Archive - June, 2011

Logos 4: Clear Your Desktop with One Click

mp|seminars TipsLast Monday’s blog, “Quickly Clean Up a Messy Desktop,” generated some good discussion. One particular comment, given by a Mr. Joe Bella, gave another user a tip for clearing their screen using the Close all command.

We give many tips and shortcuts throughout Camp Logos and in the Camp Logos LIVE DVDs, and this is one of those tips!

There will be times when you are using Logos 4 that you’ll want to clear all of the open resources, tools, and guides that are open on your screen. You can either close each panel individually or use a shortcut:

  • In the Command box, type close all

If you press Enter, the screen will clear. But what if you wanted that command on your Shortcuts bar?

  • Type close all in the Command box (do not press Enter) (See image 1.)
  • Click and drag the Close all command to your Shortcuts bar (See image 2.)

Image 1:

Close-All Toolbar

Image 2:

Close-All Toolbar

You’ll now see a Close all icon on your Shortcuts bar. Whenever you want to clear your screen, just click the icon!

Close-All Toolbar

Do you use your Shortcuts toolbar? If yes, what are some of your favorite shortcuts? Let us know by leaving us a comment.

The Feature-Filled Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament

The Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament (ACNT), on prepub now, is truly a resource for all. It offers something for everyone: Students can explore basic messages of the New Testament books and use the commentaries as a research tool for papers; Laypeople will find the commentaries helpful for personal or group Bible study; and pastors can use the commentaries for sermon and lesson preparation.

By explaining the text of the New Testament section by section, the fifteen volume Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament aims to bring the best of biblical scholarship on some of the most vital issues in the New Testament.

Each volume in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is loaded with these great features:

  • Introduction and topical overview of the New Testament book
  • Analysis of the book’s influence in church history
  • Discussion of textual issues
  • Review of historical topics like authorship and dating
  • Investigation of literary conventions and exegetical and interpretive challenges
  • List of other helpful resources like books, articles, and reference works for further study

Appealing to all, the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is a great addition to your Bible study library. Not only will Scripture references in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament be linked to the Greek New Testament or your English translation, you can also link the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament to other commentaries in your library. Be sure to grab the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Have you used any of the Augsburg New Testament commentaries? Leave us a comment and tell us about it.

Logos Wins Prestigious Software Industry Award

Logos Bible Software 4: 2011 CODiE Award WinnerLogos Bible Software 4 has been named the winner of the SIIA’s prestigious CODiE Award for Best Educational Reference Solution.

With the release of Logos Bible Software 4 back in November 2009, we knew we had something special. Logos 4 was all-new. It was like no other product out in the marketplace, and like no other product we had produced before. We knew we had introduced a brand new award-wining software. It just wasn’t offical, until now.

Logos 4 has just been recognized by the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) as the Best Educational Reference Solution.

Since 1986, the SIIA’s CODiE Awards program has showcased the software and information industry’s finest products. The award holds the distinction of being the software industry’s only peer-reviewed award as SIIA members are comprised of leading companies in the business software, digital content, and education technology industries. Throughout the award’s history, this is the first time Bible study software has not only been named a finalist, but has also gone on to win the SIIA’s CODiE Award in its category.

Due to the large undertaking in rebuilding Logos from the ground up—instead of simply reusing 15–20-year old code for an update—we hoped Logos users would find Logos 4 to exceed their expectations. It did. Logos users quickly navigated past the initial learning curve Logos 4 posed, and discovered a new way of doing Bible study. And the CODiE Award judges got to see exactly what makes Logos 4 so special.

Judges put Logos 4 through a stringent review process consisting of evaluating product-specific material and online support articles and training videos. Finally, a live online product demonstration was coordinated so judges could see a first-hand demonstration before evaluating and scoring Logos 4. Part of the evaluation focused on the program’s customization features, ease of use, navigation, richness and focus of search results, and use of graphics, among other components.

Based on the above components, Logos Bible Software 4 seemed to be exactly what the Best Educational Reference Solution category was intended for. Among others in the same category, Logos 4 beat out NBC News Archives on Demand from NBC Learn.

Some 425 products and services were nominated this year. Then third-party judges reviewed and evaluated each item before determining finalists. SIIA members then reviewed the finalists and voted to select the winners.

Winning the 2011 CODiE Award now puts Logos Bible Software in the company of past CODiE Award winners such as Adobe, Dell, Cision, Red Hat, SalesForce, Wall Street Journal Professional, and Zendesk.

In the nearly twenty years Logos Bible Software has been around, winning the CODiE Award is a crowning achievement for an excellent product, but more so, for the world-class team here at Logos who is dedicated to providing the best Bible study tool available.

Moving forward, we are committed more than ever to excellence and to being a leader in educational technology. Please leave a comment letting us know how Logos Bible Software 4 has changed the way you do Bible study. And if you are still haven’t upgraded to Logos 4, isn’t it time you discovered what you’re missing?

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1

Sproul

What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

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