How to Grasp the Flow of Thought in a Passage

LogosPro_blogThere are few things more frustrating than hearing Bible verses taken out of context, especially if you consider yourself a serious student of the Bible. You know what I’m talking about—some well-meaning Christian quotes a verse. He’s uncovered a spiritual truth that perfectly addresses a personal challenge. The only problem? He’s completely ignored the surrounding context! The New Testament wasn’t written in isolated, versified chunks of unrelated texts. Each verse flows from a greater context. When we ignore the logical flow of a biblical passage or book, we risk misinterpretation. Understanding the flow of thought of a biblical passage is essential to good hermeneutics and sound application of biblical principles.

You can use Logos to trace the logical flow of of a biblical author’s thought and expose the underlying structure of a passage or book. Open a biblical text you want to study and choose the Propositional Outline visual filter from the resource toolbar. You’ll see the text transform so you can explore the flow of the passage, see how ideas fit together, and learn how each line relates to the next. Each line is defined with an easy-to-understand label, along with definitions for each one. Here’s how it’s done.

Available in Logos 6 Silver and above

Study the Bible in context

  • Logos Now: You don’t have to wait for the next major Logos release to access new datasets, features, media, and interactives. With a monthly or yearly subscription to Logos Now, you can get our latest tools  as we create them. That includes the Old Testament propositional bible outlines. With this dataset, you can study the logical flow of Old Testament books using the same methods you saw in the video.
  • Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle: To really understand the flow of thought of a biblical passage, you need to dig into the original languages. This bundle of resources from Logos scholar-in-residence Steve Runge answers the question, “How would our understanding of the Greek text change if we read it for what it is—as Greek?”
  • Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible Bundle: Applying the same approach as it’s New-Testament counterpart, this bundle will help you understand how the unique features of the Hebrew language contribute to proper interpretation.

There’s plenty more where that came from . . .

The Logos Pro Team is here to help you master Logos Bible Software. Our team of experts want to educate and empower you with the best Bible software so that you can do better Bible Study. That’s why we’re creating FREE training videos that teach you how to use Logos tools and resources. We’ve already created loads of videos, and are crafting more every day. Plus, our team carefully selects a real example to help demonstrate the power of Logos in each video. So not only will you learn the software better, you’ll know the Bible better too.

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Comments

  1. Hamilton Ramos says:

    God bless:

    I am a little surprised by what is written in this article. It would seem as if it says that elucidation of absolute truth comes from a particular team of Scholars imposing a structure in the Scripture.

    I am pretty sure that if you were to select another group of Scholars (fully versed in original languages), but of a different tradition, the underlying structure resulting from their work would be different.

    If someone thinks that the presuppositions, previous understandings, assumptions that one brings, do not get in the way and can be controlled so that objective, impartial study can be obtained, may not be fully in conformance with reality.

    Looking at the visual filter that you mention, and taking a look at Acts2:38, for some strange reason, people that imposed this propositional outline in the Scripture categorized “in the name of Jesus Christ” as “d Basis (c)”. when is clear even to non experts like me that “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ” is ONE COMMAND consisting of two different actions.

    Statements like this in the article:
    “You can use Logos to trace the logical flow of of a biblical author’s thought and expose the underlying structure of a passage or book. Open a biblical text you want to study and choose the Propositional Outline visual filter from the resource toolbar. You’ll see the text transform so you can explore the flow of the passage, see how ideas fit together, and learn how each line relates to the next.”

    seem to me as false marketing, as the people that produced the structure has no 100% way to know exactly the author’s thoughts, because if they had, they would see that the phrase in Acts 2:38 (as explained above) is one command requiring two distinct actions, and not a command, followed by a mandate, that then has a Basis.

    This is my non-expert opinion of course.

    Blessings.

  2. Propositional Outlines
    In 1Peter 3:1-3, can anyone explain to me why the participle in 1.c is tagged as a Command (“The speaker is ordering his audience to perform some action” while 3.a is tagged as a Mandate (“The speaker is placing obligations on, promising, or warning a third party; the obligation expects performance of what is stated”)?
    What is the difference between a command and a mandate in this context? It seems to be me that while 3.a is a 3rd person imperative, it functions as a command concerning the women’s adornment.

    • I’m told by the progenitor of this terminology that “Mandate” is basically a command in the third person. Same thing goes for exhortation, except the form is first person. Command seemed to be for anything that was second person (or other than first or third person).