Logos 5: Adjust Read Aloud Speed

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the most rewarding aspects of presenting Camp Logos training seminars around the globe is meeting Logos users. We have a great time discussing the Bible in the context of Logos Bible Software.

I also enjoy hearing which of the many Logos features is a person’s favorite. For one, it’s the Word by Word section in the Exegetical Guide. For another, it’s the Translation ring in Bible Word Study. And for another, it’s Copy Bible Verses on the Tools menu.

Here’s one that’s frequently mentioned that may surprise you: Read Aloud, located on the resource panel menu. In case you didn’t know, Logos will read many (but not all) of your books to you. This tool is listed among the favorites for various reasons:

  • Poor eyesight
  • Dyslexia
  • Eye fatigue

If you’ve never used this help, try this:

  • Open a resource such as the Lexham English Bible or Easton’s Bible Dictionary
  • Choose the panel menu on the resource
  • Select Read Aloud
  • Set back and enjoy the reading (A)
  • Notice the control buttons near the Layouts menu (B)

Adjust Reading Speed

To adjust the reading speed:

  • Click the number link on the control bar (four speeds are available) (C)

If you use this feature, please let us know why it’s helpful to you!

Learn Ministry from the Best

bryan chapellKnox Theological Seminary welcomes its newest professor: Dr. Bryan Chapell, distinguished professor of preaching, MDiv, PhD. Dr. Chapell comes to Knox from Covenant Theological Seminary, where he’s president emeritus and adjunct professor of practical theology. He was Covenant’s president from 1994 to 2012.

Dr. Chapell is the author of Christ-Centered Preaching, Using Illustrations to Preach with Power, and other important works. He’ll be teaching introductory homiletics in Knox’s master’s programs and contributing to the DMin’s Preaching and Teaching track. More than that, he’ll be working to strengthen Knox’s culture as a seminary that revels in grace.

Dr. Michael Allen, Knox’s dean of faculty, says, “Few people understand the rhythm of gospel-driven Christianity and its effects on Christ-centered preaching like Dr. Bryan Chapell. For these reasons—dear to our convictions about being a Christ-centered, gospel-driven, mission-focused seminary—we couldn’t be more excited about Dr. Chapell joining the faculty.”

Who you learn from matters

Dr. Chapell isn’t Knox’s only academic heavyweight. Drs. Michael Allen, Jim Belcher, Gerald Bray, Warren Gage, Samuel Lamerson, Jonathan Linebaugh, Haddon Robinson, Bruce Waltke—these are some of our time’s leading teachers and thinkers, and you can learn from them directly.

If you’re passionate about preaching and Bible study, you should always be learning. And Knox gives you the chance to learn from the best. See how Knox’s degrees fit your life at DMin.me and SeminaryDegreesOnline.com.

Prepare for Holy Week with Logos

Palm SundayThis Sunday, March 24, marks the beginning  of the Christian calendar’s high point. Starting with Jesus’ triumphal entrance into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday and culminating with his crucifixion and resurrection, Holy Week is a sacred time for Christians.

To help prepare for this important time, we’ve discounted a number of important resources focusing on the Cross and Resurrection. Meditate on powerful books like:

As an added bonus, tune in to Logos Talk Monday, March 25 through Saturday, March 30 and enjoy daily devotionals post focused on this important season.

We’re excited to share this season with you.

Choose Which Authors Get a 50% Discount!

Round 4 ends tonight at 5 p.m. PST—vote now!

Only four authors will move on to the Final 4. For those four authors, we’ll be marking down a selection of works by 50% off.

Round 3’s projected winners are D. A. Carson and Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The matchups between N. T. Wright vs. Douglas Moo and Charles Spurgeon vs. A. W. Tozer are still too close to call. Vote now to decide who moves on!

Best-selling authors from Rounds 1–3

Save 40% on titles by:

Save 35% on titles by:

Save 30% on titles by:

Four more authors’ works will go on sale today at 45% off. And remember: for the authors who advance, you’ll get at least a 50% discount. You choose which authors move on.

Vote now!

Be the First to See Our TV Commercial!

We’re airing our first-ever television commercial during the History Channel’s “The Bible” series. And we want you to be the first to see it.

“The Bible,” the popular 10-hour docudrama, presents the Scripture’s stories from Genesis to Revelation. Since we’re all about getting into the Word, we can’t wait to share Logos with an audience ready to take the next step with their Bible study.

So take a look at our inaugural television commercial, and then invite all your friends and family over on Sunday, March 24, to watch it in the next episode of “The Bible!”

Don’t forget—you can subscribe to our YouTube channel and see all of our super videos!

Of Flying Spiders and Theologians

Jonathan_EdwardsWhile flying spiders may sound like something gamers would blast in the latest Xbox game, one young man saw in them the wisdom of God.

The technical term for how spiders seem to fly across a distance is ballooning. That observer noted of their flight “the exuberant goodness of the Creator, who hath not only provided for the necessities, but also for the pleasure and recreation of all sorts of creatures, even the insects.”

Those eyes self-trained to see the extraordinary hiding amid the ordinary belonged to Jonathan Edwards. His first published work, in 1723, examined the curious aerial habits of field spiders, a lowly creature ignored by the less discerning.

Looking for enlightenment in what others missed marked Edwards. Following his conversion at 17, he applied scientific observation to the study of both natural and spiritual realms. When the Holy Spirit fell upon his congregation in the early days of the Great Awakening, Edwards called on his understanding of science and the Spirit to observe and record the happenings. Later, that synergy helped Edwards make sense of this great move of God.

The great take risks, both in science and in the Christian life. For Edwards, detailing the workings of God in the lives of men and women put him at odds with established religious thought. Even the congregation he served for 20 years failed to grasp what Edwards understood of the work of the Spirit in the life of the believer. The man who many today consider America’s greatest theologian was dismissed in 1750.

Edwards tested the limits of physical science, too, occasionally offering himself as test subject. As an example to the Native Americans he loved and to whom he preached, Edwards embraced the relatively new science of inoculations to prevent disease. Risk is no respecter of persons, however. On March 22, 1758, a botched smallpox inoculation delivered the 54-year-old Jonathan Edwards into the arms of the Lord.

It’s not just field spiders people pass by without notice. Life in the Spirit goes unexamined by most.

“No man is more relevant to the present condition of Christianity than Jonathan Edwards,” wrote D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. Indeed, the greatest need in the church today may be for the spiritual “scientist” who observes, tests, and comprehends the signs of the times.

Jonathan Edwards saw. And he understood.

Be the Edwards of today through the spiritual observations of the Edwards of yesteryear. Find that
wisdom in The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

Because the spiritual wisdom of the past unlocks the gateway to the future.

Today’s guest post is by Dan Edelen. Dan writes from his farm in southwest Ohio, where he lives with his wife and son. Since 2003, his blog, Cerulean Sanctum, has been challenging believers to question the status quo. Yet for all Dan’s online gravitas, people who meet him in person are more likely to comment on his NFL linebacker size, his fixation with board games, and his love of laughter.

The Theological Consequences of Kant

When it comes to philosophy, nearly everyone’s heard of Immanuel Kant—and for good reason. Kant resolved a century-long gridlock between the rationalists and the empiricists by proposing a new way of thinking about how we come to know anything at all. Kant is also famous for inspiring competing interpretations. In his wake, two fascinating thinkers proposed different ways of understanding Kant’s theological consequences: Friedrich Schleiermacher and Georg Wilhelm Hegel.

Kant’s revolution

The rationalists argued that knowledge results from the proper use of reason, whereas the empiricists claimed that knowledge derives from sense experience alone. Kant redefined the terms of the debate by asserting a more fundamental claim: we don’t conform to the objects of our perception; rather, they conform to us. We don’t perceive objects in and of themselves; instead, our mind shapes how we perceive objects and the world.

In doing so, Kant made the knower, not the known, the primary object of philosophical inquiry. By extension, we can only know things as they appear to us, not as they are in themselves. This turn toward the subject not only moved the conversation beyond the rationalists and empiricists—it revolutionized the direction of Western philosophy.

Schleiermacher

Since we don’t directly perceive God, Kant’s turn toward the subject undermined the claims of orthodox Christian belief. Friedrich Schleiermacher negotiated Kant’s critique by redefining religion as feeling—the capacity to sense the infinite—believing this to be the best way to preserve the possibility of Christian theology. Neither a creed requiring our assent, nor a moral code that must be followed, religion is consciousness of our absolute dependence on the infinite.

Schleiermacher considered it his responsibility to awaken and cultivate this consciousness in others. He attempts to do so in On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers, arguing that religion’s dogmatic claims—which, after Kant, cannot be established as knowledge—are not religion at all. True religion lies in that which inspired theologians to first speak about God at all: the feeling of absolute dependence on the infinite.

Hegel

Unlike Schleiermacher, Hegel criticized Kant’s critique. He maintained that there is no meaningful way to distinguish between things-in-themselves and our perception of them. He did away with things-in-themselves, asserting that our thoughts about the world are synonymous with the way the world actually is. He also considered the fundamental category of reality to be Mind or Spirit, of which we are simply a part.

Hegel understood the development of human history as coterminous with Spirit’s coming to know itself. His Phenomenology of Mind outlines this dynamic, evolving process in terms of dialectic. In works containing his lectures, Hegel articulates how the evolution of history and religion also reflect this process. For Hegel, Christianity represents the culmination of all religious forms—the one that most accurately reflects Spirit’s understanding of itself.

Understand Kant’s influence on German theological thought

Together, the Friedrich Schleiermacher Collection and the Works of Hegel give you the central texts of these important German thinkers. Discover how they wrestled with Kant’s thought and developed theological proposals that continue to influence Christian theology today. Both collections are on Community Pricing for 80% off! With more bids, the price could drop even further.

Bring these core texts into your library—place your bid now!

Then keep reading—what if only perceptions existed, not objects?

Save $100 on the Paul’s Letters Collection

Paul's LettersTo celebrate shipping Lexham Bible Guides: Colossians, the latest installment of the Paul’s Letters Collection, we’re giving you $100 off the collection’s regular price. Paul’s letters are full of rich theological material and practical advice—and perhaps that’s why these beloved parts of Scripture can be so difficult to comprehend. Even Peter recognized this, when he said, “There are some things in them that are hard to understand” (2 Pet. 3:15–16).

Grasp these difficult but important portions of the Bible

Each chapter of the Lexham Bible Guides includes six sections. The “Overview” and “Structure” sections introduce you to a specific passage by briefly summarizing and providing an outline. The “Place within the Book” section explains the immediate literary context and shows how the passage fits into Paul’s argument as a whole. The “Place within the Canon” section goes further by illustrating how Paul’s words fit into the broader context of biblical theology.

“Issues at a Glance” provides you with a quick guide to the major issues in Paul’s letters. It includes a summary of the varying points of view for each issue, along with an annotated list describing which views are held by the top commentaries or other resources. This list includes a summary of the arguments made by each individual author, providing you with the scholarly opinions you may not otherwise have access to. It also provides links to each of the resources discussed, so you can jump right to the relevant section of any Logos resources you own.

Learn relevant cultural context

In addition to the summary of major issues, the “Issues at a Glance” section also includes studies of key Greek words and background studies explaining relevant historical and cultural information. Finally, the “Application Overview” offers you a way to relate the passage to your life or the lives of those you are teaching.

Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection gives you the tools you need to understand the key issues in Paul’s letters. By summarizing research and presenting it in a clear and concise manner, the collection serves as a quick and easy-to-use guide to these important books. Lexham Bible Guides help you go deeper in the Word without spending countless hours on research.

When you purchase this collection, the volumes on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, and Philemon will download immediately, and the remaining volumes will be released as they become available.

Order the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection by April 4 using the coupon code LBGPLC, and you’ll receive $100 off the regular price.

How to Memorize Scripture with Logos

When Jesus was asked, “Which commandment is the most important of all?,” he answered, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.” (Mark 12:28–30).

One of God’s deepest desires is that we love him, but how can we continually grow in our love for God if we don’t know his Word? If our knowledge of God is shallow, how can our love be deep? His greatest command is for us to love him with all our heart, soul, strength and mind—and memorizing Scripture is a great way to keep our love for God and his Word at the forefront of our minds.

Many of us want to be memorizing Scripture, but can’t seem to find the time. And even when we do find time, we aren’t quite sure where or how to begin.

Logos 5 makes memorizing Scripture easier than ever.

 

Strengthen your knowledge of the Bible with Logos’ Scripture Memory Tool, and be sure to check out all of Logos 5’s new features.

Make a commitment to memorizing the Word—get Logos 5 today.

Save 40% on John MacArthur, J. I. Packer, John Calvin, and Others!

The votes have been counted—only eight authors remain as contenders for the Logos March Madness championship. Whose work would you like to see discounted by 75%? Vote now!

Then save 40% on:

Need help sifting through over 500 items on sale? Here are a few of the best-selling authors so far.

Round 1 authors:

Round 2 authors:

Don’t forget to vote this round. Only four will move on, and their works will be discounted 50%!

Who do you want to see win? Vote early, and share who you voted for on Facebook, on Twitter, and in the forums!