Logos 6: Display Parallel Passages from the Gospels

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I remember years ago preparing a sermon on Jesus’ Gethsemane prayer. During my study, I discovered that all four Gospel writers spoke of this event.

Since at the time I didn’t own a harmony of the Gospels (a book presenting in parallel columns the same event from various gospels) here’s what I did. I started off turning the pages in my Bible back and forth from Matthew to Mark to Luke to John and then back to Matthew. After a few paper cuts, I devised a better plan. I photocopied the Gethsemane verses from each Gospel and taped them together side by side. I made my own harmony!

That homemade harmony severed its purpose for that message, but thankfully today in Logos 6 there’s a much improved method—the Parallel Gospel Reader.

Here’s one way to use it:

  • Select the tools menu (A)
  • Click All interactive resources (B)

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  • Click Parallel Gospel Reader (this interactive resource is only available in Logos 6 Gold and higher) (C)

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  • Select a Bible, such as the English Standard Version, from the drop-down list (this Bible will be used to display the verses) (D)
  • Select a harmony from the drop-down list, such as A Harmony of the Gospels by A.T. Robertson (E)
  • Notice the table of contents displaying events in the life of Jesus (F)

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  • Jump to the Gethsemane prayer using either of these methods:
    • Scroll to section 152 (G), or
    • Type a reference from the event, such as John 18:1, in the reference box (H) and press the Enter key

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  • Click the section title to display the verses (I)
  • Notice the accounts of the same event from different Gospel writers

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I encourage you to carefully read the various accounts of Jesus’ prayer in the garden several times. As you do, you’ll see that Matthew, Mark, and Luke each present different details about the agonizing prayer. Matthew uses words like troubledvery sorrowful even unto death, and fell on his face. Mark adds greatly distressed and Abba. Luke writes knelt down, angel from heaven strengthening him, and his sweat became like great drops of blood. All three refer to this cup.

By comparing and contrasting these various accounts, you’ll discover this agonizing prayer was not a brief, easy time of reelection as is often portrayed; this was a spiritual wrestling match!

So as you’re studying the Gospels, forget the paper and tape, but don’t forget this helpful interactive resource that quickly displays parallel passages from various harmonies of the Gospels.

For more detailed information about working with interactive resources, as well as the rest of Logos 6’s new tools, check out these new Logos 6 training materials:

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Columbus, Georgia (Atlanta area).

Comments

  1. Emmanuel Ukaegbu-Onuoha says:

    when are you going to have logos live training event in southern California? I would like to pursue a logos training certification program. Is it open to interested candidates? And what should I do?
    Thank you for your attention.
    Emmanuel

  2. As a "Logos 6 Portfolio" Logos customer I believe the 'manual' should be part of it. Every time I bought a new product, e.g. a vehicle, it comes with a free manual. I believe that as a Christian firm (Logos) it ought to do likewise to every Logos customer especially those who had and have spent a lot buying Logos resources. I have spent more than $15,000.00 already in ordering Logos resources and I wish that Logos could consider letting me have the 'manual' as a gift; and would prefer a digital one.

  3. Terry Voss says:

    I think anyone who purchases it should get manual

  4. Arnel Manalo says:

    I share the same sentiment as Lomani, it’s a sound principle that Logos should consider. I bought the first manual the first time i purchase Logos, the second upgrade i felt like that there’s something amiss or doesn’t sit right when i see the offer to BUY the manual. It’s happening again with this offer to buy the manual with LOGOS 6.

  5. Ralph Bock says:

    What is the response from Logos? It seems that Logos is ignoring his customers by not answering them.
    Not every one of us can fly to attend these courses to use the Logos program to its full right. A digital free manual is the right thing to do. Come on Logos!!

  6. David Hughes says:

    wow..Morris Proctor…the use of the “parallel gospel reader” is something that is going to be really beneficial for me and makes parallel readings way easy! Thanks for the explanation of its usage. :)

  7. I couldn't agree more… I think the training manual and videos should be included in every base package. It is really ridiculous that they charge extra for a digital user-guide

  8. Dear fellow users of Logos,

    As someone with some experience in these areas, I feel compelled to share the following:

    Manuals are no easy task, and the time and effort to produce one – especially a good one – are considerable.

    Because it is true that we are accustomed to receiving a manual with many of the products that we buy, it follows that those companies which do include “free” manuals are actually including the real costs of producing and maintaining that manual in the price of their product.

    A different approach is to decouple the cost of the manual from the cost of the product by making the two available separately, This lowers the up front cost of the product and has the added virtue of not forcing every purchaser of the product to also purchase a manual that they may not desire and may never read. (I’m a guy – what’s a manual? ;-) )

    Granted, this approach is not the norm. But it is no less valid an approach.

    Perhaps we will hear from Logos on this (perhaps they have already addressed this topic elsewhere?), but until we do, I would gently counsel that we refrain from jumping to conclusions that are based on our experience with other types of products, and instead guard our hearts on this topic.

    How unfortunate would it be for us to be so heavily invested in researching the Christian Word and to simultaneously allow ourselves to grumble about those who have made available to us this means of accessing it?

    Hope this has been helpful to some.