The Greek Powerhouse Your Study Is Missing

Let’s talk about Greek, and what you need to master it—to gain fluency.

You must study. That means years of hard labor bent over grammars and ancient texts, speaking ancient Greek with strangers on Skype, even dreaming in Koine.

Sound like too much? Perhaps mastery at that level isn’t a priority, but exegesis is really important to you.

That’s a good thing, and here’s a tool that will help you take your exegesis to the next level.

The Brill Greek Reference Collection is a high-level academic powerhouse for anybody working in this language of the gods—in the philosophers, Josephus, or the New Testament.

Full of recent scholarly insights, this collection lets you: 

  • Bolster your studies with thorough, scholarly articles on Greek terms and history
  • Explore the latest research on the linguistic aspects of ancient Greek ranging from Proto-Greek to Koine
  • Analyze the etymology of the ancient Greek words in their earliest use

In short, it helps you know you’re handling the language with care, especially in your exegesis.  

This is a must-have research tool not only for every classicist but also for anyone interested in ancient Greek.

I highly recommend adding these elite resources to your digital research library so that you can mine their insights with a simple click. 

Possess the fully functional, fully searchable powerhouse in its best format: in your Logos digital research library.

 

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The Pre-Pub price of the Brill Greek Reference Collection is currently $499.99, compared to the retail digital price of $899.99 and the retail print price of $1,709.

I’ll let you do the math, but those are huge savings.

Take advantage, and help get this powerful collection published.

 

Tavis Bohlinger (PhD Candidate, Durham University) is the managing editor of the Logos Academic Blog and a student of Early Jewish and Pauline literature.

An earlier version of this post originally appeared on the Logos Academic Blog. 

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