Logos 5: Logos and Knox Theological Seminary

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I, along with other Logos users, recently had the privilege of sitting at the feet of master preacher and communicator Dr. Haddon Robinson. What an honor to listen to his biblical insights as we participated in the course “The Art of Expository Preaching,” part of the Knox / Logos DMin program. We were transformed into sponges as Dr. Robinson guided us through numerous passages, carefully exposing the text’s “big idea.” If you’re not familiar with the Knox / Logos program, please check it out here.

Knox Seminary class

The icing on the cake was having Logos close at hand to check out cross-references and track down Hebrew and Greek words. For example, we examined Mark 4:35–41, in which Jesus calms the storm. Regarding v. 39, “And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, ‘Peace! Be still!,’” Dr. Robinson asked, “Does this wording sound familiar to a previous event in Mark?”

Here’s what I did, and you can do, to answer that question:

  • Open a Bible with the reverse interlinear option, such as the ESV or LEB
  • Navigate to Mark 4:39 (A)
  • Right-click on the word rebuked (ESV) (B)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” (C) | Search this resource (D)

Image 1 for Right Mouse Searching steps

  • Click Aligned on the search panel to display the search hits in a center column (E)
  • Repeat the above search for the word still (ESV) (F)

Image 2 for Right Mouse Searching

These searches, locating all occurrences of the Greek lemmas regardless of how they’re translated in English, replace the Englishman’s Greek (and Hebrew) Concordance print editions that we lugged around.

Notice that Mark 1:25 contains the same words rebuke and be still as Jesus confronts an unclean spirit. Was this just an ordinary, “natural” storm in Mark 4? That’s what we wrestled with in class, and I’ll leave the answer to you.

The point I’m making is that Logos, even in the classroom, provides instant access to biblical information. Remember, don’t leave home without Logos!

 

Save 75% on the Logos March Madness Champion’s Works

Logos March Madness has come down to two authors: D. A. Carson vs. Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

You must vote today before 5 p.m. PST. The winner’s works will be discounted by 75%, and the runner-up’s works will be discounted by 60%. Vote now!

March Madness Champions

Don’t wait for a winner—save up to 50% now

Check out the works of some of this year’s best-selling authors:

Save 50% on titles by N. T. Wright and Charles Spurgeon

Save 45% on titles by Bruce Metzger and A. W. Tozer

Save 40% on titles by Darrell Bock and John Calvin

Save 35% on titles by Gordon Fee and John Owen

Save 30% on titles by Ben Witherington and James Montgomery Boice

Vote now, and be sure to check out all of this year’s deals.

How the Resurrection Triumphs over “YOLO!”

colossians

It would have been hard to get through 2012 without hearing or seeing the acronym YOLO (You Only Live Once). The term regularly trended on Twitter, showed up in Facebook news feeds, and quickly became part of the pop culture vernacular.

Like a modern Carpe Diem, “YOLO!” is the cry of a generation seeking to squeeze all the possible goodness from life. If the end of your one life is death, why deny yourself happiness now?

It may seem nihilistic, but it makes sense. If this is our only opportunity to taste life’s fruit, then we should indulge. Even Paul affirms this in his discussion with the Corinthians, “If the dead are not raised, ‘Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die’” (1 Cor. 15:32). It would seem that, in a closed system in which death is life’s final outcome, “YOLO!” is the only rational response.

But the fact that Jesus rose from the dead changes everything. Here are three ways that Christ’s death and resurrection triumph over “YOLO!”:

1. Christ’s resurrection has made a mockery of death

“And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross. He disarmed the rulers and authorities and put them to open shame, by triumphing over them in him.” (Col. 2:13–15)

Not only are the rulers and authorities—demonic or otherwise—that would hold death over our heads vanquished; they’re humiliated. I love Paul’s imagery here. Jesus didn’t just destroy them, he disarmed them. Imagine an invading horde coming into a city and the king going out and simply taking their weapons from them—how embarrassing.

Christ has removed death’s stinger (1 Cor. 15:51); it no longer has power over us. The grave is not life’s final word.

2. Christ’s resurrection gives us hope

“But we do not want you to be uninformed, brothers, about those who are asleep, that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope. For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep.”—1 Thessalonians 4:13–14

“YOLO” has an intrinsic sadness in it. The reveler who looks at life with a “let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die” mentality cannot help but shrink from death’s inevitability, and mourn for those who’ve passed.

But the resurrection gives us hope! Death isn’t a period at the end of our lives; it’s a comma.

3. Christ’s resurrection is a new beginning

In Romans 8, Paul shows us that Christ’s resurrection kicked off a chain reaction leading to the redemption of all things.

The Spirit of he who raised Christ from the dead dwells in those who belong to him (Rom. 8:11) making us children of God and fellow heirs with Christ (Rom. 8:15–17). And all of creation, which has groaned under the weight and futility of sin has waited for the revealing of the children of God in order that it be set free from its bondage and corruption (Rom. 8:20–22). Within the resurrection of Christ lie the seeds for the restoration of all things.

It’s no wonder that Paul’s heart erupts with the admonition to “rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice.” (Phil. 4:4)

For those who believe death has the final word, to embrace life from a “you only live once” perspective makes perfect sense. But for those whose lives are lived in the light of Christ’s resurrection, nothing in this life is “worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us.” (Rom. 8:18)

The promise of Easter is that, because death is not the end, the pleasures of this world have lost their luster. I may only live once, but thanks to Jesus, it will be one long, glorious life spent in God’s presence.

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

9 Inspirational Quotes from the Early Church

1500 Quotations for PreachersIn January, we announced 1,500 Quotations for Preachers, a five-volume series of quotations from throughout church history. These quotations are extremely helpful in putting together sermons, and can easily be pulled into presentations with the provided quotation slides.

Here are nine inspiring quotes from the Early Church volume:

  1. Tertullian on persecution: “The more often we are mown down by you, the more in number we grow; the blood of Christians is seed.”
  2. Jerome on Scripture reading and prayer: “Let the divine scripture be always in your hands, and give yourself so frequently to prayer that such shafts of evil thoughts as ever assail the young may thereby find a shield to repel them.”
  3. Augustine on procrastination: “God has promised pardon to your conversion; He has not promised a tomorrow to your delay.”
  4. Chrysostom on reconciliation: “We are commanded to have only one enemy, the devil. With him never be reconciled! But with a brother, never be at enmity in your heart.”
  5. Athanasius on the renewal of creation: “The renewal of creation has been the work of the self-same Word that made it at the beginning.”
  6. Cyril of Jerusalem on God’s mercy: “Your accumulated offenses do not surpass the multitude of God’s mercies; your wounds do not surpass the great physician’s skill.”
  7. Gregory of Nazianzus on God’s greatness: “No one has yet breathed the whole air, nor has any mind entirely comprehended, or speech exhaustively contained, the being of God.”
  8. Syncletica of Alexandria on the integrity of teachers: “A man whose house is about to fall down may invite travelers inside to refresh them, but instead they are hurt in the collapse of the house. It is the same with teachers who have not carefully trained themselves in the good life: they ruin their hearers as well as themselves.”
  9. Irenaeus on truth and error: “Error, indeed, is never set forth in its naked deformity, lest, being thus exposed, it should at once be detected. But it is craftily decked out in an attractive dress, so as by its outward form, to make it appear to the inexperienced (ridiculous as the expression may seem) more true than the truth itself.”

Be sure to pick up 1,500 Quotations for Preachers before the price goes up April 9!

The Beautiful Tragedy of Good Friday

Hebrews 10

“Paul’s overriding interest is not in evil men who have done a wicked thing but in a good God who has done a gracious thing.”—Gerard S. Sloyan, The Crucifixion of Jesus: History, Myth, Faith

Like many, I was enthusiastic about Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ when it  premiered in 2004.  My enthusiasm waned considerably about halfway through. I wasn’t turned off because of my weak stomach; I was dismayed at its emphasis. It’s my conviction that it wasn’t the brutality of the Crucifixion that made it significant, but rather the identity of the one crucified. The tragedy is that the creator would allow himself to be humiliated, abused, and ultimately murdered at the hands of his creatures.

The one who would soon lay claim to all authority on heaven and earth (Matt. 28:18) was betrayed with a gesture of familiarity and intimacy (Luke 22:47–53). Those who had sworn their allegiance fled and denied him (Matt. 26:69–75).  The mouth that had summed up the Law and the prophets with the admonition to treat others the way you desire to be treated (Matt. 7:12) was silent as Jesus was beaten and mocked.

A prefect of Rome apathetically dismissed the supreme sovereign of the universe (Matt. 27:24). The world’s only true innocent was scourged and forced to carry the device for his own execution through town. The feet that had walked upon the raging sea, the hands that had only recently healed the sick and raised the dead, were nailed to a rough piece of wood. Christ, who deserved to be elevated, was raised upon a cruel cross. And during history’s most unforgivable act, Jesus exemplified all his teaching in the prayer, “forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

Good Friday, the most tragically beautifully date on the Christian calendar, is set aside to remember the passion of our Lord. It’s tragic for what the creator would suffer at the hands of the creature, and it’s beautiful for the work that was done on that dreadful day. As the writer of Hebrews put it, “we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.” It doesn’t really matter who was ultimately responsible for the Crucifixion. On this day we remember that we were all culpable—and are all beneficiaries.

And because of the humiliation endured that day, the head that wore a crown of thorns is now crowned with glory and honor (Hebrews 2:9), and any crown I receive will be laid at his nail-scarred feet.

Thank you, Jesus.

*   *   *

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

6 Reasons I’m Glad Jesus Left

john 13

Jesus lived. Jesus died. Jesus rose. Jesus left for heaven.

I grew up hearing all about the first three acts of this story and what they mean for Christ, the redeemed, and the lost.

But his ascension is important, too!

And although it didn’t take place until 40 days after the resurrection, verses like John 13:1 make it clear that Jesus’ return to the Father is just as much a part of this story:

“Now before the Feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.”

Here are six reasons I’m glad Jesus returned to the Father:

  1. We can go home, too. Jesus tells his disciples a little later that he’s going to prepare a place for them in his Father’s house. Because Jesus returned to the Father, I can say with Paul that “to live is Christ, and to die is gain”—when I depart, I will be with Jesus.
  2. Jesus mediates for us to God. It’s phenomenal: Jesus, the God-man, advocates for me before the holy and righteous God. He knows what it’s like to be human (Hebrews 4:14–16), but he’s not just asking God to give me a break. Jesus was broken, and because of his perfect sacrifice, he sustains our right relationship with God (Hebrews 9:15).
  3. Jesus says we should rejoice. Jesus is pretty straightforward about this one: “If you loved Me, you would have rejoiced because I go to the Father.” This alone is reason to be glad.
  4. We get the Holy Spirit. Jesus plainly states that he must leave in order to send the Holy Spirit (John 16:7). The Spirit teaches and convicts and comforts us—I’m glad he’s here.
  5. We have the inspired Gospels. Jesus promises his disciples that the Holy Spirit will teach them and remind them of all that he said (John 14:25–26). And that’s good for us, because the disciples were able to give accurate accounts of events they didn’t understand while they were happening (Matthew 15:15–17; 16:9; Mark 6:52; 9:32; John 12:16).
  6. My king is where he belongs. Jesus, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, has taken his seat in glory at the Father’s right hand (Hebrews 1:3). He obeyed, and at his name every knee will bow, and every tongue will confess that he is Lord (Philippians 2:9–11).

Jesus lived. Jesus died. Jesus rose. Jesus reigns forevermore. Amen.

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

The Trials of This Earth Shall Pass

Isaiah 33

“This too shall pass” a phrase commonly heard by those going through periods of mourning or struggle. When viewed in an earthly sense, it can be difficult to believe, since we know struggles often pass only to bring forth different struggles. This life is never free of suffering. Instead, we move through life and its trials, attempting to make it through by leaning on God, and doing our best to glorify him in the process.

Throughout Isaiah 33, a beautiful reminder is painted. A glorious image of the future, paired with the mournful present—a reminder that though we will struggle tremendously throughout this life, we will someday rejoice in the presence of God’s glory.

Rejoicing through forgiveness

Not only will we live in the most perfect place, in the presence of God; we’ll be completely forgiven of our past (Isaiah 33:24). We will be completely free to rejoice and enjoy life in God’s presence, free of guilt and regret. And this all began on the cross with Jesus.

Because of Jesus’ death on the cross, we are able to look forward to one day living in total happiness. We are able push onward because the mourning and sadness that this world holds for us are only temporary. We know that this won’t last forever, so we are able to push forward each day, looking forward to the day when we meet our father and live in the glorious home he has prepared for us.

Looking forward to heaven

“If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. For you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is your life appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.”—Colossians 3:1–4

If it were not for Jesus coming to die, death would be something to dread—a terrible ending to a difficult life. However, we have been given a gift leading to an even more beautiful beginning. Because of God’s grace and forgiveness, we are able to look onward to the place where the Lord in majesty will be for us (Isaiah 33:21).

Easter is an amazing reminder of the fact that “this too shall pass.” Though we go through dark times, times of mourning, loss, and disappointment, we get to look forward to living forever as though we are blameless and perfect, just as we appear because of what Jesus endured for our sake.

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week

Carson vs. Lloyd-Jones—Who Will Win?

Logos March Madness is down to only two authors: D. A. Carson and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

We started with sixty-four authors. Each round, you chose your favorites. Now there’s just one matchup left. And you’ll get a 75% discount on the winner’s works!

Here’s a breakdown of who each author beat in the last five rounds:

carson D. A. Carson:

Round 1: won vs. Jack Hayford
Round 2: won vs. R. C. Sproul
Sweet 16: won vs. J. I. Packer
Elite 8: won vs. John Piper
Final 4: won vs. N. T. Wright

D. A. Carson is the author of popular works such as:

  • Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament
  • Scripture and Truth
  • Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Gospel according to John
  • The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism

 

Martyn-Lloyd-Jones

Martyn Lloyd-Jones:

Round 1: won vs. G. Campbell Morgan
Round 2: won vs. Abraham Kuyper
Sweet 16: won vs. John Newton
Elite 8: won vs. Bruce Metzger
Final 4: won vs. Charles Spurgeon

Some of Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ most popular works include:

  • Seeking the Face of God
  • Revival
  • The Assurance of Our Salvation
  • Courageous Christianity

Vote now to decide which author’s works will be discounted by 75%

And don’t forget to check out some of the other terrific deals on LogosMarchMadness.com:

Have a favorite to win? This is your last chance. Make your case for your favorite to win in the comments.

Vote now! See all deals here.

How to Attend Pastorum for Free

Pastorum Live 2013 (April 11–12) is right around the corner. With leading biblical scholars, you’ll learn about the Bible’s context and background, the church’s identity, and much more. You’ll focus on practical lessons that you can bring home to your congregation.

And now you can go for free! Just bring two members of your staff and your ticket is on us. Already bought your ticket? Get two staffers to register and you’ll get $25 in Logos credit.

Call us to get your free ticket today! 1-800-875-6467

You Cannot. You Can.

1 Corinthians 5

Sometimes I wonder if God is setting me up to fail. Do you? When you read a passage like 1 Corinthians 5:7–8, do you wonder if God’s asking you to do something you cannot?

“Clean out the old leaven so that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Christ, our Passover, also has been sacrificed. Therefore let us celebrate the feast, not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.”

This verse makes it sound like we’re supposed to be perfect—how does that work? And in the middle of all this talk of leaven (yeast), why is it important to remember that Christ our Passover lamb has been sacrificed?

How is Jesus our Passover lamb?

In Exodus 12, God tells the Israelites how to observe the first Passover feast. God is about to send the tenth and final plague upon Egypt: the death of the firstborn. The firstborn of every house will die—unless something else dies first.

That something else is a lamb. A perfect lamb.

Every household is to smear the lamb’s blood on their home’s doorposts and lintel. God himself promises, “when I see the blood I will pass over you, and no plague will befall you.”

The Israelites couldn’t keep the plague out on their own. Just as neither you nor I can stay God’s judgment against us. It’s one reason Jesus came to die—to bear the wrath of God in our place (Romans 5:9).

Jesus does what we cannot

Christ, our Passover has been sacrificed. But how do we clean out the leaven of malice and wickedness? Are we really supposed to be perfect?

In his book Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die, John Piper addresses this question:

“We have been made unleavened in Christ. So we should now become unleavened in practice. In other words, we should become what we are. The basis of all this? ‘For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.’ The suffering of Christ secures our perfection so firmly that it is already now a reality.”

(In case you’d like to see more reasons Jesus came to die, this book is on sale this week.)

Now we do what we can: obey

We’re bought with precious blood, “as of a lamb unblemished and spotless, the blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:19). Our transformation is secured in Christ; now we obey and clean house. When I ponder Jesus’ sacrifice, I face an abundance of reasons to obey:

  • Christ loved me so much that he died for me; why wouldn’t I follow this person?
  • The Bible states that the perfecting work of Christ is done; if I believe this, I’ll behave accordingly.
  • God has given me an opportunity to participate in the process of becoming more like Jesus; it should be a joy to do so.

This transformation is tough. At times, it feels impossible. But God is faithful, and he isn’t telling us to do anything we cannot.

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.