Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier

As many Bible college and seminary students (and teachers!) can attest, learning Greek can be a challenging task. “It’s Greek to me!” hasn’t become a well-known expression without good reason.

One of our goals here at Logos is to facilitate learning and using the original languages. We offer a huge number of Hebrew and Greek resources. But as helpful and essential as grammars are for learning Greek, reading books isn’t enough for many students. They need to hear it and speak it to get it to stick.

We introduced our Greek Pronunciation Addin a couple of years ago (a Hebrew Pronunciation Addin is on Pre-Pub). It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale. The addin allows students to reinforce standard pronunciations, but only for lemmas (the dictionary form) and only one word at a time.

Learning the proper pronunciation for inflected forms involves a little more guesswork, especially for students learning Greek on their own without the help of an instructor.

With the new Greek Audio Bible, you can now hear Professor John Schwandt read any passage in the Greek New Testament. Simply enter a passage, and click play. The blue arrow will move with the audio to help you follow along in your Greek New Testament. If the normal reading speed is too fast, you can adjust it to slow or slower.

This is sure to be a helpful tool for beginner and intermediate Greek students.

Find out more at the product page, or see it in action in this video demonstration.

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25 Responses to “Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier”

  1. R Chambers July 18, 2008 at 8:23 am #

    I have been waiting for this for a long time.
    I notice it says that it will be “included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold.” Will those of us who already own Silver and Gold get this addin at a discount or will we have to pay full price?

  2. Randy McRoberts July 18, 2008 at 8:37 am #

    I’ve pre-ordered this one. But the one I really want is the audio Hebrew Bible. Is that in the works?

  3. Phil Gons July 18, 2008 at 8:39 am #

    The statement, “It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale.” refers NOT to the new Greek Audio Bible, but to the Greek Pronunciation Addin. It’s important not to confuse these two.
    The *Greek Pronunciation Addin* comes in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and can be purchased individually.
    The *Greek Audio Bible* is on Pre-Pub and does not come in any of our base packages. It is currently being offered at the discounted Pre-Pub price, but there are no further discounts being offered since it is a completely distinct product.
    Hope this helps.

  4. Phil Gons July 18, 2008 at 8:44 am #

    Randy, I haven’t heard anything about a Hebrew Audio Bible yet, but it’s possible that there might be something in the works. I’ll pass this suggestion along.

  5. TFJ July 18, 2008 at 3:35 pm #

    I live in Korea. There is a handful of foreigners here who speak reasonably fluent Korean, but they are, eternally, non-native speakers. They will never be mistaken for native speakers, and I certainly would not use their tapes to study Korean pronunciation. Then why would you want a non-native Greek speaker, namely John D. Schwandt, to record the audio? Sure, he teaches Greek, and sure he travels regularly to Greece, but it’s obvious his pronunciation is inferior to a native-speaker. Why not use Spiros Zodhiates’ tapes, or any native-Greek speaker right off the street?

  6. Phil Gons July 18, 2008 at 4:34 pm #

    TFJ, that’s a fair question. Allow me to offer a few comments in response:

    1. The purpose of the Greek Audio Bible is to help students learn how biblical Greek works, not how it sounded 2,000 years ago. It’s to help students become more comfortable with recognizing and pronouncing Greek words in the classroom, not on the street of Greece.
    2. Since Koine Greek is a dead language, it’s not important that students’ (or teachers’) pronunciation be identical to first-century Greek speakers, even if we could agree on what that might have sounded like. Pronunciation is important only as an agreed upon convention to aide in learning the language.
    3. Most students who will buy the Greek Audio Bible are using a pronunciation scheme very similar to the one that Dr. Schwandt uses. This will make it much easier for the Greek Audio Bible to help students learn Greek than if we had released an audio recording in Modern Greek or a reconstructed Koine pronunciation that most people don’t use.
    4. The Greek Audio Bible addin was designed to allow for multiple data sets, so it’s possible that we could provide a more Greek-sounding reading as well. It will depend if there is sufficient interest for this, and if we are able to license something.

    Hope this helps.

  7. josh s blake August 17, 2008 at 6:58 pm #

    I need this, will it go to production soon? I can’t wait. Hope to see it quickly.

  8. Robinson Mana August 28, 2008 at 2:12 am #

    Dear Sir,
    I am a M.Div student in the Philippines. Let me ask a question about can I subscribe Hebrews/Greek audio bible and audio grammar. If you could, let me know. Thank you.
    In Christ,
    Robinson Mana
    Philippines

  9. Kevin M. Shaw September 4, 2008 at 11:04 am #

    Does this work with all the Greek texts such as the Robinson/Pierpont or only the NA27 (I have NA26)?
    Thanks,
    Kevin

  10. Phil Gons September 4, 2008 at 11:19 am #

    Kevin, yes it does work with NA26 as well.

  11. Kevin M. Shaw September 4, 2008 at 11:37 am #

    Thanks for the quick response.
    More importantly for me, does this mean that it also works with the Majority Text?
    Thanks,
    Kevin

  12. Phil Gons September 4, 2008 at 11:52 am #

    I spoke too soon. It does work with NA26 and the Majority Text, but the arrow doesn’t appear. You’ll have to follow along without the arrow, but it will automatically move you to the next verse with the audio.

  13. Phil Gons September 4, 2008 at 12:10 pm #

    One more follow-up: keep in mind that the audio dataset is for the NA27, so while it may “work” with other Greek texts, it will actually be reading the words of the NA27.

  14. Jon Haley September 30, 2008 at 6:47 am #

    I would also love to see this with a native, modern Greek reading. I actually set this up myself in Libronix several months (with chapter-by-chapter audio files) ago with both Spiros Zodhiates and John Simon. At that time I thought to myself, “Wouldn’t it be great if Logos set this up in a verse by verse format?” A few weeks later your announcement was made. I was thrilled, but would find native pronunciation a real plus for fluidity and naturalness.

  15. Bill Tucker March 19, 2009 at 1:59 pm #

    Please forgive my question, but I think I’m missing something here. If I purchase the “Greek Audio Bible” will the text along with the moving arrow function on my laptop? I do not understand the purpose for NA26 or NA27?
    Will this product work by itself on my laptop, or will something else be required in addition? Will I be required to purchase some additional Greek text in order for this software to work?

  16. Phil Gons March 19, 2009 at 2:51 pm #

    No problem, Bill. The Greek Audio Bible will work all by itself, but to a limited degree. Since it doesn’t include a Greek text, you’ll have just the audio. If you want to take advantage of the integration of the audio with the text, you could buy a supported Greek text or use it in conjunction with one of our base packages. Hope this helps.

  17. Sidney W. April 15, 2009 at 8:40 am #

    Shalom Logos.com,
    Is there anyway to right click on a single word and have it play the pronunciation?
    Sid

  18. Phil Gons April 15, 2009 at 1:19 pm #

    No, the Greek Audio New Testament does not currently have this functionality. You may want to check out the Greek Pronunciation Addin, which will allow you to right-click on any word in a morphologically tagged Greek text and have its lemma pronounced.

  19. bryant April 16, 2009 at 5:15 am #

    I’m a little lost on the downloading and instalation of the greek audio NT. I have downloaded it but can not seem to find it in my library anywhere. It suggestions,
    thanks

  20. Phil Gons April 21, 2009 at 3:36 pm #

    Bryant,
    It’s a toolbar, so you won’t find it in My Library. Right-click on the toolbar area and click on “Audio Bible” to get it to show up. If you need further help, feel free to contact our Customer Service team: customerservice@logos.com or 800-875-6467.

  21. shalom77 May 15, 2009 at 6:12 pm #

    I can’t find resource (audio bible) in toolbar. I have purchased the resource. why?

  22. Phil Gons May 18, 2009 at 3:01 pm #

    Our Customer Service team should be able to help you out. Feel free to contact them at 800-875-6467 or customerservice@logos.com.

  23. James June 10, 2009 at 12:55 pm #

    Just purchased this and love it. I followed along with the NA27 as I listened to 1 John (6 times in a row) over and over again. I can’t say enough good things about this product. Very much worth the money.

  24. Douglas December 29, 2009 at 9:09 pm #

    How come the Greek Audio Bible is not showing on my Logos 4? Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  25. Phil Gons December 30, 2009 at 9:37 am #

    Just open up your Greek New Testament and hit Ctrl+R to play the Greek Audio Bible. You can also click the book cover and choose “Read aloud” from the panel menu. Or with your Greek NT open, type “Start Reading” into the Command Bar.