What is Logos Reformed?

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Wouldn’t it be great to have all the power of Logos paired with a library of trusted resources that reflect your convictions and the standards of your theological tradition? That’s the idea behind Logos Reformed. The Reformed base packages are packed with great resources from the Reformed tradition.

 
 
 
 
 

Classics of the Reformation: old and new

The Reformed tradition has a rich theological history, and Logos Reformed contains works from the very beginning, such as Calvin’s Institutes and Commentaries. You’ll also find important modern works like Muller’s Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics. You’ll get Warfield, Vos, Boston, Owen, Bavinck, and Edwards, too! Plus much, much more.

The best of Logos 6, plus a library chosen for you

If you are Reformed, this product is designed for you. The powerful tools and features of Logos 6 like Atlas, Factbook, Timeline, Passage Guide (and many more!) work the same as in any base package—but Logos Reformed includes a library chosen to reflect the interests and convictions of the Reformed tradition. The Logos 6 Reformed base packages are the only products of their kind, anywhere. You can’t find  the specialized library of Reformed and Presbyterian theologians, commentators paired with the powerful features of Logos anywhere else.

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Discover which Reformed base package is right for you.

 

Comments

  1. "…a library of trusted resources that reflect your convictions, and the standards of your theological tradition…" I just attempted to send off a tweet concerning this publication, but am unsure of whether or not I was successful. So here is my comment on this base package. I have no doubt that it is an excellent product, I have not yet been disappointed by Logos; but I have a concern. Though I am not of the reformed tradition, I enjoy the works of many of the Scholars from this tradition. I once upon a time regularly read their journal (PRTJ). But as I noted above I have a concern, which is this – Is this an unwitting attempt at the promotion of division in the Body of Christ? Or, is this purely a business decision?

  2. I personally think that it's a business decision. As the Body of Christ is already divided amongst reformed, baptist, etc. camps. Logos seems to just be making a more affordable option for those of varying theological leanings to have more resources that they would enjoy. Because if you want reformed resources and you wanted a base package, without a reformed base packed you'd have to spend the money on a base package and then much more building up your reformed resources.
    While some could see it as "an unwitting attempt at the promotion of division in the Body of Christ," we must remember that Faithlife and Logos Bible Software are a business.

  3. ..would love to see less “Reformed” bias at Logos, or at least it appears that way to me in some ways. If you are going to say, “trusted resources that reflect your convictions” than the varied belief alternate should be available, no? ex. if you present “Reformed” should you not also present a “Wesleyan” base package or something up that alley. Are not the Wesleyan writers grouped with Pentecostal in large at Logos? Maybe I’m reading this wrong. I would not present a Wesleyan as a Pentecostal personally. That’s my one beef with Logos, it seems to push in the direction of “Reformed” interest, you can just kinda smell it. I’ve just noticed that in the little things, like John MacArthur as the landing page endorsement (at least he was when I wrote this) and lack of books with Wesleyan thought promoted. I would consider MacArthur as almost, if not, hostile toward Wesleyan thought. To give credit, major kudos on The Lewis collection!!! ..not to mention Finney, Chambers, Tozer etc.., it’s in there. And I quite love my Logos software, so not a slam on Logos just thought I would mention. Maybe I’m ultra-sensitive to the subject because those of the Reformed persuasion, that I have come to know, and that are aware of it, seem quite intolerant of opposing perspectives.

  4. I believe its the promotion of the division in the Body of Christ? 5 years ago we hired a Pastor not knowing that he was a reformed pastor at the time. It took him over a year to split the church with his Reformed Theology. It was the teaching of the elect that I had a hard time with. That certain people was predestined/chosen for heaven.

  5. It is rather sad to read some of the comments about the decision to offer Logos Reformed. The statements indicate a lack of understanding about who God is. It may be suggested that there are several "watershed doctrines which divide so-called evangelicals. Certainly, when it comes to salvation, one of these doctrines is sovereign grace, and the other a mixture of "God's part" and "man's part." Obviously, both views cannot be correct. At the risk of sounding intolerant, we must hold to a God who is not only sovereign in creating and sustaining the universe, but who is sovereign over every aspect of salvation, or we are left with a God who is dependent on man's free will and the choices he makes. Scripture clearly demonstrates Christ's words teach us that His death and resurrection secure for us, not the possibility of salvation the gospel offers, but salvation itself.

  6. It is rather sad to read some of the comments about the decision to offer Logos Reformed. The statements indicate a lack of understanding about who God is. It may be suggested that there are several "watershed doctrines which divide so-called evangelicals. Certainly, when it comes to salvation, one of these doctrines is sovereign grace, and the other a mixture of "God's part" and "man's part." Obviously, both views cannot be correct. At the risk of sounding intolerant, we must hold to a God who is not only sovereign in creating and sustaining the universe, but who is sovereign over every aspect of salvation, or we are left with a God who is dependent on man's free will and the choices he makes. Scripture clearly demonstrates Christ's words teach us that His death and resurrection secure for us, not the possibility of salvation the gospel offers, but salvation itself.