Don’t Forget the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament

We’ve given frequent attention to the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament here on the blog. It’s a tremendous collection of resources. The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament, the other set of NT syntax resources, hasn’t been in the spotlight quite as much, mostly because it is still a work in progress. At present it covers the following 11 books: Romans, 1 Corinthians, Hebrews, James, 1-2 Peter, 1-3 John, Jude, and Revelation. (If you don’t have access to all of them, make sure to update to 3.0d to get the latest LSGNT resources and syntax database. A revised version of the LSGNT that includes 2 Corinthians and Galatians is included in 3.0e, which is now in beta.)
But don’t let its incompleteness keep you from taking advantage of the wealth of information available here. Unlike the OpenText.org resources, the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament resources use the traditional syntactical categories that perhaps the majority of Greek students are familiar with, so it will likely prove to be the most helpful for students as they learn and teachers as they instruct.
When I was in seminary I had the opportunity to teach elementary and intermediate Greek. I was always looking for more examples to show my students so they could learn the grammatical concepts that we were covering in class. Most grammars provide several examples—Wallace’s Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics was especially helpful in this regard—but I was always running down additional examples to discuss in class or to use in handouts, exercises, quizzes, and tests.
How I wish that I had had access to the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament when I was teaching the genitive absolute, the purpose infinitive, the dative direct object, the nominative of appellation, or the double accusative. In about 15 seconds, I can open the Syntax Search tool and generate a list of 55 genitive absolutes, 113 purpose infinitives, 122 dative direct objects, 26 nominatives of appellation, or 78 double accusatives—plenty of fresh material for in-class examples, handouts, quizzes, and tests. It’s as simple as adding a Word to the query, checking the box next to the grammatical category for which you want to generate a list, and clicking Search.

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What a time saver this would have been!
But these tools aren’t just for teachers. Put them in the hands of your students and have them analyze all 68 of the attributive participles in John’s letters or the 85 subjective genitives in Romans, for example. Simple access to so many examples will surely make grasping abstract grammatical concepts much more attainable.
So don’t forget about the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament. It is included in the top four base packages (Original Languages, Scholar’s, Scholar’s Silver, and Scholar’s Gold). If you haven’t yet upgraded, visit our upgrade page to see your options.
Check out our other blog posts dealing with the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament:

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6 Responses to “Don’t Forget the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament”

  1. Peter Nathan January 11, 2008 at 12:10 pm #

    Interesting that you say that the Lexham will automatically update. I’ve run the update facility twice over the past two days and still have no access to Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians or Revelation. What gives?

  2. Richard L January 11, 2008 at 1:16 pm #

    Thanks Phil … i didn’t realise all this was lurking under the hood. Very useful for strengthening my patchy syntax knowledge.

  3. Kj January 11, 2008 at 6:57 pm #

    I also do not have access to Romans, 1 and 2 Cor or Revelation. Yet I have 3.0d
    Any ideas?

  4. Phil Gons January 12, 2008 at 1:16 pm #

    I’m not sure. Try this link and this one. You could update to 3.0e, which is just about ready to move from RC to being the released version.

  5. Peter Nathan January 14, 2008 at 10:47 am #

    That resolved the problem perfectly. Thanks for the tip.
    P

  6. Phil Gons January 14, 2008 at 10:49 am #

    Great. Glad that worked.