Shipping Soon: Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha

Order the 2-vol. Greek Apocryphal GospelsI’m really excited about the upcoming release of the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha collection, which was announced 11 months ago on the Logos blog.

While this was originally intended to be a collection of morphologically analyzed Greek texts, it now includes a separate volume of English translations.

And there are introductions to each translation, geared toward the Christian reader new to this material. That was one of my primary goals while working through the material and writing the introductions.

It looks like I was able to meet that goal. We sent out some pre-release review copies, and here’s what the early readers are reporting. Check out the full reviews for more on how these documents are necessary and useful in the study of the early church.

The Apocryphal Gospels are significant for what they tell us about the Gospel tradition and Christian origins. These two books on Apocryphal Gospels by Rick Brannan are a great pair of resources for anyone who wants immediate access to reliable texts, translations, and introductions on their PC or tablet of non-canonical Jesus literature.
— Michael F. Bird, lecturer in theology and New Testament at Crossway College in Brisbane, Australia (full review)

This work is a very valuable contribution that goes beyond previous lists of sayings and publications of only the English gospels. Rick’s brief but insightful comments about each of the sayings, variants, and gospels round out his work in a way that makes it accessible to both lay readers and scholars.
—William C. Varner, professor of Bible and Greek, The Master’s College (full review)

Rick Brannan’s edition of the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha for Logos offers an important new resource that anyone interested in the early history of Christianity will want to have. . . . I expect this exciting resource will play an important role not only in providing more convenient access for scholars and students already in the habit of studying these texts, but in introducing a wider audience to them as well. Many thanks to Rick Brannan and Logos for their role in not merely providing a useful tool for the already-interested, but also helping to highlight these important texts and make them accessible to others who might not otherwise encounter them or realize their importance for our understanding of the ancient church!
— James F. McGrath, Clarence L. Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language & Literature, Butler University (full review)

Rick Brannan has taken the concept so brilliantly executed by Jeremias and improved it. High praise indeed I realize but completely justifiable—for in the soon to be released Logos edition titled Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha, Brannan offers the Greek texts of the ‘sayings of Jesus’ which are found outside the Gospels (in the letters of Paul and other New Testament texts along with extracanonical early Christian literature) along with introductions and translations. He also provides the more important ‘gospels’ which didn’t make the canonical cut, again in both the original Greek editions and in translation.
—Jim West, adjunct professor of biblical studies, Quartz Hill School of Theology (full review)

In his latest contribution to the study of early Christian literature, Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments and Agrapha, Rick Brannan places pseudepigraphal gospels, agrapha, and fragments in their due place, allowing the scholar quick access to a world that could reshape some of our understanding of early Christian theological and literary development.
—Joel L. Watts, author, Mimetic Criticism and the Gospel of Mark: An Introduction and Commentary (full review)

The apocryphal Gospels are crucial for a thorough comprehension of Christian origins, especially historical and theological trajectories into the second century and beyond. Brannan assembles an impressive collection of apocryphal Jesus tradition in Greek and English which not only provides us with new editions of the usual suspects, but also spans significant fragmentary papyrological documents as well. Unique search capabilities enable linguistic analysis for some of the literarily closest material we have to the canonical Gospels due to the digital format of these texts. Highly recommended for anyone interested in serious study of early Christianity and its literature.
— Andrew W. Pitts, Bethel Seminary, San Diego

Pre-Pub pricing for Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha is only available for a short time. Once it ships, the price will go up. Ensure you get the lowest price by signing up for the Pre-Pub today!

What Is God’s Purpose for Your Church?

Pastors, seminary students, and scholars: transform your ministry with a two-day journey into the Word.

April 11–12 in Chicago, Logos is sponsoring Pastorum Live 2013, a conference focused on unpacking Scripture and the role of the church.

Study the church’s purpose from Genesis to Revelation

Pastorum will feature 10 scholars and pastors from leading Bible colleges, seminaries, and churches. Our expositors and faculty will help you understand how to unpack and fulfill your church’s mission while communicating practical, scriptural truths to your community.

You’ll learn how to communicate Scripture in profound and relevant ways, applying the text to real-life people in real-life situations.

The conference will be held at Park Community Church in downtown Chicago. You can stay at one of many surrounding hotels. Registration is now open at a discounted rate of just $79 through March 8.

You don’t want to miss this event. Create a healthier church and ministry, and enrich your personal Bible study by learning to dig into Scripture.

Register now and we’ll see you at Pastorum!

9 Provocative Quotes about Satan

Lewis Sperry Chafer is the author of February’s Free Book of the Month, Satan. The book is free, but only until tomorrow—get it today!

Here’s a preview:

1. Creation of Satan: “Since he was created, he is not self-existent, and never can be free from his dependence upon the Creator.” (Chap. 1, page 13)

2. Place Satan dwells: “That the earth and the air are his present abode must be accepted on the testimony of Scripture: in spite of the almost universal impression that he is now in hell.” (Eph. 6:11, 12, 1 Peter 5:8, 9) (Chap. 1, page 16)

3. Satan’s sentence executed: “And in Rev. 12:7–12, where Satan is cast out into the earth and the execution of his sentence is begun, the announcement is made by a great voice in heaven, ‘Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ.’ There is no evidence of a gradual process here; all is sudden and decisive.” (Chap. 2, page 34)

4. Satan and unbelievers: “According to Scripture, the relation of the unbelieving to Satan is far more vital than a mere pleasure-seeking allegiance.” (Chap. 3, page 45)

5. Satan’s dominion: “Again, Satan’s dominion is limited in that “there is no power but of God: and the powers that be are ordained of God (Rom. 13:1). In this Scripture it is revealed that Satan, though in authority, is not wholly free from his Creator, and that any direction of the governments of the world which he exercises is by permission from God.” (Chap. 4, page 51)

6. Satan’s authority over demons: “Although their origin cannot be definitely traced, it is probable that they were created as subjects of Satan in the primal glory, as he, also, was created as their prince and king. Satan, being in authority over these beings, doubtless drew them after him in his sinful attempt to thrust himself into the place of God.” (Chap. 5, 63)

7. Sin of Satan: “True, he has lowered his Creator, in his own mind, to a level where he supposes himself to be in legitimate competition with Him, both for authority over other beings and for their worship.” (Chap. 6, page 73)

8. Satan impersonations: “Thus his desire to be like the Most High has led him to a blasphemous attempt to imitate all the separate manifestations of the three Persons of the Godhead.” (Chap. 7, page 89)

9. Satan’s reliance on truth: “It has already been seen that the method of counterfeiting, if successful, will require Satan to appropriate and incorporate in his false systems every available principle of the true; for the deception of the counterfeit depends wholly upon its likeness to the real.” (Chap. 9, page 106)

LewisSperryChafer1929About Lewis Sperry Chafer

Lewis Sperry Chafer was born on this day in 1871, in Red Hook, Ohio. Chafer’s writings, the topic of much debate, are widely regarded as influential in the Evangelical movement in America. Dr. Scofield, Chafer’s Bible college professor, persuaded him to write Satan, which Scofield wrote the foreword for in 1909. Chafer went on to pastor Scofield’s former church in Dallas, TX, upon Scofield’s passing. He also became the founding president of the Evangelical Theological College in 1924. The college was renamed Dallas Theological Seminary in 1936. Chafer passed away August 22, 1952, in Seattle, WA.

Get Chafer’s Satan free!

Win a Kutless Fan Pack from Faithlife!

The Faithlife Study Bible allows you to explore the Word with Christians around the globe. You can study with not only friends and family, but also your favorite authors, teachers, and artists.

Now Faithlife is partnering with Kutless, and giving you the opportunity to be in community with one of the biggest names in Christian music.

Visit FaithlifeBible.com/Kutless to get the FSB for free, and enter referral code “KUTLESS” when creating your account to join the band’s Faithlife group!

Then enter to win a hoodie, T-shirt, signed poster, and signed copy of their CD Believer below!

56% Off the Time-Tested Encyclopedia You’ll Love: Bid Now!

Adding a reliable encyclopedia to your Logos library can do a lot for your Bible study. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition (ISBE) is one such time-tested resource, with contributions from leading twentieth-century theologians such as B. B. Warfield, Archibald Alexander, A. T. Robertson, and H. C. G. Moule. This comprehensive encyclopedia is on Community Pricing, where you can bid what you’d be willing to pay.

When you integrate the ISBE into your library, you’ll be able to look up thousands of words or phrases in the Bible or Apocrypha by right-clicking them and selecting the ISBE from the context menu.

Let’s say you’re reading through the Gospel of Luke and come across Luke 1:7: “But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were advanced in years.” What is the significance of Elizabeth being barren? It brings to mind Abraham and Sarah, but maybe there’s more to it. If you were to look up “barren” in the ISBE 1915 edition, you would find a concise article written by Thomas Rees that gives you a cultural and biblical understanding of barrenness.

“. . . barrenness was a woman’s and a family’s greatest misfortune. The highest sanctions of religion and patriotism blessed the fruitful woman, because children were necessary for the perpetuation of the tribe and its religion. It is significant that the mothers of the Heb[rew] race . . . were by nature sterile, and therefore God’s special intervention shows His particular favor to Israel.”

Further, we read that “metaphorically, Israel, in her days of adversity, when her children were exiled, was barren, but in her restoration she shall rejoice in many children.” This gives us a solid understanding of what being barren would have meant to Jews in that time, which in turn helps us to understand the miraculous birth of John the Baptist.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia covers thousands of topics related to Scripture, history, geography, cultural milieu, and more. Bid now to save 56%!

Note: Do you already own the Ages edition of The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition that was built for Libronix? If you do, you’ll receive this updated collection for free; the files will automatically download when it’s complete. The previous edition was created many years ago, using the best digital files available at the time. We’re rebuilding the 1915 ISBE from the ground up—this collection will contain new, updated files. If you don’t own the 1915 ISBE, enhance your library with one of the most useful and trusted reference collections by placing your bid today!

Build Community with Shared Prayer Lists

“Praying and sinning will never live together in the same heart. Prayer will consume sin, or sin will choke prayer.” —J. C. Ryle

We all know the importance of prayer, but things get in the way—busyness, lack of accountability, lack of reminder and encouragement, forgetting to celebrate when prayers are answered, etc.

If you own a Logos 5 base package, you’re most likely using a feature called “prayer lists” to help take a disciplined approach to prayer. With prayer lists, you can:

  • Schedule prayer requests and see them right in your home screen
  • Take notes and record prayer needs for future reference
  • Decide when to pray and when to get reminders

But what if you could share your prayer lists with friends, family, and church members?

With Faithlife’s prayer list widget, now you can! Your prayer list will sync across Logos 5 and Faithlife, setting you up to seamlessly combine prayer and in-depth Bible study.

Get started with Faithlife’s prayer list widget today

  1. Go to Faithlife.com and create a group
  2. Invite members using their email addresses
  3. Go to your group settings, press “sidebar,” and drag the prayer list widget over to the active tab
  4. Start adding your prayers

Share your existing Logos prayer list with a Faithlife group

  1. Go to Documents.Logos.com
  2. Click the desired prayer list
  3. Select “Action,” and then “Collaborate”
  4. Pick the desired Faithlife group

Share the Faithlife Study Bible today! Just visit FaithlifeBible.com/Giveaway and share it on your social networks.

Logos 5: Sympathetic Highlighting

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently emailed the following to me:

When delivering a message on fellowship, pastors will often mention the “one another” verses as ways we are to serve/care/love one another (sometimes phrased as “one another,” as in “love one another,” and sometimes as “each other,” as in “bear each other’s burdens”).

I’d love to find a definitive list of all these verses. What’s the best way? I could do an English search, but that would vary per translation. Is there a way to do it using Greek?

Here’s my response:

You’re correct that the best search is in Greek rather than English. Let’s assume we don’t know any Greek, but want to search in Greek. Logos is here to help with a feature known as Sympathetic Highlighting:

  • Open an English Bible with the reverse interlinear option, like the ESV
  • Open a Greek Bible, like The Lexham Syntactic Greek NT 
  • Choose the panel menu on each Bible (A)
  • Select Link set A on each (B)

SH 1

  • Click the Visual Filters (three circles) icon on each Bible (C)
  • Select Sympathetic highlighting on each (D)

SH 2

  • Navigate to a “one another” verse, such as Romans 12:10, in one of the Bibles (E)
  • Select the phrase “one another” in the English Bible (F)
  • Notice that Logos automatically “highlights” the corresponding text in the Greek Bible (this is Sympathetic Highlighting) (G)
  • Note that this particular example is very interesting; the English phrase is actually only one word in Greek

SH 3

  • Right-click on the Greek word (H)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource (I)

SH 4

  • Notice that the search results are returned in Greek (J)
  • Click Verses on the search panel (K)
  • Click Add Versions on the search panel (L)

SH 5

  • Type abbreviations of desired Bibles in the Resources box to display the results both in Greek and in whatever English Bibles you want (separate multiple Bibles with commas) (M)
  • Press Enter to add the other Bible(s) to the display area

SH 6

I think this search will get most, if not all, of the “one another,” “each other,” etc., passages in the NT!

**If you like this Logos power-feature, you’ll enjoy the Camp Logos 2 DVD Training, in which Morris emphasizes original-language tools for the English student.

 

This Tool Will Change Your Word Studies Forever

Tools like the Bible Word Study, the Exegetical Guide, and Morph Search make it easy to explore the biblical text, but there’s one new tool in Logos 5 that gets you even closer to word meanings—instantly.

It’s the Bible Sense Lexicon, and it’s going to change the way you think about word studies forever.

What’s a “sense lexicon”?

The Bible Sense Lexicon ties biblical words to their senses. By “sense,” we mean the idea that a word is supposed to communicate. For example, the English word for “run” has many possible senses:

  • To move swiftly by foot
  • To conduct (e.g., to “run a search”)
  • An act of running (e.g., to “go on a run”)

The same principle applies to words in the Bible.

The Bible Sense Lexicon has tied words in the biblical text to their senses, giving you a precise idea of what the biblical authors were trying to get across.

Example: what does “head” mean?

In Isaiah 7:9, we read that “the head of Ephraim is Samaria and the head of Samaria is the son of Remaliah.” It’s obvious that “head” is a metaphor—the nation of Ephraim cannot have a literal physical head the way a human body does. But what does this metaphor mean?

We can activate the Reverse Interlinear ribbon, but without the Bible Sense Lexicon data, we’ll just see a bunch of Hebrew words (along with anything else we choose to display here).

BibleSenseLexicon

That’s great—if we know Hebrew. I don’t, so we’ll right-click it and run a Bible Word Study report on the lemma. (What’s a lemma? Find out here.) We’ll get a comprehensive report on the Hebrew word, how it’s used in the Bible, and lots of possible definitions!

BibleSenseLexiconII

That’s awesome: we see loads of ways this word is used in Scripture. This tool has just accomplished hours of research in seconds. But we still don’t know precisely what sense the word for “head” is used in. Does it mean “top”? “Beginning”? “Chief”? We could open up our regular lexicons and see if any one lists a specific sense for our verse in Isaiah.

Or we could see the sense in the Reverse Interlinear!

Bible Sense Lexicon IV

We can immediately see that the same Hebrew word is used to mean both “capital” and “leader”! So the capital city of Ephraim is Samaria, and the leader of Samaria is the son of Remaliah.

The Bible Sense Lexicon data makes the Reverse Interlinear ribbon one of my favorite tools in Logos 5. It’s a revolutionary way to cut right to a word’s sense—saving us even more time on word studies.

If you’re not using the Bible Sense Lexicon in Logos 5, you’re missing out. Get Logos 5 today—the Bible Sense Lexicon is included in Gold and higher.

Already have Logos 5? Learn to use it for richer Bible study and ministry with our educational resources.

Learn How Greek Developed after the New Testament

When it comes to Greek lexicons in English that cover the millennium following the New Testament, we really only have two options: Lampe’s A Patristic Greek Lexicon and Sophocles’ Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods. And a hardback Lampe goes for upwards of $500–600, normally.

BDAG only covers up to the Apostolic Fathers. So if you want any help with Justin MartyrIrenaeus, or Hippolytus, you’re out of luck.

LSJ only covers up to the non-Christian fifth century. So if you want any help with TheodoretNonnus, or John of Damascus, you’re out of luck.

You’re out of luck, that is, unless you have Sophocles’ lexicon. 1,200 pages long, it covers up to the turn of the twelfth century. That’s almost one page per year.

A Greek professor once told me that studying New Testament Greek in isolation is somewhat like taking a single slice of a tree and trying to understand the whole tree. You must understand the roots to understand where the tree comes from; you must also understand the fruit to understand the tree’s result. A single slice can be misleading.

With LSJ, you can see where the Greek came from.

With BDAG, you can zoom in on a particular slice of time to see how Greek was being used.

And with Sophocles, you can see what direction the Greek took after the New Testament era.

The lexicon isn’t the only resource included in the Sophocles collection. You also get three other resources!

Two of the greatest English lexicographers of the past 200 years, J. H. Thayer and Frederick Danker, both thought very highly of this resource. Thayer thought so highly of it that he edited and republished it himself.

Let’s bring this wonderful resource into the twenty-first century. Bid on it now!

Decide What’s Next and See Designed-for-Digital Resources

If you could design a Bible reference book to meet your needs, what would it look like? It would work seamlessly with your primary study platform, anticipate your questions, and be easy to share. It would use technology to make your work easier, faster, and more effective. It would take you deeper into the Bible and the other resources you own, while emphasizing practicality. It would help you grow while you’re investing in the growth of others. It would introduce you to new resources. And it may even have an easy way to take notes. The resources we create here at Logos are designed with these ideals in mind.

Our first question when approaching any publishing project is, “How can we help you do more and better work for God’s kingdom?” These products are answers to that question.

Take a few minutes to check them out. If you like a product, order it or commit to it on Pre-Pub. What you pre-order determines what we work on next.

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The Bible in Seven Acts collection is your starting point for study and research on the Bible’s historical periods. The collection surveys all the relevant literature on historical events, and brings the findings back to you.

When you order our Pre-Pub products, or spread the word about them on Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms, you make it possible for your preferred project to be created before the others. We come up with ideas, select the best ones, prototype them, and then list them on Pre-Publication. When you commit, you’re telling us what you want created.  So pre-order something today, or pick up one of the works we recently released.