: 30 Years of Research. One Book.

Christology blog postLarry W. Hurtado has been one of the leading scholars on early Christology for decades. He has written dozens of articles and a number of books examining not just what early Christians believed or wrote about Jesus but what their devotional practices tell us about the place of Jesus in early Christian worship. Hurtado’s book, Honoring the Son, is a clear and concise distillation of more than 30 years of research into New Testament Christology. [Read more…]

The Two Most Overlooked Pauline Epistles

The letters to the Thessalonians are often overlooked within the Pauline corpus. Paul’s meatier theological writings, such as Romans or Colossians, often get most of the attention, but 1 and 2 Thessalonians are packed with theology, too. In his letters to the church in Thessalonica, Paul helps his brethren consider the true nature of Christ. They also contain some of the clearest eschatological teachings in all of his writings. [Read more…]

Fighting Spiritual Fatigue with True Soul Rest

In the midst of a cacophony of noise, finding true soul rest is nearly impossible. With so many responsibilities and distractions vying for our attention, too many of us have built unhealthy cycles of rest. As a result, we burn ourselves out, striving and straining against God’s intent for our lives. In Soul Rest, Curtis Zackery reveals how our misaligned view of rest has its roots in an identity that is out of rhythm with God. [Read more…]

Speaking the Language of the Inquirer


Christian apologetics is often a difficult subject to tackle. Most books are directed toward Christians, helping them develop an apologetic method. But this approach ignores one of the most important aspects of apologetics: the audience. In his new book, Christianity Considered: A Guide for Skeptics and Seekers, John Frame directly addresses this shortcoming. As he puts it: “My goal is to speak the language of the inquirer, not that of theologians.” For the Christian reader, his work provides a deeper understanding of the intellectual milieu Christian apologetics faces in the modern era. In this excerpt, Frame introduces the structure for his inquiry into the Christian intellectual tradition: [Read more…]

The Fourth Gospel: A Dramatic Masterpiece

John is at once the most complex and the easiest to understand of all the Gospels. If we want a young seeker or new believer to read something that is both clear and filled with the gospel and good basic theology, we give them the Gospel of John. And if we want to study an incredibly deep theological masterpiece that stretches the brightest mind, we open the Gospel of John.

It is perhaps Grant Osborne’s favorite book of the Bible, and enthusiasm for it shines on every page of the newest volume in the Osborne New Testament Commentaries, John Verse by Verse. [Read more…]

JoAnna Hoyt on Writing an Evangelical Exegetical Commentary

Commentary writing is unlike any other type of writing. It’s a long and complex process that requires hundreds of hours of research before even a single word is put to the page. With multiple editorial and review passes that follow, the final product is a culmination of years of work and involves a whole team of people alongside the author.

This interview with JoAnna Hoyt, author of Amos, Jonah, & Micah: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary, will shed some light on this complicated writing process. [Read more…]

A Distinctive Commentary on the Gospels

Many familiar Gospel narratives are filled with geographic details that we gloss over because of our distance from the Holy Land. Yet climate, landscape, natural resources, and other features of geography leave a lasting mark on the societies and cultures that have developed within them. In a world of dirt roads and dry riverbeds, where shepherds watch their flocks in the hills and fishermen mend their nets by the sea, Jesus taught from hill and plain, using the surrounding landscape as the backdrop for his teaching. Jesus’ parables and illustrations are often brimming with geographic clues, but the significance of these distinctive details is often lost on us today.

The Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Gospels puts readers in the sandals of the disciples as they travel throughout Israel with Jesus, explaining the significance of geography for mining the riches of the biblical text. With more than fifty Gospel stories expounded from this important geographical angle, you’re bound to take away something new from these well-worn stories.
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The Wisdom of Christ’s Atonement


Christians around the world will reflect on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ this Easter weekend. In The Reconciling Wisdom of God, Adam Johnson explores the meaning of Jesus’ death and resurrection in light of God’s wisdom, rather than an act of justice. In this excerpt, Johnson reveals how this shift in perspective expands our understanding of Christ’s atonement.

The primary power and efficiency of Christ’s atonement do not lie in his death, for death is but an “uncouth hideous thing.” Rather, the power and efficiency of Christ’s atonement lie in his resurrection. On this side of the resurrection, death has a new countenance, a new hue. Color has been put in his face, and he has become a friend, full of favor and grace. [Read more…]