The Definitive Top 10 Volumes from NICOT/NICNT

Social_1200x628_620x324Right now, select volumes from the New International Commentary Series on the Old and New Testaments are on sale—and you can get up to 20 of any of those volumes for just $20 each with the coupon code NICSALE. That’s guaranteed savings of 35–72%!

You can get any 20, but how will you choose?

Here are the top 10 volumes you don’t want to miss, according to bestcommentaries.com.

1. The Book of Genesis, Chapters 1–17 by Victor P. Hamilton

The second-highest-rated commentary on Genesis available, Victor P. Hamilton’s commentary offers a substantive introduction and extensive background on the ancient Near East, as well as commentary on the first 17 chapters of Genesis. But it is Hamilton’s introduction—which serves both this volume and the one covering chapters 18–50—that makes this volume so valuable, with its in depth discussions on the structure of Genesis, its composition, its theology, the problems involved in its interpretation, its canonicity, and the Hebrew text itself. Get NICOT: Genesis 1–17 now.

2. The Book of Genesis, Chapters 18–50 by Victor P. Hamilton

Genesis is such a rich, dense, and important book that Hamilton was obliged to cover it in two volumes.Hamilton’s treatment of Genesis in both volumes emphasizes where and and how the New Testament references and appropriates sections of Genesis. Hamilton also presents a unified vision of Genesis, stressing the main theme running throughout: God’s gracious promise of blessing and reconciliation in the face of evil and sin. Get NICOT: Genesis 18–50 now.

3. The Book of Ecclesiastes by Tremper Longman III

Ecclesiastes is one of the most fascinating books of the Old Testament, and Longman’s exhaustive volume on this book is the highest-rated commentary available. Longman’s approach is unique: not only does he challenge the long-held belief that Solomon wrote Ecclesiastes, he also argues that reading the book as a narrative in three parts is essential for understanding it’s meaning. Get NICOT: Ecclesiastes now.

4. The Book of Proverbs, Chapters 1–15 by Bruce K. Waltke

Waltke’s number-one-rated commentary is a powerhouse of insight. Over 25 years in the making, Waltke’s commentary explains and elucidates Proverbs as “theological literature,” and addresses such issues as text and versions, structure, authorship, and theology. A study of Proverbs is incomplete without this volume. Get NICOT: Proverbs 1–15 now.

5. The Book of Proverbs, Chapters 15–31 by Bruce K. Waltke

Packed with just as much insight and literary criticism as its companion, this commentary demonstrates the profound, ongoing relevance of this Old Testament book for Christian faith and life. Moreover, you’ll get world-class scholarship in Waltke’s highly readable style—accessible to teachers, pastors, Bible students, and general readers alike. Get NICOT: Proverbs 15–31 now.

6. The Gospel of Luke by Joel B. Green

This highly original commentary on the Gospel of Luke explains first-century culture in the Roman world while presenting the text of Luke as a holistic, historical narrative. Author Joel B. Green demonstrates how Luke’s writing called his readers to continued faithfulness and witness in God’s salvific project. Get NICNT: Luke now.

7. The Book of the Acts by F.F. Bruce

Few commentaries are as highly regarded as F.F. Bruce’s The Book of Acts. First published in 1954, Bruce’s volume has stood for more than 50 years as a standard commentary on Acts. This fully revised version, based on Bruce’s own fresh translation of the Greek text, makes transparent the walls between the first and the twentieth centuries and enables you to hear not only the voice of Luke but the Word of God. Get NICNT: Acts now.

8. The Epistle to the Romans by Douglas J. Moo

In this, the highest ranked commentary on Romans—Douglas J. Moo provides a superb study of Paul’s letter to the Romans and restates its enduring message for Christians today. Get scholarly insight into issues concerning Paul’s teaching such as Jewish law, the relationship of Jews and Gentiles, and of course the New Perspective on Paul. Get NICNT: Romans now.

9. The First Epistle to the Corinthians by Gordon D. Fee

This award-winning commentary on 1 Corinthians by Gordon D. Fee has been lauded as the best study available on 1 Corinthians. Fee’s approach to 1 Corinthians is tri-fold: you’ll get a wealth of historical and literary context to orient you, detailed discussion of every exegetically significant variant, and practical application. Get NICNT: 1 Corinthians now.

10. The Book of Revelation by Robert H. Mounce

In this volume from the NICNT, Robert H.Mounce addresses the difficult and complex questions surrounding the Book of Revelation in a style that’s accessible to pastors, students, and general readers. Mounce’s commentary on Revelation is widely praised as one of the best and is considered by many as the standard of scholarship on Revelation.Get NICNT: Revelation now.

There you have it—the definitive top 10 best volumes from the New International Commentary on the Old and New Testaments, according to bestcommentaries.com. You can pick and choose from among them, or get all top-10 in one fell swoop and equip yourself with some of the best modern scholarship available.

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Shop the NICOT/NICNT sale and get up to 20 volumes for $20 each. This deal disappears July 5—shop today!

 

 

Comments

  1. I would construct the top ten list a bit differently.

    I would include Waltke on Proverbs, Moo on Romans, and Fee on 1 Corinthians (is it the updated Fee that is being sold?). These are all the best or among the best commentaries on these books of the Bible.

    But I would also include Oswalt on Isaiah, Block on Ezekiel and Fee on Philippians. These also are the best or among the best commentaries on these books of the Bible (and ranked, first, first, second, respectively on bestcommentaries.com).
    I’d also include Robertson on Nahum, Haggai, Zephaniah. This is an excellent theologically oriented commentary. It’s a bit different in approach from others in NICOT, but excellent.

    Hamilton on Genesis is fine, but I would get Mathews in the New American set and Wenham in Word Biblical, and perhaps even McKeown or Waltke before Hamilton.
    I would positively avoid getting Longman on Ecclesiastes. I find it unconvincing that most of Ecclesiastes is written from an unbiblical point of view with an epilogue added by a later editor. I’d recommend Bartholomew in the Baker Commentary on Psalms and Wisdom books and Fredericks in the Apollos OT Commentary for Ecclesiastes.
    Green does give a good narrative commentary on Luke, but I’d still give pride of place to Bock in the BECNT.
    Bruce is fine on Acts, but I don’t think I’d put him in first rank any longer. Keener, Petersen PNTC, and Schnabel ZECNT would likely come first.
    On Revelation, Osborne BECNT for a premillennial perspective, Thomas for a traditional dispensational perspective, Beale, NIGTC for an amillennial perspective (sorry to leave postmills out) would be preferred over Mounce.

  2. I’m afraid the author lost credibility by not including Block (Ezekiel). Some critics have called that two-volume set the best bible book commentary of all time.

    I agree with a previous post to avoid Longman on Ecclesiastes. And I also agree there are several better volumes in other sets on Genesis.