Search Results for: Louis St. Hilaire

Get a Free Latin Dictionary

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager of our Electronic Text Development Department.

Logos really shines when it comes to the study of biblical Greek and Hebrew, but we’re building an impressive library of Latin texts as well, including the Vulgate, important  medieval and Reformation theology texts, and hundreds of Latin titles in the Perseus Classics Collection.

Now we’ve created a tool that makes all these texts easier to use in Logos. The Dictionary of Latin Forms allows you to look up hundreds of thousands of Latin word forms from the famous WORDS Latin-English Dictionary program. This means that you can instantly look up meanings for most words in these texts—not to mention Latin terms used in English texts—just by double-clicking or opening the Information window.

The best part is that you can add this powerful tool to your Logos library for free!

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You can also get a great price on Lewis & Short’s Latin Dictionary now on Community Pricing. The free Dictionary of Latin Forms is a handy study aid to get you quickly to a definition and lemma for a word, but Lewis & Short is an expansive dictionary that takes you in-depth with ample examples of usages from classical, Patristic and medieval texts. Even today, more than a hundred years after its publication, it is still consulted, particularly for  medieval and Ecclesiastical Latin.

These two resources will make it even easier to study Latin texts in Logos, so place your bid now to help put Lewis & Short’s Latin Dictionary into production.

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 2

SproulThis is the second half to last week’s Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1 by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Using Lectionary Resources in Logos Bible Software

Lectionary resources in Logos Bible Software are designed to make it easy to find the text for the day and to read it in the Bible translation of your choice.

The readings are arranged by calendar date and the book automatically opens at the next set of readings. For each Sunday or feast, the title, the season and the liturgical color is given. The text of the readings for the day is displayed in the translation you specify at the top of the panel, and links are provided that you can use to open your Bible or right-click to quickly open up Logos guides, tools and searches for deeper study and sermon preparation. (Click the images to see them full size.)

Lectionary Readings for the Day

For more general study, you can also find a complete listing of readings organized by liturgical event (i.e. more like a print lectionary that you can re-use year to year) in the “Index of Readings” found at the end of the lectionary.

The home page ribbon also gives you quick access to your lectionary. It displays the title and readings for the next Sunday and opens up your lectionary when you click.

To get your preferred lectionary to show up, prioritize it from Library.

In addition, the “Lectionaries” section of the Passage Guide allows you to quickly see where the passage you’re studying appears in your lectionaries. How and where a passage is used in a lectionary reveals important ways that your passage has been used in worship in connection with other passages or important feasts.

Passage Guide

To get this section to show up in your Passage Guide, click “Add” on the Passage Guide title bar and select “Lectionaries”.

Helps & Commentaries Geared Toward the Lectionary

Besides the lectionary resources mentioned in Part I, Logos also has several commentaries and sermon preparation helps that are specifically geared toward use with a lectionary:

Do you use a lectionary? Leave us a comment and let us know which one.

Patristic Commentaries on Pre-Pub

Today’s post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager of our Electronic Text Development department.

If you’re interested in the preaching and exegesis of the fathers of the church, there are three important collections available for pre-order that you should know about.

The Works of St. Cyril of Alexandria makes an excellent complement to the Early Church Fathers collection. Cyril was central to the Christological controversies of the fourth and fifth centuries and was well regarded in later centuries, but is oddly neglected in the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers. This collection closes the historical gap with letters and writings related to Cyril’s controversy with Nestorius, but, just as importantly, it includes Cyril’s massive commentaries on Luke and John.

Very few patristic commentaries on Luke have survived, so Cyril’s commentary on Luke is an important witness to the interpretation of this Gospel in the first millennium. Aside from a few sermons of Augustine, it will be the first from this era to be available for Logos.

John was much more commonly preached and commented on, so the Early Church Fathers already has commentary or homilies on John from Origen, Augustine and John Chrysostom. Adding Cyril’s commentary to this lets you see the development of the Alexandrian tradition of interpretation from Origen to Cyril, or compare, side by side, this tradition in Cyril with those of Antioch and the Latin West represented by Chrysostom and Augustine respectively.

Theodore of Mopsuestia’s Commentary on the Minor Pauline Epistles brings to Logos for the first time the writings of the man who was, in many ways, the mind opposite Cyril’s in the Christological controversies and theological and exegetical rivalry between Alexandria and Antioch. While it’s now acknowledged that the contrast between Alexandrian allegory and Antiochene literalism is not quite as sharp as was once thought, Theodore is perhaps the most typical and famous representative of the Antiochene tradition, and his comments onGalatians 4:21-31 contain an important polemic against the allegorists.

The Medieval Preaching and Spirituality Collection also includes writings of several later writers from the patristic era, including John Damascene, Boethius, and Gregory the Great. Important among these is Gregory the Great’s Morals on the Book of Job. The interpretation of the Old Testament was a pressing problem for the early church, as it engaged in controversies with Gnosticism, Judaism, and pagan critics. Gregory stands near the end of this era, as an heir to the exegetical methods pioneered and developed by men like Irenaeus, Origen, and Augustine, and his commentary on Job formed an important bridge from his own era to later centuries. It was incredibly influential in the Middle Ages, being cited hundreds of times in the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas.

If you’re interested in learning more about the biblical interpretation of the church fathers, take a look at Manlio Simonetti’s Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church or the Historical Interpreter’s Collection.

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1

Sproul

What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

The Second Vatican Council Documents Now Available on Pre-Pub

Vatican IIIt’s impossible to understand Catholicism today without reference to the Second Vatican Council, and—according to Pope Benedict XVI—it’s impossible to understand the Second Vatican Council without placing it in continuity with the entirety of the history and tradition of the Catholic Church.

The sixteen documents produced by the Council between 1962 and 1965 set forth a wide-ranging program of renewal that brought changes to nearly every aspect of the life of the Church. Some of these changes were dramatic and contested, and the resulting tumult has left many, like the Pope, regretting that Vatican II is too often viewed as a rupture with the past, in contradiction to the purpose of the Council Fathers.

Logos is pleased to announce the arrival of the Vatican II Documents to our Pre-Pub program. The Vatican II documents are a crucial addition to our growing library of Catholic products, and the Logos edition will be an excellent tool for establishing the kind of understanding of the Council that Pope Benedict calls for.

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Catena Aurea Is Shipping Soon!

Middle Ages
Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager on the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

We’ve discussed the Catena Aurea on the blog before, but before the special Pre-Pub price expires, I wanted to share how excited I am about its completion.

For those unfamiliar with it, the Catena Aurea is a commentary on the Gospels made up of quotations from Church Fathers and other commentators compiled by Thomas Aquinas. The English translation was edited by yet another great theological mind, John Henry Newman. An earlier post from Rosie Perera explains very well how great a resource this is, but I want to explain the benefits of the Logos edition in particular.

Aside from the basic advantages of a Logos edition—like higher accuracy in the capture of the text—there are a few specific things that we’ve done to make the Catena Aurea more usable than ever.

For one thing, print editions of the Catena Aurea have a very compact format, with patristic quotations strung together in long paragraphs and their sources only indicated by brief abbreviations and marginal notes.

In the Logos edition, we’ve added spacing to make the quotations easier to see. We’ve expanded, standardized (and, where necessary, disambiguated) the abbreviations for Church Fathers names to allow for easy identification of the source and consistent searching across the volumes. We’ve added pop-ups giving information from the front matter identifying who an author is and when he wrote, and we’ve moved marginal references into more precise locations in the body text.

Most of all, we’ve linked around 3,000 patristic references that are found in the Early Church Fathers, so that, in combination with that set (in either the Protestant or Catholic editions), you can instantly explore the broader context of many of the quotes. This makes it easy to use the Catena as a starting point for deeper study of the Church Fathers and, since the quotes in the Catena are often very brief and are occasionally condensed from longer passages, it can sometimes be particularly important for establishing the complete thought of the author.

With linking of Bible references, indexing by Bible verse, and integration as a commentary into your Passage Guide, this makes the Logos edition more powerful and easy to use than anything else available.

Even at full price of $139.99, the Logos edition of the Catena Aurea is a bargain, when you consider that you’re getting a richer, more powerful resource than comparably priced print sets, but until November 30, you can get it at the special Pre-Pub price. Don’t miss out!

What Happened Between Augustine and Martin Luther?

Middle Ages
Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager on the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.Popular views of the Middle Ages are often shaped more by Monty Python caricatures than by reality. Far from being a parenthesis in the progress of human learning and achievement that can be mostly ignored, the religious, political and philosophical developments of the medieval era are crucial for understanding the subsequent history of the West and the shape of the modern world. This is particularly true for the areas of church history and theology.

From Gregory VII to St. Francis to Jan Hus, the late Middle Ages were alive with movements to purify and reform society and the Church that presaged the changes of the Reformation era and left their mark on every form of Western Christianity. Meanwhile, the formation of the scholastic synthesis—and its eventual unraveling—are critical for understanding many Reformation-era controversies.

Logos offers some great resources for delving into the Christian thought of the medieval world, including the Summa Theologica and Summa Contra Gentiles of Thomas Aquinas, the major works of Anselm of Canterbury, a collection of writings of the Venerable Bede, and a Catholic Spirituality Collection that includes writings of Bernard of Clairvaux, Francis of Asissi and Thomas à Kempis.

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Who Is John Henry Newman, and Why Is He Important?

John Henry Newman

Today’s guest post is written by Louis St. Hilaire, the Catholic Product Manager at Logos Bible Software.

From his evangelical youth to his leadership of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement to his embrace of Roman Catholicism, the career and legacy of John Henry Newman is marked by brilliance and controversy.

His engagement with liberal, evangelical and catholic movements within the Church of England in his time makes him a pivotal figure, important for understanding the Anglican Communion today. Evangelical and Calvinist influences dominated his upbringing and adolescent religious awakening, but his studies of the Early Church led him to advocate—with the other leaders of the Oxford Movement—a return to the theological, ecclesiological and liturgical traditions of the first millennium as a necessary bulwark against liberalism. Many date the end of the Oxford Movement to Newman’s break with the Anglo-Catholics and reception into the Roman Catholic Church, but the work of the Movement remained influential and the conflicts of the nineteenth century are still visible in the High, Low and Broad Church tendencies within the Anglican Communion today.

Though his years as a Catholic were at times overshadowed by conflict and suspicion of his ideas from the hierarchy, he has become a favorite of modern popes, who, according Newman biographer Fr. Ian Ker, “look to him as a man who welcomed modernisation but in fidelity to Church authority and in continuity with the traditions of the Church”. It is widely expected that he will be beatified—the second to last step in being recognized as a saint—by Pope Benedict XVI in September of this year.

Claimed both by liberal Catholics for his insights into the nature of conscience and the development of doctrine, and claimed by conservative Catholics for his vigorous opposition to the liberal Christianity of his day, Newman is widely recognized as a forerunner of the Second Vatican Council and a profound influence on the direction of the modern Catholic Church.

We have put together a 31-volume collection titles written by Newman, available on Pre-Pub in the Collected Works of John Henry Newman (31 Vols.). This collection contains essays, lectures and sermons, spanning his Anglican and Catholic periods, dealing with history, theology, logic, apologetics and education. Right now, they’re on Pre-Pub for a steep discount. Head on over to the product page to learn more.

Here are some highlights from the collection:

  • An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine is Newman’s innovative and historically sensitive defense of Roman Catholic tradition. Written out of his own struggles between his abandonment of Anglicanism and reception into the Catholic Church, the Essay carves out a paradoxically modern traditionalism.
  • An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent is a philosophical defense of the assent of faith, a masterpiece of Christian personalism, illuminating the interior experience of reason and belief.
  • Apologia Pro Vita Sua is Newman’s defense of the development of his own thought against the accusations of Charles Kingsley. It has become a classic in the tradition of Christian autobiography begun by St. Augustine’s Confessions.
  • The Lectures on Justification, written in his Anglican period, carve out a via media on the question of justification, anticipating the rapprochement between Catholic and Protestant positions seen in the ecumenical dialogue of the 20th century.
  • Parochial and Plain Sermons is an 8-volume collection of sermons Newman delivered as an Anglican vicar at Oxford. Inspired by his study of the Church Fathers, they were deeply influential at Oxford and throughout England.

Head on over to the John Henry Newman page to learn more and check out the complete list of titles! You can also peruse the Catholic Product Guide for a wealth of resources written by Catholic authors on matters of doctrine, history, ecclesiology, and Christian spirituality.