Meet Your Champions: A Little about the Winning Bundles and Courses

Logos March Matchups is a wrap—but the deals are just beginning.

Meet your champions.

At the above link, you can browse the two winners—the Hebrews bundle and the Gospels and History Mobile Ed bundle—as well as the runners-up in both categories.

Here’s a bit of commentary on each one:

Hebrews

I cannot believe the commentaries included here, and which ones are under $10!

Jump on these fast:

Also, while not under $10, Paul Ellingworth’s commentary is worth a look—it’s part of NIGTC.

Personally, Hebrews is my second-favorite New Testament book (behind Ephesians), so I was pleased to see this one win. I hope many will take advantage of the great commentaries on this incredibly important book.

Shop the Hebrews bundle.

Mobile Ed: The Gospels and History 

I’ll let the professors of the courses in this bundle do the talking:

 

Learn more about this course bundle.

Logos runner-up: John

Again, some wonderful commentaries are in this bundle—and on such a wonderful book of the Bible. John’s Gospel is obviously unique from the other three, rich with trinitarian theology and Old Testament allusions.

I highly recommend these two from the collection:

  • D.A. Carson’s work from the Pillar New Testament Commentary Series —named the #1 commentary on John by bestcommentaries.com ($18.06)
  • John Verse By Verse, by the late Grant Osborne. Dr. Osborne dedicated his life to studying the Gospels and taught Johaninne literature for many years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. This commentary finds him in his wheelhouse. ($11.18)

Shop more from the John bundle.

Mobile Ed runner-up: Jesus and the World He Lived In

Read even one page of any Gospel, and you can see how rooted they are in the geography, culture, religion, and politics of the time.

This bundle will give you a thorough understanding of those Gospels so that you don’t read them as a twenty-first-century reader but as a first-century one.

Explore this bundle.  

Consistent Inconsistency in the Book of Revelation

The Destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem (1867) by Francesco Hayez 1

Is the book of Revelation a linear chronology of distant future events? Or does the book describe the Roman persecution of Christians and Rome’s destruction of the temple—events that occurred in John’s lifetime? The first view opts for a mid-AD 90s authorship (long after the temple was destroyed), the second supports a pre-AD 70s authorship (when the temple was still standing). Each of these readings is complicated by Revelation 11:1–2:

Then I was given a measuring rod like a staff, and I was told, “Rise and measure the temple of God and the altar and those who worship there, but do not measure the court outside the temple; leave that out, for it is given over to the nations, and they will trample the holy city for forty-two months.”

Taken literally, these verses indicate the Jerusalem temple still stands—apparent proof that Revelation was written before ad 70. If so, the idea that John is describing the Roman persecution and invasion—empowered by Satan and his hatred for the Church—must be valid. However, while the defense of this view takes this passage literally, most people who prefer to see Revelation written before ad 70 read the rest of Revelation symbolically, matching John’s descriptions to some feature of the Roman Empire and its caesars.

Those who read Revelation in terms of distant future events often point to the mid-90s authorship. They prefer a symbolic reading of Revelation 11—a departure from their preference for taking the rest of Revelation quite literally (even to the point of describing futuristic military weaponry in John’s visions).

Who is the literalist now? It’s difficult to be consistent in the book of Revelation.

The Early Church Father Clement of Rome offers us clues for understanding how this passage might be understood. Clement wrote long after the Jerusalem temple had been destroyed, but he used the present tense when speaking of the temple (1 Clement 40–41). He does this to strike an analogy between the orderly worship of the temple in times past with a current concern about worship. The same may be true of Revelation 11:1–2. It’s not unusual for biblical writers to speak of a past event in language that sounds contemporary. In other words, the temple might be long gone, but references to it serve some other literary or theological purpose taking center stage in the writer’s mind. Nonetheless, this doesn’t exclude the possibility of interpreting Revelation in light of events in Rome. It just proves that neither approach can be fully accepted.

When reading a complicated book like Revelation, it’s helpful to address where views deviate in their interpretive approach. It might be more revealing than we ever expected.

***

why is the bible hard to understandDr. Michael S. Heiser is a scholar-in-residence for Faithlife, the makers of Logos Bible Software. He is the author of The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible and has taught many Mobile Ed courses, including Problems in Biblical Interpretation: Difficult Passages I.

This article is excerpted from Dr. Heiser’s book I Dare You Not to Bore Me with the Bible.

Discover more fascinating aspects of the Bible with Dr. Heiser

Keep exploring the strange, perplexing, and mysterious aspects of the Bible with these excerpts from Dr. Michael S. Heiser’s The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible. Or dive deeper into the supernatural world of the Bible and pick up a copy of The Unseen Realm today.

 

 

 

Flash Sale: Tim Keller Theology and Ministry Bundles

“Fifty years from now, if evangelical Christians are widely known for their love of cities, their commitment to mercy and justice, and their love of their neighbors, Tim Keller will be remembered as a pioneer of the new urban Christians.” Christianity Today

Timothy Keller is a New York Times bestselling author, founder of New York City’s Redeemer Presbyterian Church, and cofounder with D.A. Carson of The Gospel Coalition.

His writings, which tend to have an apologetic bent, have challenged many unbelievers and equipped many believers to hold and share their faith with confidence.

For just two weeks, you can get Keller’s collected works on sale in the Logos format, with three different options:

With Logos, ebooks are transformed into library resources. A simple search in Logos shows you relevant insights from these books so you can access them easily in your studies.

Here’s what’s in the ministry and theology bundles.

Ministry bundle

  • The Meaning of Marriage: Facing the Complexities of Commitment with the Wisdom of God – In this book, Keller and his wife Kathy offer instruction on how to have a healthy marriage. It’s essential reading for anyone who wants to know God and love more deeply in this life, single or married.
  • Every Good Endeavor – Keller has taught and counseled students, young professionals, and senior leaders on the subject of work and calling for more than twenty years. Here he pulls insights into a thoughtful and practical book for readers everywhere.
  • Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering – With biblical wisdom and personal stories of overcoming adversity to bring a much-needed, Keller brings a fresh viewpoint to this important issue. It’s as much an apologetic of the Christian faith as a guide to suffering well.
  • Preaching: Communicating Faith in an Age of Skepticism – Keller helps readers learn to present the Christian message of grace in a more engaging, passionate, and compassionate way.
  • Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God – This work offers biblical guidance as well as specific prayers for certain situations, such as dealing with grief, loss, love, and forgiveness.

Theology bundle

  • The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism – As one of Keller’s most popular and respected works, this book winsomely addresses the frequent doubts that skeptics and non-believers bring to religion.
  • The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith – Keller uses the parable of the prodigal son to reveal an unexpected message of hope and salvation.
  • Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that MattersThe subtitle says it all. This book exposes America’s favorite idols and how God surpasses each one.
  • Generous Justice: How God’s Grace Makes Us JustKeller presents the Bible as a fundamental source for promoting justice and compassion for those in need.
  • Jesus the King: Understanding the Life and Death of the Son of God – Keller unfolds the Gospel of Mark to show how the story of Jesus is at once cosmic, historical, and personal, calling each of us to look anew at our relationship with God.

***

Shop the Timothy Keller collected works saleavailable for a short time—now through April 8.

Is the Jezreel Valley the Stage for the Final Battle?

It’s been called the “heart” of the promised land—a 141-square-mile triangle in the north-central area of Israel.

Today, the Jezreel Valley is Israel’s breadbasket. A beautiful plain of fertile fields and winding roads, it’s hemmed in by rolling mountains that offer stunning scenic views. [Read more…]

And the Winner Is . . .

The true and better bundle. The great high champion. The winner once and for all.

Ladies and gentlemen, your Logos March Matchup winning bundle is: [Read more…]

3 Reasons Every Preacher Should Bid on This Series

“Alas! One of the ‘Logos moments’ for which I have been waiting! This cornucopia of homiletic input has regularly been my last phase of sermon preparation.”

That is what one preacher had to say about the Biblical Illustrator: New Testament Collection coming to Logos. [Read more…]

3 Sanity Checks for Odd Bible Interpretations

I was just having lunch with some pastors, and we were having a friendly disagreement over exegesis. One experienced expositor said, “The Holy Spirit chose precisely this word and not another, so it must have special significance.” I said, “Yes, but we can’t overinterpret: Greek is a human language; it’s not some perfectly precise mathematics problem.” [Read more…]

Learning Logos: How to Quickly Make Verse Slides from Resource Text

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If you’re a preacher, teacher, or small group leader, there’s a good chance this scenario has happened to you:

You’re reading in a commentary, study guide, book of outlines, or journal where you come across a list of Scripture verses the author mentions. You think to yourself, “I need those verses on slides to display for my listeners.” So you (or someone close to you) begin the tedious task of making verse slides for presentation. [Read more…]

Before You Preach a Narrative Text, Study Your Hero

Samson Slaying the Lion (1628) by Peter Paul Rubens


You will preach narrative far better if you know this literary archetype.

The Bible is full of stories, and most of them revolve around a hero. From Abraham to Moses to Deborah to the True and Better Hero, much of Scripture is a hero’s journey. [Read more…]

Don’t Read Past This Important Word in Genesis 20:7

Abraham’s Journey from Ur to Canaan by József Molnár

“Now return the man’s wife, for he is a prophet, and he will pray for you and you will live. But if you do not return her, you may be sure that you and all who belong to you will die.” — Genesis 20:7

In the drama of the broader story of Genesis 20, we risk missing something quite significant for biblical theology: Abraham is named a prophet. [Read more…]