Archive - July, 2011

Honoring Stephen H. Levinsohn

Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. LevinsohnThis past week, Steven Runge has been at the SBL international meeting in London. Among the scholars he’s been interacting with is Stephen H. Levinsohn, a linguist affiliated with the Summer Institute of Linguistics who has done important work to advance scholarship on the Greek New Testament. Steve’s work in discourse studies has been directly influenced and enriched by Levinsohn, so he was delighted to be able to interact in person with Levinsohn at SBL in London.

At the session on Levinsohn’s work, Steve surprised Levinsohn with a book written in his honor, Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. Levinsohn.

This Festschrift has been in the works for awhile. We’ve been keeping it a secret for over a year, so we’re thrilled not only to present it to Levinsohn for the first time, but to also make it available to all Logos users.

In addition to Steve’s introduction, the Festschrift contains contributions from Iver Larsen, Stanley E. Porter, Robert A. Dooley, Regina Blass, R. J. Sim, Constantine R. Campbell, Buist Fanning, Steven E. Runge, Margaret G. Sim, Lindsay J. Whaley, Rick Brannan, Nicholas A. Bailey, Randall Buth, and Jenny Read-Heimerdinger.

Why are all these scholars honoring Levinsohn? Each of these scholars has had their work challenged or influenced by Levinsohn’s work, including Steve Runge’s own Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament and Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament. Levinsohn has done more than perhaps anyone else to apply the principles of discourse grammar to New Testament scholarship. He’s meticulously examined how languages operate and the rules they follow—and the implications for reading, studying, and translating the text of the New Testament.

Right now you can pre-order Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation at a discount for a limited time. Get it now!

Want to share how your study of the Greek New Testament been affected by Levinsohn’s work? Want to thank Levinsohn yourself? Leave a note in the comments!

Logos 4: Field Search in Wuest’s Word Studies

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsYears ago one of my favorite resources in print was Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament. This four-volume set included Kenneth Wuest’s translation of the NT, commentaries on some NT books, and numerous short articles on various passages and Greek words. Wuest’s goal was to put the Greek language into the hands of the everyday English student of the Bible. His insights into Greek words were wonderful if you could ever find them. The indexing system for the set was not the greatest.

In Logos you can easily access his translation and commentaries. But what about all those articles about Greek words? Here’s a little searching trick that will help:

  • Either create a Collection for Wuest’s Word Studies or just open the book on the screen
  • Click the Search icon
  • Select Basic as the search type (1)
  • Select Wuest’s Word Studies from the drop down list where you select the book(s) to be searched (2)(3)
  • Click the first drop list which usually says All Text (4)
  • Click the arrow next to Search Fields (5)
  • Click the box Large Text (6)

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #1)

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #2)

Here’s what you have just done. Logos calls the headings of Wuest’s articles, Large Text. You set up a field search indicating you do not want to search all of the text in the resource just the field Large Text!

  • Type temple in the Find box
  • Press the Enter key

You just searched the Large Text field for the word temple. Logos finds an article entitled Temple. Click the link and you are now reading about two Greek words both translated temple in the NT! Try the same search for love, grace, world, etc.! Enjoy the riches of Wuest’s insights into the Greek language.

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #3)

Let us know, what percentage of your study time is spent studying Greek?

Public Beta of the Logos Android App Now Available

The public beta of the Logos Android app is here, and we’re looking for users to put it through the paces!

With the Logos app on your Android, your on-the-go library, featuring many titles from your Logos 4 collection, is just a click away. Enjoy features like previewing Bible verses as they appear in the text, navigating books with verse selector or through the table of contents, and pulling up footnotes with one simple tap. And since this is just the Beta version, there are many more features to come!

How To Get the Beta Android App Now

Before downloading the beta version of the app, it’s worth noting that “beta” is another way of saying “still under development.” The beta version is for users who like to test software, report bugs, and see the exciting things coming down the pike.

To download the beta Logos Android app, visit this download page on your Android device. Once that webpage opens, simply tap the link that says “Tap Here to Install Logos On Your Device” to begin downloading the Logos app.

Logos for Android can be used on any Android 2.1 or newer device. The app requires about 20MB of free space on the device and an SD card (some devices, like Nexus S, have the equivalent of an SD card built in).

Stay in the Loop

Be sure to visit the Android forum page to report any problems and discuss the app with other Android users. You can also sign up for the Android Email List from your Logos account by following these steps:

  1. Go to your Logos account notifications.
  2. An Email list will appear. Towards the bottom, you’ll see the Android Interest Group. Check that box.
  3. Click Update to save those preferences.

 

Spread the Word!

Logos already has a huge following of iPhone and iPad users. Now’s the time to show the world just how amazing Bible study can be when you throw Android into the mix. If you’re excited about the future of Logos for Android, Tweet about it (#Logos4Android) or Like this blog post. It may even be worth blogging your thoughts as the world of Bible study continues to open up on Android!

Have fun exploring this new app, and let us know your favorite feature!

 

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