Archive - October, 2008

Learning from Your Heroes’ Heroes

Some people’s opinions carry a lot of weight, and rightfully so. For many, John Piper is one of those people. It’s hard to overstate his influence on evangelicalism. His preaching and writings are powerful and his wedding of passion and God-centered theology is contagious.

Like many of you, I’ve learned much from him—and, consequently, from his teachers.

Just as God uses John Piper to mold and shape people’s lives, God has used many people—living and dead—to shape John Piper. It’s wise to seek to learn from them as well.

I discovered Jonathan Edwards—like I’m sure many others have—due to the central role he has played for Piper. Of course, I knew about Edwards in my “pre-Piper” days, but Piper led me to really delve into his writings.

I’m eager to have Henry Alford’s Greek Testament in my digital library before too long (just a few more pre-orders needed!), largely because of what Piper had to say about it.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae Commentary (21 Vols.)Another author whom Piper has created interest in is Charles Simeon, whose massive Horae Homileticae (Hours of Homilies) was nearly impossible to obtain until we produced a digital edition of it. (Read the story of how it all came to be.) Now the entire collection containing 54 years of Simeon’s expository sermons covering the entire Bible is again available—and, I might add, much more useful!

At the 1989 Desiring God Pastors Conference, John Piper gave his annual biographical sketch on the life of Charles Simeon. It was entitled “Brothers, We Must Not Mind a Little Suffering.” You can listen to the message or read it online. If you have the Piper collection, you can read the expanded edition right in Libronix.

According to Piper, Horae Homileticae “is the best place to go to research Simeon’s theology. One can find his views on almost every key text in the Bible.” (Roots of Endurance, 86). The depth and power of Simeon’s ministry was rooted in “a life of prayer and meditation.” As a result, “what Simeon experienced in the Word and prayer was extraordinary. It is so utterly different from the counsel that we receive today that it is worth looking at carefully” (Roots of Endurance, 106-07).

For a limited time, we’re offering Simeon’s 21-volume Horae Homileticae for more than 50% off the retail price when you use coupon code BIOGRAPHY.

Bloodmobile Parks at Logos

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

To play our part in the ever present need for blood, Logos organized a mobile donation unit from Puget Sound Blood Center (PSBC) to park outside our downtown offices this past Friday as our employees volunteered their arms—some, for the first time—and collected 19 units of life-sustaining blood.

Nearly 900 units of blood are needed each day in order to maintain PSBC’s desire to have a four-day supply of blood at all times. According to the PSBC website, “every two minutes someone in western Washington needs a blood transfusion.”

It is great knowing that PSBC, a non-profit, community-supported organization, supplies patients and hospitals in western Washington, allowing our donations to be redistributed throughout our own communities.

We were privileged to contribute to our community in a meaningful and practical way. Our one-day drive helped register 82 donors, collect 19 units of blood, and will benefit up to 57 patients! A needle prick is not a bad trade-off when a life can be saved.

Enjoy some pictures and a short video clip below.

Here’s a short clip of the action.

The Future of Academic Publishing

Andy Naselli, a good friend of mine and an avid Logos user, points out a relevant quote in a new book from Crossway: The New Media Frontier: Blogging, Vlogging, and Podcasting for Christ, edited by John Mark Reynolds and Roger Overton. In his chapter, “Professors with a New Public: Academics and New Media,” Fred Sanders avers,

The coming crisis in academic publishing is centered on the expense of printing and distributing scholarly works with an extremely narrow focus. Electronic publishing is the obvious source of a solution to this problem. The current editorial systems could stay in place just as they are, with the cost of production dropping to a fraction of the current system. It may be a long time before paperless publication is desirable for all users, but in academia it seems like an obvious need. The current system . . . must find a way out of its deadlock. (p. 172)

We’re happy to be a large part of this solution.

If you’ve been following our Pre-Pub offerings for the last couple of years, you’re well aware that we are publishing digital editions of a host of expensive academic resources. While the front-end costs of high-end digital publishing aren’t small (especially if we have to work from print rather than digital sources), the on-going costs are significantly less allowing volumes that cost $100-200 or even more in print to be available for significantly less digitally. This set was a perfect illustration of the savings that digital can offer: Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 Vols.).

On a closely related note, you may remember that back in May Dale Pritchett addressed this subject in his presentation “Logos in the Classroom.” If you missed it, be sure to give it a listen or read the transcript.

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