Archives for March 2018

The Works of Kierkegaard Are Coming to Logos!

Father in heaven, when the thought of thee awakens in our soul, let it not waken as an agitated bird which flutters confusedly about, but as a child waking from sleep with a celestial smile.”

— Søren Kierkegaard

Kierkegaard, the nineteenth-century Danish philosopher and theologian, is a misunderstood titan among Christian writers. Born to a pious Lutheran family in Copenhagen, Kierkegaard was raised in affluence—reading literature, attending plays, and rubbing elbows with cultured elites. By his twenties, Kierkegaard was moving down the same path as others in the upper echelons of Danish society. He attended the School of Civic Virtue where he learned the humanities and continued on to study theology at the University of Copenhagen. Eventually, Kierkegaard would meet a young lady named Regine Olsen and become engaged. All seemed well for the young student.

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More Greek Word Studies from Logos

The response from last week’s video was so positive we’ve decided to send another Greek word study video your way. If you’re the type of Bible student that takes word studies to the next level, then this video is for you. In this week’s training, you will learn how to use two indispensable study tools, LSJ and TDNT. Together, these two resources will help you discover key references in Hellenistic literature and create an accurate historical sketch of how a term was used leading up to the time of the NT. Click the video to see how these tools work.

Recommended Resources:

What Was Jesus’ Tomb Really Like?

What would it have been like to step into the empty tomb on that first Easter morning?

This isn’t just idle speculation. When we take the time to understand the ancient culture and customs of the biblical world—when we reconstruct the world in which those stories took place—familiar biblical stories take on new life. And we can get a good sense of what that first Easter morning was like by exploring first-century tombs that are still around today.

We’ve put together a free, online, interactive experience that takes you inside a first-century tomb. Celebrated scholar Craig Evans is your tour guide in this fascinating glimpse at the biblical world. Follow him into the empty tomb, and renew your appreciation of the power of the Easter story.

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Good and Bad Goals for Studying New Testament Greek

You want to study New Testament Greek? I talked last week about good and bad motivations for the work. Now let’s get more practical and talk goals.

If you set unrealistic goals you’ll never arrive at them. You’ll get discouraged and give up, and you won’t want to try again. And if you set goals that are too low, you’ll be missing out on some Bible study riches.

So set the right goals. Let me suggest three goals you should not set, and three goals you should.
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Do Book Reviews Matter? Yes—to Most of Us.


Customer reviews. Whether we’re searching for a new cell phone or a good book to read on vacation, we all read the reviews before we buy. And in the case of Michael S. Heiser’s newest book, The Bible Unfiltered: Approaching Scripture on Its Own Terms, the comments are pretty tough to ignore.

One reviewer wrote, “Reading something by Michael Heiser is like having someone walk quietly into the room and tune in a radio that has been deafening you to distraction with static and interference.”
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The Meaning of Multiple Rings in a Bible Word Study


I recently received the following scenario from a Logos user:

I’m studying a Greek word that is translated “walk” as in Ephesians 4:1. When I generate a Bible Word Study report for the Greek lemma I see all the ways the lemma is translated in my Bible. When I rest the cursor on one of the translations I see another ring. What’s the significance of this second ring?

Again another great question from a fellow Logos user. Let’s go through this scenario and we’ll discover what she’s referring to:
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Vote for Your Favorites, Save on Someone Else’s


Logos March Madness is in the final round. Save 55% on resources eliminated in round 5—or more, with dynamic pricing—then go vote for your champions. It’s a battle between Old and New Testament exegesis in the courses final, and between exegesis and exposition in the commentaries final.

Check out the eliminated resources below—all 55% off.

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The Organized Mind of John Stott

For almost sixty years of his fruitful career as pastor, writer, and evangelical leader, John Stott used a system of note cards to keep track of quotations and stories that he wanted to use in his sermons and books. With the help of his faithful secretary Frances Whitehead, he filed these cards away in his office at All Souls Langham Place, the church in London where he pastored for many years. Here is one of those note cards, with the topic heading “Agnosticism” in the lower right corner:
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Get the Best Price on Bible Teaching Outlines


The Teacher’s Outline and Study Bible is a fantastic resource for teaching Bible studies, small groups, or Sunday school classes. And it’s now on Pre-Pub. The price will go up when it launches, so now’s the time to get it at a good price.
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3 Rules for Using Commentaries (Bonus: 100+ Are on Sale Now)

“There’s no way to know it without discovery.” — Sara Groves, songwriter

Groves isn’t talking about commentaries when she sings that line, but she’s describing a fundamental truth about deep knowledge: it only comes by discovery. And discovery cannot be rushed.

Ideally, anyone digging into a biblical text wants to understand what God is revealing about Himself. The truths will be big, so they must be studied slowly and from every angle.

Here’s how to use commentaries as tools for discovery, rather than shortcuts to answers. [Read more…]