Cultivate a Big-Picture View of Scripture: This App Makes It Easier

every-day-bible-appThe Bible is a big book. Many people read it faithfully every day for years, and still never develop a big-picture view of it.

For example:

  • How does the story of the Exodus foreshadow the earthly ministry of Jesus?
  • Why would God direct the prophet Hosea to marry a prostitute?

The reading plan and devotional built into the Every Day Bible app make answers to these and other difficult questions more accessible. Pairing Old and New Testament passages with a selection of biblical poetry each day, Every Day Bible invites you to develop a big-picture view of scripture, discovering connections between passages that you may not have noticed before.

And it’s not too late to jump into a year-long journey through scripture with Every Day Bible. You can start today at EveryDayBible.com, or—if you prefer—by downloading the Every Day Bible app for your Android or iOS device. The app is brilliantly simple—when you fire it up each day, you’ll jump right into the text with nothing new to learn or figure out.

So if this is your year to cultivate a big-picture view of scripture, the Every Day Bible app is ready to help.

Get this exceptional app—designed by the same team that brought you Logos 6—for free right now!

Comments

  1. Once again no support for Windows Phone something we have come to expect from these people

    • Scot Tomilnson says:

      Peter,
      Maybe your post isn’t as harsh as it sounds to me but I am continually surprised (disappointed?) by Logos users who post incredibly negative comments. Faithlife does an incredible job of providing products. They are not perfect people or a perfect company but they really do, in my opinion, an incredible job of providing previously unforeseen access to the Word of God and thousands of titles related to the Bible and the Church.

      It is not unreasonable for Faithlife’s development efforts to not support the Windows phone. According to Redmond Magazine (12/2/14) the Windows phone market share is expected to be about 2.7% (http://redmondmag.com/articles/2014/12/02/windows-phone-market-declined.aspx). It would not be a wise resource utilization decision to spend development time on a platform that is less than a tiny sliver of the mobile market.