Share the Faithlife Illustrated Study Bible this Christmas

Books make wonderful presents. That’s why we think the Christmas season is the perfect time to share the treasures of God’s Word with your friends and family. Through December, you’ll find great deals on some of our best print books, with discounts up to 40% off.

One of the best deals we’re offering is on the NIV Faithlife Illustrated Study Bible. The standard hardcover edition is 20% off and all three premium formats are 30% off! [Read more…]

The Collected Thought of a Renowned Theologian

Over the course of his noteworthy career as a theologian, John Frame corresponded prolifically with theologians, pastors, and students, answering their questions on matters of the faith, the church, and the practice of theology.

The Theological Correspondence of John Frame now makes this correspondence available exclusively through Lexham Press and Logos Bible Software. More personal, but no less theologically robust than his academic work, Dr. Frame himself states that this collection of letters is the single most comprehensive account of his theological thought. [Read more…]

$0.99 Deals and up to 60% off Select Lexham Press Titles

We’re offering some of our Lexham Press titles for as low as $0.99 and select titles are up to 60% off this Black Friday weekend. Take advantage of these deals while you can!

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Study Paul’s Most Important Epistle Verse by Verse

In his introduction to Romans Verse by Verse, Grant Osborne makes a grandiose claim: “In AD 57 in the city of Corinth, the Apostle Paul wrote the greatest book ever penned in human history: his letter to the Roman church.” While we can’t prove that statement true or false unequivocally, we can say that Romans is Paul’s most dense and complex epistle. It’s had a profound effect on theology and the understanding of Scripture and the themes of the letter inform the core of what it means to be a Christian. [Read more…]

Uncover Martin Luther’s Trinitarian Theology

Scholars often portray Luther as a heroic revolutionary, totally unlike his peers and forebears. But is this accurate? At times this revolutionary model of Luther has come to some shocking conclusions, particularly concerning the doctrine of the Trinity. In The Trinity and Martin Luther, Christine Helmer uncovers Luther’s trinitarian theology, upending the stereotypes attached to this historic figure.

In this excerpt from the new preface to the revised edition, Helmer shows us how her research led to a new perspective on Luther and the Trinity, giving us valuable context for the place of this work in scholarship. [Read more…]

Coming Soon: Two New Lexham Bible Guides

Since the first volume was released five years ago, the Lexham Bible Guides have become some of our most popular resources. The series has grown to cover the entire Pauline corpus and two volumes on Genesis. Now, two new volumes are on the horizon: Jonah and 1 Peter. Both of these volumes should be released before the end of the year—and now is your last chance to take advantage of the pre-order discount.

The Lexham Bible Guides are designed to do all the work of searching through commentaries, journal articles, and monographs to find the information you need, saving you valuable time by curating all of the best literature in one place.

Get answers to tough questions

The Lexham Bible Guides don’t just present you with raw research data. The curated and annotated notes on the various viewpoints and interpretive options within the text allow you to quickly synthesize a broad range of views on a particular passage. Dense, jargon-filled research is distilled into easy-to-understand comments. Each volume gives you the tools you need to find answers quickly.

For example, the book of Jonah presents a number of interpretive challenges that could be illuminated by a plethora of viewpoints. Let’s look at how scholarship has handled the great fish that swallowed Jonah. Here are three perspectives (among many) presented in the Lexham Bible Guide:

  • Allen (1976, 213) says God snatches his servant from death’s clutches at the last moment. The fish represents Yahweh’s grace, and the incident demonstrates his power over the sea and its creatures. He considers the significance of “three days and three nights” to be uncertain, though he discusses several proposals. (NICOT: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah)
  • Ellison (1986, 374–75) considers “three days and three nights” to be an approximation. He thinks we should ask why God chose the fish and not some floating wreckage to save Jonah: “Miracle is not the gratuitous display of God’s omnipotence, nor is it called out merely because of human need. Taken in its setting, it is probable that every miracle has a spiritual significance hence the use of ‘sign’ to describe it in John.” He contends that, for the book’s original audience, the fish represents Leviathan (see, Pss. 74:13–14; 104:25). The fish itself is secondary, but it demonstrated to the prophet that God’s love is operative in a world under divine control. (The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 7: Daniel and the Minor Prophets)
  • Page (1995, 239–42) discusses why God chose the fish as the way to return Jonah. He seems to prefer the theory that the belly of the fish was a “good place to learn” given Jonah’s awareness of the significance of Leviathan in the Old Testament (Pss. 74:13–14; 104:26). Page considers various options for the meaning of “three days and three nights” and concludes that “no compelling reason exists to disbelieve the literal span of time indicated. In fact, none of the Old Testament allusions of a similar nature are necessarily figurative. The major point is that God, through the fish, could sustain this pouting prophet during ‘unbelievable’ circumstances and return him to the place where he could renew his commission to serve.” (NAC: Amos, Obadiah, Jonah)

We have three perspectives that emphasize God’s sovereign power over nature, each with their own unique analysis on the biblical account. And if you have any of those commentaries referenced in the Bible Guide, you’ll be able to navigate directly to the relevant section in them with the inline links.

Save time and money

Jumpstart your research. Pre-order Lexham Bible Guide: Jonah and Lexham Bible Guide: 1 Peter today!

The Seven Deadly Sins of Pastoral Ministry

We are all tempted to believe lies about our identities that shape our daily lives. As Dayton Hartman puts it, “Our hearts, apart from God’s regenerating grace, are literally lie-producing and lie-believing machines.” But Hartman is convinced there are unique lies that pastors often believe, specifically related to their identity as a pastor.

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A Blueprint for Biblical Leadership

Sound Christian doctrine and good Christian living are intimately tied together. You cannot have one without the other. This is especially true for church leaders. In his letter to Titus, the Apostle Paul implores the reader to take truth seriously and to ensure that the good news of gospel is being passed on in its full force. The twin themes of doctrine and a passion for godly life are woven throughout this short epistle. In Living Doctrine, Danny Akin unpacks this powerful message and shows how these themes are still vital for Christians today.

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10 Quotes That Challenge the Way You Study the Bible

The Bible is mysterious, surprising—and often deeply misunderstood. There are many passages in Scripture that communicate important ideas and events clearly and simply, transcending differences in language and context. But there are also many passages that are downright perplexing, unusual, or weird. Studying these challenging parts of the Bible requires us to connect to the context of the biblical writers.

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The Importance of Racial Diversity in the Church

Walter Strickland speaking at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

On Wednesday, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary held an event to celebrate the release of Plain Theology for Plain People. Speaking at the event, Walter Strickland II said, “My challenge to Evangelicals is to seek out theological dialogue partners of different races and ethnic backgrounds.” Diversity in the church is a critically important concern today, just as it was 100 years ago, and will be 100 years from now. The work of Charles Octavius Boothe provides us with an opportunity to engage with a historically muted perspective. Plain Theology for Plain People may be over 100 years old, but it is no less important today than when it was first published.

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