Logos Tech Tip: What Did Peter Mean by ‘Sober-Minded’?

By Scott Gassoway

When studying a biblical text, you often encounter words that prompt questions about their original meaning. For example, in 1 Peter 5:7, Peter exhorts his readers to be “sober-minded.” This is not a common phrase in our culture. What did Peter mean by it?

The Bible Word Study guide provides a wealth of information about this word. When you open the Greek Word Study Layout, you get instant access to this information when you click the word. Are you studying a passage in the Old Testament? Start with the Hebrew Word Study Layout instead.

 

Note: When studying meaning, it’s always important to consider the context. The Bible Sense lexicon annotates word meanings according to their contexts: see “to get self-control ⇔ sober up” for other expressions of this same meaning of self-control described as getting sober.

Click here to open Logos to a Bible Word Study guide on νήφω or “sober-minded,” or watch the video below to see an example of how you can use the Bible Word Study guide to explore the word “believe.” 

Recommended resources:

Learn more about Layouts in Logos. Visit the Logos Help Center for more on how to get the most out of your Logos Bible Software.


Logos tech tip on how to do a bible word study

Comments

  1. the video above is about the word “Believe” not “sober-minded”! I guess I could do the same sort of study as outlined in the video but I doubt that I would be as quick in switching screens!

    • Adam Shaeffer says

      Thank you for the comment, Frederick. The video is intended as a demonstration of how to use the Bible Word Study Guide in Logos, and not as a walkthrough of what is described in the post. I’ve updated the wording of the post to make this more clear.

  2. Why would you use the word “believe” but blog about the word “sober-minded”?

    That don’t make sense!

    • Adam Shaeffer says

      Thank you for the comment, Jesus. The video is intended as a demonstration of how to use the Bible Word Study Guide in Logos, and not as a walkthrough of what is described in the post. I’ve updated the wording of the post to make this more clear.