New International Greek Testament Commentaries

All 12 volumes of the New International Greek Testament Commentaries are now available as individual downloads. Considering the massive amount of information in each commentary, the electronic versions will be a welcome addition to your digital library. You’ve heard the sales pitch before—electronic books save you time by bringing you straight to the information you need in seconds rather than hours. With print editions of thousand-page books you get lots of content and constant page turning. The electronic edition is a welcome alternative because you keep the great content while cutting your research time exponentially.

So what type of commentaries are the NIGTC? That question is best answered in the foreward of each volume. Senior editors Donald A. Hagner and I. Howard Marshall write:

“At a time when the study of Greek is being curtailed in many schools of theology, we hope that the NIGTC will demonstrate the continuing value of studying the Greek New Testament and will be an impetus in the revival of such study.


The volumes of the NIGTC are for students who want something less technical than a full-scale critical commentary. At the same time, the commentaries are intended to interact with modern scholarship and to make their own scholarly contribution to the study of the New Testament. The wealth of detailed study of the New Testament in articles and monographs continues without interruption, and the series is meant to harvest the results of this research in an easily accessible form. The commentaries include, therefore, extensive bibliographies and attempt to treat all important problems of history, exegesis, and interpretation that arise from the New Testament text.”

When these guys say their books have a “wealth of detailed study” they really mean it. Five of the commentaries are more than 800 pages in print form. (The volume on First Corinthians tops out at a whopping 1,479 pages!) Several of the books have received awards from organizations such as the Evangelical Publishers Association and Christianity Today.

In terms of value, the best way to go would be purchasing the 12-volume collection. To show our thanks to blog readers, Logos is now offering a discount on the NIGTC collection. Just enter coupon code NIGTC during checkout and your price will be reduced to $449.95. If you would prefer to mix and match the commentaries you want you’ll find links to each individual commentary below. For those who are studying any of the New Testament books covered in these volumes look no further than the NIGTC.

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6 Responses to “New International Greek Testament Commentaries”

  1. Tom Reynolds November 8, 2007 at 10:45 am #

    Mark,
    I’m sure you would agree that in terms of value the best way to go would be for people to buy the Gold package, http://www.logos.com/gold, which includes this set along with so much more.

  2. Mark Van Dyke November 8, 2007 at 11:10 am #

    Good point, Tom! I completely agree.

  3. Jonely Moy November 8, 2007 at 11:24 am #

    This commentary set plus the UBS Handbooks was savings enough and reason enough for me to purchase the Gold package! Everything else including the New American Commentary, plus Pulpit, plus Bibles, dictionaries and a ton of other stuff is thrown in for free.

  4. Mike November 8, 2007 at 8:11 pm #

    Everything else including the New American Commentary, plus Pulpit, plus Bibles, dictionaries and a ton of other stuff is thrown in for free.
    That’s classic. And maybe true; the NIGTC is a wonderful set, and one of the highlights to the Gold package.

  5. Steve Maling November 9, 2007 at 2:27 pm #

    Many, MANY thanks for making individual volumes available! I’m about to download Luke after what seems like a VERY long wait for the opportunity to do so. At 71 I don’t expect to be around long enough to work through all the wonderful things in the Gold package, so this option helps another segment of your variegated population:)
    Steve

  6. mike November 10, 2007 at 1:08 am #

    I thought I had the first sentence of my comment italicized, was trying to quote, not copy, what Jonely wrote. :-)