A Commentary for the Most Neglected Part of Your Sermon

Every preacher knows it’s easy to explain a text without moving into theological reflection. It’s even easier to stop short of application.

Yet no sermon is complete without it.

The Treasures of Scripture commentary series (65 vols.), currently half-off on Pre-Pub, is designed especially for this crucial part of the sermon.

A preacher’s commentary

The Treasures of Scripture is truly a preacher’s commentary. It contains:

  • Historical information
  • Alliterated outlines
  • Topical studies
  • Original language word studies
  • Sermon illustrations.

For example, here’s a potent illustration on fearing God, taken from the Job volume:

Charlemagne, it is said, gave instructions to be buried in the royal posture of a king upon his throne, with the Gospels opened on his knees, his sword beside him, and his crown upon his head. When his tomb was later uncovered, there he was. The crown was still perched on his skull, and a bony finger rested on these words: “What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul?”

What an image, and how easy it would be to launch from it into a charge to keep watch over our souls. Though Job had king-like wealth and stature, he feared God. Job, and apparently, Charlemagne, understood that the fear of God and the eternal destiny of our souls were more important than the praise of man or wealth of this world. Flesh may fail, but the word of the Lord stands forever.

The Treasures of Scripture is full of powerful illustrations, not to mention outlines, alliterative helps, and other commentary to aid in preparing for preaching.

What preachers say about it

The commentary is also edifying in its own right. Here is what some pastors and preachers say about it:

“This is excellent material. It is probably the most practical material for sermon preparation of anyone that I have read. I highly recommend it for pastors.”
— Roy Edgemon, former director of discipleship and family ministries, LifeWay Christian Resources

“The books are some of the best material I’ve read and studied. They fed me. It has been a joy and blessing to study these books.”
— Mike Oldham, pastor, Central Baptist Temple, Sanford, North Carolina

“I never thought the presentation of truth could be as practical, clear, timely, and satisfying. The books are like a prepared meal ready to eat.”
— David Tandoc, pastor, Dagapapn City, Philippines

Explore this well-loved pastoral resource, and get it now while it’s half off. The more interest it gathers, the higher the price, so get in early.

Shop now.

Reminder to Grab May’s Free Book—Pastoral Epistles Commentary

This month’s free book is The Pastoral Epistles from the renowned International Critical Commentary series.

We’re almost through May (can you believe it?), which means our monthly sales and free resources are inching toward the door.

So here’s a friendly reminder to grab your free book now, and take a look at the two-volume Acts commentary available for just $5.

You may also be interested in the monthly sale and featured publisher sale

What Is Logos in the Bible? A Short and Extended Answer

More than the name of this blog and our Bible study software, logos (which we pronounce LOW-goess . . .  and LAH-gahss) is an important Greek word in biblical and theological studies.

Logos is arguably the most debated and most discussed word in the Greek New Testament,” writes Douglas Estes in his entry on this word in the Lexham Bible Dictionary (a free resource from Lexham Press).

What does logos mean, and why is it significant for Christian theology and biblical studies? This post, adapted from Estes’ explanation, offers a thorough explanation of the word.

Short answer

Logos (λόγος, logos) is a concept-word in the Bible symbolic of the nature and function of Jesus Christ. It is also used to refer to the revelation of God in the world.

Introduction to Logos

The Greek word logos simply means “word.” However, along with this most basic definition comes a host of quasi-technical and technical uses of the word logos in the Bible as well as ancient Greek literature. Its most famous usage is John 1:1: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.”

The Meaning of Logos in the Bible

The standard rendering of logos in English is “word.” This holds true in English regardless of whether logos is used in a mundane or technical sense. Over the centuries, and in a variety of languages, other suggestions have been made—such as the recent idea of rendering logos as “message” in English—but none have stuck with any permanency.

There are three primary uses for the word logos in the New Testament:

  1. Logos in its standard meaning designates a word, speech, or the act of speaking (Acts 7:22).
  2. Logos in its special meaning refers to the special revelation of God to people (Mark 7:13).
  3. Logos in its unique meaning personifies the revelation of God as Jesus the Messiah (John 1:14).

Since the writers of the New Testament used logos more than 300 times, mostly with the standard meaning, even this range of meaning is quite large. For example, its standard usage can mean:

  • An accounting (Matthew 12:36)
  • A reason (Acts 10:29)
  • An appearance or aural display (Colossians 2:23)
  • A preaching (1 Timothy 5:17)
  • A word (1 Corinthians 1:5)

The wide semantic range of logos lends itself well to theological and philosophical discourse (Phillips, Prologue, 106).

 

 

The Meaning of Logos in the Gospel of John

The leading use of logos in its unique sense occurs in the opening chapter of John’s Gospel. This chapter introduces the idea that Jesus is the Word: the Word that existed prior to creation, the Word that exists in connection to God, the Word that is God, and the Word that became human, cohabited with people, and possessed a glory that can only be described as the glory of God (John 1:1, 14). As the Gospel of John never uses logos in this unique, technical manner again after the first chapter, and never explicitly says that the logos is Jesus, many have speculated that the Word-prologue predates the Gospel in the form of an earlier hymn or liturgy (Schnackenburg, Gospel, 1.224–32; Jeremias, Jesus, 100); however, there is little evidence for this, and attempts to recreate the hymn are highly speculative (Keener, Gospel, 333–37). While there are a multitude of theories for why the Gospel writer selected the logos concept-word, the clear emphasis of the opening of the Gospel and entrance of the Word into the world is cosmological, reflecting the opening of Genesis 1 (Estes, Temporal Mechanics, 107–13).

The Meaning of Logos in the Remainder of the New Testament

There are two other unique, personified uses of logos in the New Testament, both of which are found in the Johannine literature.

  1. In 1 John 1:1, Jesus is referred to as the “Word of life”; both “word” and “life” are significant to John, as this opening to the first letter is related in some way to the opening of the Gospel.
  2. In Revelation 19:13, the returning Messiah is called the “Word of God,” as a reference to His person and work as both the revealed and the revealer.

All of the remaining uses of logos in the New Testament are mostly standard uses, with a small number of special uses mixed in (e.g., Acts 4:31, where logos refers to the gospel message).

The Meaning of Logos in the Old Testament (LXX)

The Old Testament (LXX, or Septuagint, the translation of the Old Testament into Greek) use of logos closely matches both standard and special New Testament uses. As with the New Testament, most uses of logos in the Old Testament fit within the standard semantic range of “word” as speech, utterance, or word. The LXX does make regular use of logos to specify the “word of the Lord” (e.g., Isaiah 1:10, where the LXX translates יהוה־דָּבָר, yhwhdavar), relating to the special proclamation of God in the world. When used this way, logos does not mean the literal words or speech or message of God; instead, it refers to the “dynamic, active communication” of God’s purpose and plan to His people in light of His creative activity (Need, “Re-Reading,” 399). The key difference between the Testaments is that there is no personification of logos in the Old Testament indicative of the Messiah. In Proverbs 8, the Old Testament personifies Wisdom, leading some to believe this is a precursor to the unique, technical use of logos occurring in the Johannine sections of the New Testament.

 

The Historical Background of the Logos Concept

Many theories have been proposed attempting to explain why the Gospel of John introduces Jesus as the Word.

Old Testament Word

This theory proposes that the logos in John simply referred to the Old Testament word for word (דָּבָר, davar) as it related to the revelatory activity of God (the “word of the Lord,” 2 Sam 7:4), and then personified over time from the “word of God” (revelation) to the “Word of God” (Messiah revealed; Carson, Gospel). This theory is the closest literary parallel and thought-milieu to the New Testament. As a result, it has gained a wide range of general acceptance. The lack of evidence showing such a substantial shift in meaning is this theory’s major weakness.

Old Testament Wisdom

In the centuries before the writing of the New Testament, the Jewish concept of Wisdom, or Sophia (σοφία, sophia), was personified as a literary motif in several texts (Proverbs, Wisdom of Solomon, Sirach, Baruch), prompting arguments that “Sophia” is the root idea for Logos (Scott, Sophia). Paul appears to make a weak allusion to these two ideas also (1 Cor 1:24). This theory may be supported by the presence of a divine, personified hypostasis for God in Jewish contexts. The concept of Sophia shares some similarities with “Word.” However, Sophia may simply be a literary motif. Furthermore, it is unclear why the writer of the Gospel of John wouldn’t have simply used sophia instead of logos.

Jewish-Hellenistic Popular Philosophy

Philo (20 BC–AD 50), a Hellenistic Jew from Alexandria, wrote many books combining Hebrew and Greek theology and philosophy; he used logos in many different ways to refer to diverse aspects of God and his activity in the world (Tobin, “Prologue”). This theory is supported by the fact that Philo is a near-contemporary of John. Furthermore, the use of the language has several striking similarities. However, this theory has three major weaknesses:

  1. Philo never appears to personify logos in the same way John does (perhaps due to his strict monotheism).
  2. Philo’s philosophical system is complex and frequently at odds with the Bible’s worldview.
  3. Philo was not influential in his lifetime.

John’s Theology

One theory for the origin of the logos concept in the Gospel of John comes through the evolution of christological thought apparent in Johannine context: after working through the creation of the letters and the text of the Fourth Gospel, wherein the focus is repeatedly on the Christ as the revelation of God, the fourth evangelist may have written the prologue as the fruition and capstone of all of his thoughts on the person and work of Jesus (Miller, “Johannine”). As this theory takes the thought-process of the evangelist seriously, it is elegant and plausible. However, it does not actually answer the question regarding the origin of the concept, as the evangelist must have had some original semantic range for logos.

Greek Philosophy

For Heraclitus and later Stoic philosophers, logos was a symbol of divine reason; it is possible that John borrowed this concept from the Hellenistic milieu in which he wrote (Hook, “Spirit,” 227). While few individuals support this theory today, early church fathers such as Irenaeus and Augustine indirectly favored it. This theory may be plausible, as Greek philosophy did have a pervasive influence, and was accepted by many in the early church. However, there is no direct evidence that the writer of the Fourth Gospel knew or cared about Greek philosophy.

The Torah

In order to place the Gospel of John squarely in Jewish context, this theory proposes that logos is best understood as the incarnated Torah (Reed, Semitic). The theory is based on some parallels between “word” and “law” (νόμος, nomos) in the LXX (Psa 119:15); thus, one could translate John 1:1 as Jacobus Schoneveld did: “In the beginning was the Torah, and the Torah was toward God, and Godlike was the Torah.” This theory’s major strength is that it encourages a Jewish context for reading John. Furthermore, some parallels between “word” and “law” are possible. However, as there is very limited evidence for such a personified reading, this theory has received only limited acceptance.

[…]

No accepted consensus regarding the origin of the logos concept-word exists. This much appears probable: the writer of the Gospel of John knew Greek, and thus must have encountered, to some degree, at least a rudimentary Hellenistic philosophical understanding of the use of logos; however, being first a Jew not a Greek, the author was more concerned about Old Testament thought patterns and contemporary Jewish language customs. Thus, it seems likely that, in the proclamation of the Gospel over time, these strains bore christological fruit for the evangelist, culminating in the unique “Word” concept presented in John 1.

 

 

The Reception of the Logos Concept in Early Church History

The logos concept was a foundational idea for theological development from the start of the early church. Perhaps the earliest Christian document after the New Testament is 1 Clement (ca. AD 95–97), in which the author inserts logos in its special usage of God’s revelation (1 Clement 13.3). First Clement may also contain the first existing unique, technical usage of logos as Jesus outside of the New Testament (if 1 Clement 27.4 is read as an allusion to Colossians 1:16; if not, it is still a very close parallel to John 1:1 and Genesis 1:1). A similar allusion to the logos as God’s revelation/Bible (New Testament) occurs in the Letter of Barnabas 6:17 (ca. AD 100) and Polycarp 7.2 (ca. AD 120).

The first and clearest reference to logos as Christ comes in the letters of Ignatius, a bishop of Antioch, who was martyred ca. AD 110 (To the Magnesians 8.2). By the middle of the second century, the logos concept began to appear in conventional (Letter to Diognetus 12.9), apologetic (Justin Martyr, Irenaeus) and theological (Irenaeus) uses. At the start of the third century, Origen’s focus on the logos as to the nature of Christ signaled the intense interest that Christian theology would put on the word into the future.

Logos in Culture

The logos concept continues to influence Western culture; it is foundational to Christian belief. The Greek idea of logos (with variant connotations) was also a major influence in Heraclitus (ca. 540–480 BC), Isocrates (436–338 BC), Aristotle (384–322 BC), and the Stoics, even becoming part of ancient popular culture (Philo). The concept has continued to influence Western culture since that time, partly due to the philosophical tradition of the logos that resumed post-Fourth Gospel with Neo-Platonism and with various strains of Gnosticism. Propelled through the centuries in its comparison/contrast to Christian theology, the logos continued into modern philosophical discussion with diverse thinkers including Hegel (1770–1831), Edmund Husserl (1859–1938), Carl Jung (1875–1961), and Jacques Derrida (1930–2004).

Without the theology of the Gospel of John, it seems unlikely that logos would have remained popular into late medieval or modern thought. Logos is one of the very few Greek words of the New Testament to be transliterated into English and put into everyday Christian usage.

This post is adapted from Douglas Estes’ “Logos” entry in the Lexham Bible Dictionary. Read the full version and bibliography in the Logos desktop app.

Douglas Estes is associate professor of New Testament and practical theology at South University-Columbia. He’s the author or editor of eight books, and is the editor of Didaktikos. He contributes to publications such as Christianity Today and Bible Study Magazine. Douglas is a fellow in the Center for Pastor Theologians.

 

 

Take a Class with N.T. Wright

N.T. Wright is one of the most—if not the most—well-known New Testament scholars alive today. His writings on justification have spurred much debate, and he’s been named by Christianity Today as one of the top theologians of our time. Formerly the Bishop of Durham, Wright now teaches at the internationally esteemed University of St. Andrew’s.

Right now you can save up to 30% on everything by N.T. Wright in Logos, including his books and courses.

Here’s a trailer for his course on Galatians. He also has courses on Ephesians, Philippians, and Acts.

p> 

In addition to these courses, you can grab dozens of his books for up to 30% off.

Shop this limited-time sale.

What Is Biblical Hearing? Kevin Vanhoozer on Hearing and Doing

Photo by Ilya Ilford on Unsplash

By Kevin Vanhoozer

In perhaps the most famous Arabian Nights story, Aladdin discovers a magic lamp that, when rubbed, produces a genie who invariably responds, “Your wish is my command.” It is the classic response of a servant to his master: “To hear is to obey.”

But in real life there is often a gap, sometimes a yawning chasm, between hearing and obeying. Not everyone is as fortunate as Aladdin: sometimes servants hear, and do half-heartedly; at other times, they hear and do not do at all. Jesus told his own equally compelling stories that illustrate the all-important difference between hearing and doing.

Unusual teaching

The Gospel of Mark introduces Jesus as a teacher who astonished his hearers, “for he taught them as one who had authority” (Mark 1:22). He taught in the synagogue and, later, offered free seaside lectures (Mark 2:13; 4:1). The form of Jesus’ teaching is significant: “And he was teaching them many things in parables” (Mark 4:2).

A parable is an extended metaphor (“the kingdom of God is like …”), a metaphorical narrative—a story in which something extraordinary happens that subverts the ordinary way people think about things.

The first such story Mark recounts is the parable of the sower, which is about different kinds of hearers, represented by the different kinds of soil on which the seed of God’s word falls. Even the disciples did not understand it at first, and this despite Jesus’ obvious hint at the end: “He who has ears to hear, let him hear” (Mark 4:9). The parable they are to hear is itself about hearing God’s word. In particular, the parable explains the kind of hearing Jesus is after: a hearing in which God’s word takes root in a singular and wonderful way. Indeed, this is the extraordinary element in the parable: that a word-seed can multiply its growth a hundredfold.

To hear rightly is to correctly grasp the content of Jesus’ teaching, namely, the strange new world of the kingdom of God.

— Kevin Vanhoozer

This is also a parable of the kingdom of God. Jesus subverts his hearers’ conventional picture of a kingdom as something that can be established by swords and soldiers. Jesus instead proclaims a kingdom established by the right reception of the gospel—the right kind of hearing—rather than military conquest.

Jesus’ parables of the kingdom challenge the prevailing social imaginaries of power, be it ancient Roman imperialism or present-day geopolitics. Jesus taught with authority precisely by announcing a new picture to live by. To hear rightly is to correctly grasp the content of Jesus’ teaching, namely, the strange new world of the kingdom of God.

Hearing and doing

One qualification for being a disciple of Jesus is to be able to follow Jesus’ stories. Yet hearing, even with understanding and apparent agreement, is not enough. Toward the end of his longest lesson, the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus makes an explicit contrast between hearing and doing: “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. … And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand” (Matt 7:24, 26).

True disciples must be hearers and doers of Jesus’ words. The Greek term for the rock on which one builds—bedrock—shows up again later in Matthew 16:18, where Jesus says he will build his church “on this bedrock.” In other words, he who would build Jesus’ church on a rock rather than sand must build it on the bedrock of Jesus’ words. This is confirmed in Luke’s Gospel where, just after the parable of the sower, Jesus says, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it” (Luke 8:21).

As rabbi or Master, Jesus did not want his followers simply to listen to his lessons and then continue living as before. To hear and not do is both to flout the authority of Jesus’ words and to flaunt oneself as lord. Moreover, to hear and not do is the opposite not only of obedience but also of learning. No one learns to swim or ride a bike simply by reading an instruction manual. Jesus desires followers who both listen and learn.

This post is adapted from chapter 3 of Hearers and Doers by Kevin J. Vanhoozer (Lexham Press, 2019).

Learning Logos: How to Easily Navigate Workflow Steps

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 4-1-620x374.png

If we ask 10 Logos users, “What’s the most significant addition to Logos 8?” half will probably say the new Notes tool, and the other half, Workflows. Workflows are literally step-by-step suggested methodologies for biblical research. [Read more…]

Free Logos Bundle: Theology Guide + Survey of Theology

We’re giving systematic theology some love right now at Logos.com, with a unique offer too good to pass up.

For a limited time, you can try the Logos 8 Theology Guide—a feature exclusive to Logos 8 Silver and up—free until June 17.

It also comes with Lexham Press’ Survey of Theology. Together the tools help you get a quick lay of the land on hundreds of theological topics, and then guide you in digging deeper. And the more systematic theologies you have, the heftier the guide is.

To get access to this bundle, just go here and add Logos 8 Basic to your collection. (You won’t lose any books or features you already own.)

It’s that simple.

You’ll have until June 17 to use the Theology Guide to your heart’s delight, and you can fill it out even more by grabbing systematic theologies on sale—up to 44% off. (The resources stay with you even after the trial ends.)

Featured authors in this theology sale include:

  • Millard Erickson
  • Norman Geisler
  • John Frame
  • Carl F.H. Henry
  • Michael Bird
  • Michael Horton
  • Thomas Oden
  • John Calvin
  • Herman Bavinck
  • And more

There are also several Mobile Ed theology courses available.

Get the Logos Theology Guide and Lexham’s Survey of Theology free, then pack your library with other systematic theologies while the sale lasts.

Jump on these offers.

What People Are Saying about the ICC Series—Now on Sale

The lauded International Critical Commentary Series (ICC) (62 vols.) is 40% off in May. As one of the most thorough critical commentaries around, this is a stellar deal.

Here’s what serious students of Scripture like you say about this renowned series. [Read more…]

New Series from Lexham Press: the Best of Christianity Today

Since 1956, Christianity Today has been the leading voice for evangelicalism in America—a bellwether of theology, politics, and culture for evangelicals. Some of the most influential and respected modern evangelical leaders have written for the magazine, including John Stott, Carl F.H. Henry, F.F. Bruce, Cornelius Van Til, J.I. Packer, and others.  

Now, the best of Christianity Today is being collected into books, and the first three are available for pre-order today.

These books mark the beginning of a three-year project between CT and Lexham Press, the publishing imprint of Faithlife, makers of Logos Bible Software.

Here’s a bit about each book.

The best of Carl F.H. Henry

Architect of Evangelicalism

No one is better equipped to provide a clear understanding of evangelicalism than the late Carl F.H. Henry, the founding editor of Christianity Today and an extremely influential theologian of American evangelicalism in the twentieth century. Architect of Evangelicalism helps us gain a better sense of the roots of American evangelicalism by giving us the best of Carl F.H. Henry’s Christianity Today essays.

 

 

 

Leading scholars on essential doctrines

Basics of the Faith

This work is an overview of essential Christian doctrines from some of the best minds of mid-twentieth-century evangelicalism around the globe. Originally appearing in the pages of Christianity Today in 1961–1962, this collection includes essays from influential theologians and biblical scholars. Basics of the Faith includes an introduction by Kevin J. Vanhoozer that lays out their original context and evaluates their ongoing significance.

 

 

 

John Stott on Jesus’ lordship

Christ the Cornerstone

The late Anglican pastor John R.W. Stott was committed to the notion that Jesus’ lordship has ramifications for all of life. Out of this conviction grew his contention that the whole mission of God includes both evangelism and social action. Christ the Cornerstone recovers several decades of his writings on this topic from the pages of Christianity Today, including the regular “Cornerstone” column he wrote from 1977–1981.

 

 

Learn more at LexhamPress.com/Christianity-Today.

Own a $10,000 Library for $55 a Month

If you’ve been wanting to invest in Logos Bible Software but were waiting for a big discount, your patience has paid off.

All Logos 8 packages are 20% off for a limited time—all of them.

Here’s the quick rundown on why packages in Logos are such a good investment, and how you can own a library worth more than $10,000 in less than two years by paying just $55 a month.

Get the right library for you

Libraries aren’t one-size-fits-all. Choose from dozens of different libraries based on your needs.

For example:

  • Standard libraries
  • Academic libraries
  • Denomination-specific libraries

Standard libraries

These libraries are for people looking for a well-rounded library representing the best of evangelical and traditional Christian theology. You’ll find respected works such as the Pillar New Testament Commentary series (PNTC), The New American Commentary Series, and loads of Bible dictionaries, encyclopedias, devotionals, and sermon outlines.

Academic libraries

These packages are built with academics in mind. (Bonus: if you’re a student, faculty, or academic staff, you can save 30% or more on Logos 8 packages when you enroll in our Academic Discount Program.) These Academic packages contain more scholarly research helps and original language resources than our Standard packages.

Denomination-specific libraries

These packages are specially curated to major on resources in line with your preferred tradition. Denominations and traditions available include:

  • Baptist
  • Methodist & Wesleyan
  • Pentecostal & Charismatic
  • Reformed
  • And more

Take a look at what’s in each library to see which package is the best fit for your ministry.

Get tools for faster, deeper study

Whether you’re a student, Bible teacher, pastor, or missionary, time is of the essence.

One huge benefit of Logos is that all your books stay open right where you left them, so you never lose time getting back into your studies.

But that’s just the beginning. You can also:

  • Launch a Word Study with one click
  • Scroll resources in sync
  • Automatically cite your research
  • Analyze Scripture with interactive visual aids
  • Run searches on just about anything

Plus, Logos 8 comes with exciting new features like the Theology Guide, Workflows, Canvas, and updated Notes for even more streamlined study.

Learn more about the Bible study tools in Logos 8.

Get a giant library now for just $55 down

The packages you can get in Logos are an incredible value—in most cases, you’re saving around 90% when you buy a Logos package compared to building your library book by book.

Even so, we don’t want cost to keep you from getting tools that could have a massive impact on your ministry.

That’s why you can get payment plans on purchases over $100. You can get the leading Bible software for one short-term monthly payment, and then permanently own Logos in less than two years.

And now’s the time to buy, because all Logos 8 packages are 20% off this month.

So let’s say you’re considering Logos 8 Silver. Here’s what a payment plan would look like:

Regular price: $999.99
Price of library if books were bought separately: $10,898
Sale price: $799.99 (20% off this month!)
Due today: $55.14
Monthly payment: $54.99
Last payment date: 15 months from today

Logos payment plans allow you to progressively buy a package interest-free—it’s not a subscription. The only extra you pay is a $5/mo. administrative fee that covers overhead costs. Your payments are set for the length of time you choose, and they only continue if you decide to get more Logos products on payment plans.

Got more payment plan questions? Check out our FAQ, or call one of our resource experts at 800-875-6467.

How to choose the Logos payment plan option

Just follow these brief steps:

  1. Add your favorite Logos 8 package to your cart.
  2. Look at your cart. On the left side, you’ll see payment options.
  3. Choose the monthly payment that fits your budget best, and enter your phone number.
  4. Hit Next, then enter your payment info.
  5. That’s it! Once you’ve made your initial payment, your payments automatically deduct from your account each month. We’ll send a reminder a few days before the payment goes through.

Get Logos 8 today.