Archive - September, 2011

Logos 4: Hyperlink Unrecognizable Bible References

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsAs you probably know, contained within the recent release of Logos  4.3 is the Personal Books tool, which allows you to convert your .docx files into Logos resources. Our team here at MP Seminars has posted numerous QuickClip videos to help you get started in building your books. I also wanted to provide written instructions in this blog.

If your .docx file contains recognizable Bible references, Logos will  automatically hyperlink them when it builds your personal book.

For example, if the following sentence is in your document, Logos will automatically hyperlink John 3:16:

The most famous verse in all of Scripture is John 3:16.

Since John 3:16 is recognizable as a Bible reference, Logos does all the work to hyperlink it. Here are other examples of recognizable Bible references:

  • John 3
  • Jn 3:16
  • John 3:12-17

If however, your document contains the following sentence, Logos will not automatically hyperlink the verse:

Look at verse 16, the most famous verse in the Bible, which says, For God so loved the world.

Nowhere in the sentence do we find a recognizable Bible reference. Logos does not know which verse 16 we are referring to. Nor does Logos recognize which verse contains, “For God so loved the world.”

So to hyperlink unrecognizable Bible references, we have to add special tagging to the text in the .docx file. Here is what the tagged text should look like:

Look at [[verse 16 >> John 3:16]], the most famous verse in  the Bible, which says, [[For God so loved the world >> John  3:16]].

To hyperlink verse 16 to John 3:16, place double square brackets to the left of the text. After the text, insert a space followed by two greater than signs, then insert the Bible reference you are wanting to link to. Then close with two double square brackets.

Only the text to the left of the greater than signs (verse 16) will  appear in the Personal Book when Logos builds it; that text, however, will be hyperlinked to John 3:16.

At first this may seem tedious, but after using the tag a few times, you will be able to hyperlink any text you want very quickly.

If John 3:16 is the most famous verse, which would you say are the second or third most famous verses? Leave a comment letting us know!

Weekly Roundup: September 03

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of September 03, 2011.

Key Item

Get the entire New International Commentary for $999.95! Enter coupon code BACKTOSCHOOL at checkout to see the special price. Hurry—sale ends September 12, 2011!

Logos Talk

Interesting Discussions

Logos Forum

Logos Facebook Page

Products

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to get these at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

New to Community Pricing: Classic Commentaries and Studies on Galatians (24 vols.)

Part of the growing number of collections of Classic Commentaries and Studies available in Community Pricing:

Bid today and save a bundle before these collections cross over the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newer postings on our Careers page:

Customer Service

Marketing Department

Publications

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

What You Could Be Missing: See NICOT/NT in Logos for Yourself!

You still have a little more time to get the 40-volume New International Commentary at a discount. But don’t wait—the Back-to-School Sale ends soon. Enter coupon code BACKTOSCHOOL at checkout to see the special price. Download it now!

Gary Thomas Discusses The Glorious Pursuit

“For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers.”—Romans 8:29 (ESV)

This has been a favorite verse of mine for years. I have always loved the idea of being molded and formed into the image and character of Christ. But the inherent challenge here is in making sure we are not frustrating this work while doing what we can to be pliable.

Gary Thomas has been a mentor to me for some time in this area. His writings have instilled in me an insatiable desire to not only focus on building the character of Christ within me, but to understand how Christians have practiced spiritual formation in the past.

When I saw that Logos was carrying Thomas’ The Glorious Pursuit: Embracing the Virtues of Christ, I jumped at an opportunity to ask him some questions about this fantastic book on Christian virtues.

Logos: It has been a while since you penned The Glorious Pursuit. What do you remember about the process?

Thomas: I was approached by NavPress to write a book for a series they were doing on forgotten or neglected ancient spiritual practices. Practicing the virtues was a mainstay for many centuries of church history, and we felt it would be equally helpful and relevant for Christians to reclaim this practice today. So much of contemporary Christian teaching focuses on “not sinning.” I was eager to write a book focusing on something positive—what we can become. Instead of obsessing over becoming “unlike the devil” I believe Scripture calls us to focus on becoming like Christ.

Logos: You discuss 14 classical virtues (humility, surrender, detachment, love, chastity, generosity, vigilance, patience, discernment, thankfulness, gentleness, fortitude, obedience, and penitence), which of those did you find was the most challenging to write about?

Thomas: There’s a reason I had to use two chapters to fully cover humility. It’s been called the “queen of the virtues” and rightly so. It’s the hardest one to live out, in many ways, and yet the foundation for so much that follows (along with love, of course).

Another particularly challenging one was detachment, since that’s such a foreign concept to contemporary believers. We just don’t think in those terms, yet doing so can be revolutionary in a believer’s life.

Logos: One online reviewer said of The Glorious Pursuit, “This is one of the best and most helpful books I’ve ever read.” Do you often hear from people whose lives have been touched by your work?

Thomas: Just about every day, in all honesty. It’s humbling, knowing how little I know, and knowing how messed up I can be, and yet seeing how God can play some great music through rather dented instruments.

Logos: One of the endorsements for the Glorious Pursuit was by J. I. Packer. If I remember correctly, Packer also endorses your book Seeking the Face of God. Do you consider Packer a mentor?

Thomas: Absolutely. He was my thesis advisor, and small group advisor during one year at Regent College, so I got to spend some time with him, including in his home. I admire Dr. Packer’s courage, fidelity to Scripture, and passion for the Gospel. Even in his later years, he is passionate about seeing God’s church move forward. Time with him (I got to visit with him again about 2 years ago when I was up in Canada) is always tremendously inspiring for me.

At a theological level, I especially appreciate Packer’s ability as a “fair” critic. When he challenges another tradition with which he has disagreements, he’ll point out its strengths and what the church at large can learn from it, and then gently but brilliantly expose the flaws (or at least problematic tendencies). I’ve tried to emulate that approach, drawing on the strengths of a wide range of traditions without rejecting them in total, while still staying true to a rather conservative theological (and I think biblical) perspective.

Logos: In what ways have you heard about The Glorious Pursuit being used in group settings?

Thomas: It’s been used by weight loss groups, prison chaplains, men’s groups, and women’s Bible studies. What I hear back from these participants is that they appreciate the positive focus—looking at what we can become, rather than obsessing over what we should avoid.

Logos: What would you say to someone who has picked up a copy of The Glorious Pursuit and is starting their journey toward practicing Christian virtues?

Thomas: Take the chapter on gentleness to heart, and be gentle with yourself. This is a lifelong journey. The more I understand about the physiology of our brain, the more brilliant I believe this ancient practice is. It takes time to create new neurological grooves and therefore moral habits. We have to consciously choose our focus, put it into practice, and wait until it becomes sort of like second nature, though in this case, it’s a supernaturally empowered redeemed nature.

The Glorious Pursuit is not only a fantastic personal resource, it is valuable for discipleship and small groups as well. I can personally attest to using this book in a variety of settings and its rich content always helps foster deep, engaging, and transparent discussion.

Order a copy of The Glorious Pursuit today and get it while it’s still on Pre-Pub!

For more information about Gary Thomas, visit GaryThomas.com or follow him on Twitter.

Have you read The Glorious Pursuit? Leave us a comment and tell us what you thought.

Work for Logos and Get Romans Road, Rocky Road, and Black Raspberry Chip!

Finally a job where you can indulge your love for the Bible and ice cream all in one place!

For four generations Graeter’s has been creating some of the world’s most irresistible ice cream. Recently, the employees of Logos got to experience this irresistible ice cream first hand.

It all started when Proclaim product manager, Matt Peterson, found Graeter’s for sale at a grocery store in Bellingham, WA. Being a recent transplant from Cincinnati, OH, Matt was surprised to see his favorite ice cream being sold locally.

Excited to share this hometown delicacy, Matt picked up a couple of pints and brought them to work for the marketing department. We loved it!

Soon Matt was on the phone with Graeter’s to see if they had any coupons he could hand out to other co-workers at Logos. What was Graeter’s response? “We’ll do you one better, we’ll send you enough Graeter’s Ice Cream to allow everyone to have some.”

A couple of days later, Logos received gallons of  dense, creamy ice cream perfectly wrapped in dry ice. Each employee got to enjoy a double scoop of Graeter’s famous Black Raspberry Chip—what a treat! This is just another reason that Logos is such a wonderful place to work.

To stay up-to-date on the latest Graeter’s news or to find where their ice cream is carried locally, follow Graeter’s on Facebook. You can also get their latest updates via Twitter!

If you are interested in a job with a company that takes both cutting edge biblical technology and ice cream seriously, make sure to check out our career page.

Lastly, the marketing team at Logos loves to forge new relationships and do fun and exciting things for their employees. If your company has some ideas for working together with Logos, send us an email at:

We look forward to hearing from you!

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