Search Results for: lighter side of discourse analysis

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Segmentation

For the final installation in the series, "The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis," Dr. Steve Runge serves up some spicy discourse for you! Here, he highlights the flavors of Segmentation, another concept covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

If you still have not done so, be sure to serve up your own discourse by placing your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Segmentation

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Though Runge’s Discourse Grammar does not seek to replace traditional approaches to understanding and explicating the grammar and syntax of New Testament Greek, it provides a whole new range of conceptual and analytical tools that complement and supplement the more traditional approaches. . . . ”
—Dr. J. Ted Blakley, New Testament Studies, University of St. Andrews

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

Previous blog posts in this series:

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Thematic Addition

Who knew you had to be an accountant in order to do Greek discourse analysis? Well, this week, Dr. Steve Runge takes you into the Accounting department here a Logos to illustrate Thematic Addition, another concept covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

After you grab your calculator, be sure to place your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Thematic Addition

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . This work offers a fresh and illuminating approach to the Greek New Testament and will make a superb addition to the more traditional Greek grammars.”
—Jody Barnard, Bangor University, UK

“. . . . If you what to understand Discourse Analysis and how it works then—read this first!”
—Alan Macgregor, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for the last video of the series: Segmentation

Previous blog posts in this series:

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Forward Pointing Reference

We hope you have been enjoying "The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis" video series, so we "have an offer for you." "Here’s the deal." "How about this?" Yes, you guessed it, today Dr. Steve Runge’s introduces us to Forward Pointing References, another item covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

Of course for a real deal, be sure to place your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Forward Pointing Reference

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . By creating an accessible discourse grammar that brings together the fruit of careful research, clarity, helpful examples, and practical insights, Dr. Runge has put countless teachers and students in his debt.”
—Dr. Constantine R. Campbell, Moore College, Sydney, AU

“. . . One need not agree with every suggested interpretation to benefit by becoming more sensitive to significant elements of the Greek language that are rarely given the attention they deserve.”
—Dr. Roy E. Ciampa, Associate Professor of New Testament, Chair, Biblical Studies Division, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Thematic Addition

Previous blog posts in this series:

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Changed Reference

As a reminder to place your Pre-Pub order for Dr. Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis, last Wednesday we started a short series of on-the-lighter-side, videos. This week, Steve helps illustrate another aspect of discourse analysis.

Today’s video: Changed Reference

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Logos has done the Greek student a wonderful favor by making this work available. It should not be missed. It is like no other grammar that is available today.”
—Dr. Samuel Lamerson, Associate Professor of New Testament, Knox Seminary

“. . . Runge has produced an invigorating work that will repay the attention of all those who are interested . . .”
—Mark Dubis, Associate Professor of Christian Studies, Union University

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Forward Pointing Reference

Previous blog post in this series:

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Thematic Highlighting

We are serious about Bible study, and we are serious about getting the church back into the study of Greek and Hebrew. But we have a lighter side, too. So, as a reminder to place your Pre-Pub order for Dr. Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis, we have a few, short, on-the-lighter-side, videos coming for you to enjoy and to help illustrate the Discourse Grammar‘s content.

Today’s video: Thematic Highlighting

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Runge’s work will become a required text in my Greek classes.”—Dr. Gerald Peterman, Professor of Bible and Chair of the Bible Department, Moody Bible Institute

“. . . . I commend his pioneering work for serious consideration by all New Testament students and scholars.”—Dr. William Varner, Professor of Greek Exegesis, The Masters College

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Changed Reference

Accessing the Original Languages Using Logos Discourse Resources

The Problem

Few would deny the importance of learning Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic for teaching and preaching. Despite this high view of the original languages, I’ve heard numerous pastors lament the limited practical payoff of investing seminary time and effort in learning languages. As language skills get rusty, it takes more and more effort to do the kind of passage analysis that the professor recommended. Language study can end up becoming more word study than passage study. This is not a new problem, and it is not going to go away anytime soon. However, I have made it my mission in life to see the receding tide of interest in original language study turned around. The big question is how to do it.

An Idea

While researching the problem, I found that Bible translators had applied modern linguistics to the study of biblical languages in incredibly useful ways. There was a problem, though. Their work was not applied to exegesis, and it was horribly technical. The result: few scholars in biblical studies saw any value in it. I tested out the ideas on students and was surprised with what I found. Yes, linguistics can be complex, and yes, it takes extensive training to be able to completely analyze a discourse. But—and this is a very important but—once students had a basic knowledge of the devices and saw where they occurred in a passage, they were in a much better position to understand the overall flow of the text. So besides just learning the concepts, people needed access to this very specialized data (more on the access issue here). My mission had gained a bit more focus.

A Solution

I spent the next five years writing my doctoral dissertation and brainstorming a new kind of database. Meanwhile, Logos moved their company headquarters from Oak Harbor, WA, to Bellingham, where I had been living since 1985. I showed them my ideas and waved my arms to describe what my idea would look like. They took a risk, and here’s what’s come about.

  • Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament: original language databases identifying the most exegetically significant discourse devices and providing a basic propositional breakdown to help you digest the syntax. If you have a basic knowledge of the language—even if it’s very rusty—then these resources will enhance your study.

There was a fairly common response to these resources: “Where has this stuff been? Why didn’t I learn this in school?”

The High Definition OT and NT provide most of the same Hebrew and Greek analysis, but they display it on the ESV text. These resources also come bundled with their original language counterparts.

  • Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: After the NT databases shipped, I was often asked how someone could better understand the devices and their relationship to traditional grammar and exegesis. We needed a grammar book designed for folks with a traditional background in Greek. The Discourse Grammar has been endorsed by leading scholars like Dr. Peter Gentry and Dr. Daniel Wallace, and it’s being used at leading seminaries like Southern Seminary, Dallas Seminary, and Knox Theological Seminary.

I made some rather unscholarly (goofy?) videos to demonstrate that discourse grammar is not brain surgery—it’s stuff we do every day.

  • Introducing Greek Discourse Grammar: Video Series: After receiving invitations from schools to come and teach a discourse grammar course, we decided to make a video series that provides an overview of the Discourse Grammar concepts using things like funny road signs and jokes to help you better understand how we use language and to show how this understanding can enhance your exegesis. Here are some samples from the series: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle: This bundle includes the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament: ESV Edition, Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament, and the High Definition Commentary: Philippians, along with a collection of essays from leading scholars in discourse studies dedicated to my mentor, Wycliffe translator Stephen Levinsohn. This bundled set saves you nearly $75 compared to buying the resources individually.

Turning the Tide

There is a belief that if you read long enough and widely enough in the original languages after leaving school, you will gain a deeper insight into Greek and Hebrew. While this may be true, the reality is that very few ever reach this level of competency. This is not a practical solution.

The growing suite of Logos discourse resources has been intentionally designed to give you the kind of insights that professors promised. And there are some new discourse projects in the works.

They say “all boats are lifted by a rising tide,” and this holds true for reinvigorating Greek and Hebrew study. Strengthening our exegetical skills will sharpen our understanding of Scripture and our ability to compellingly communicate its message. More effective preaching and teaching will ultimately strengthen the church. The Logos discourse resources represent a significant step forward. If you’ve already purchased some of the discourse resources and have recommendations for new users, be sure to post a comment about your experience.