Free Update! Tim Keller Sermon Archive

Yesterday we issued a free update to the Tim Keller Sermon Archive. If you own this product, you received new sermons without having to lift a finger. Simply restart your software, and the new content should download automatically.

One of the benefits of Logos is that you always have the latest updates to all your resources. Sometimes the updates are small and under the hood. We’re guessing you don’t notice when we add links to new data types or fix a rogue typo. But the cumulative effect of these small updates is that your experience using Logos is always getting faster and better.

But other times, like this, the updates are big and substantial, and we’re delivering you piles of new content.

With Logos, you’ll always have the latest and greatest version, and your books will always be up to date.

If you don’t yet own the Tim Keller Sermon Archive, now is the perfect time to get it. You’ll get all the sermons already available today, plus free updates in the coming months as we continue to transcribe and digitize additional Keller sermons. Get it now!

New Eastern Orthodox Resources at Logos

Those who are familiar with Logos know that we are committed to building the best digital library of Christian resources in the world. As part of that commitment, I am excited to introduce myself as the new product manager for Eastern Orthodox content here at Logos. My goal is to ensure that Logos has not only the widest selection but also the highest quality of Eastern Orthodox products in the digital marketplace.

The Eastern Orthodox Church has over 300 million adherents, with the majority of its faithful living in Northern Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Russia. Since the 1800s, there has been a significant increase in the number of Orthodox Christians living throughout the Western hemisphere, thanks in large part to both the missionary efforts of Russian Christians to Alaska, Canada, and the United States, and the immigration of Orthodox Christians into both North and South America from predominantly Orthodox nations.
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8 Pre-Pubs You’re About to Miss Out On

There are 72 Pre-Pubs shipping in the next few weeks. We know this is a lot to keep track of, so we’ve highlighted a few of the bestselling Pre-Pubs to make sure you don’t miss out on the best prices.

The prices for all these products will be going up soon—some in just a few days. This is your last chance to pre-order these books at the best prices.

  1. Institutes of the Christian Religion
    This is the authoritative translation of Calvin’s Institutes. Not only is it the academic standard, but it’s also the most readable and accessible. It’s $69.95 after it ships, but you can pre-order it for $49.95 right now.
  2. Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: Old Testament
    This is the New International Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament, under a new publisher and a new name. Contributors include John Goldingay, Tremper Longman, Elizabeth Achtemeier, and other prominent scholars. The New Testament counterpart has been one of our bestselling commentary sets; don’t miss your chance to get the Old Testament volumes at a nice discount. The regular price is $239.95 for the set, but you can pre-order it for a little while longer for only $179.95.
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Save Now on the Augsburg Fortress Ethics Collection

The need to apply biblical principles to the significant social and cultural issues of the day is one reason good scriptural interpretation is important. With the nine-volume Augsburg Fortress Ethics Collection, you’ll see how a diverse collection of noted scholars tackle serious issues like sexual ethics, war and nonviolence, global concerns, racism, and more.

Books in this informative collection include:

Moral Issues and Christian Responses

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An Interview with Dr. Craig Blomberg

I recently had an opportunity to talk with Dr. Craig Blomberg, distinguished professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary. Bloomberg is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of 14 books and more than 80 articles in journals or multiauthor works. Many of his writings examine the historical reliability of the Scriptures, and he has also covered such diverse issues as wealth and poverty, hermeneutics, and women in ministry.

Thanks for taking the time to talk with us, Dr. Blomberg. Can you briefly share a little about where you were educated and where you currently teach?

You are most welcome. Thanks for the invitation. I grew up in Rock Island, Illinois, part of the Quad Cities, right on the Mississippi River across from Davenport, Iowa. I went to a Division III Lutheran liberal arts college in my hometown, Augustana College. After teaching a year of high-school math on Chicago’s North Shore, I attended Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois, where I met my wife, Fran. We were married in the summer of 1979, and we left shortly after that for my PhD studies in Scotland at the University of Aberdeen, which is where I became a Baptist.

My first job teaching New Testament studies and Greek was at Palm Beach Atlantic College (now University) in West Palm Beach, Florida, for three years. Then we had an opportunity to live and work in Cambridge, England, for a year, thanks to an invitation and a grant from the British wing of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. There I researched and wrote my first book, The Historical Reliability of the Gospels, and finished (radically) revising my dissertation, which turned into my second book, Interpreting the Parables. We moved to the Denver area in the fall of 1986, where I have taught at Denver Seminary ever since.

The first edition of Jesus and the Gospels was published in 1997. With this second edition, what were some of areas you felt needed to be updated? Also, has your overall understanding of Jesus and the Gospels remained the same since you first published the book over 10 years ago?

The areas that were most updated explain a number of the critical methods that some use for studying the Gospels, especially literary and postmodern criticism, developments in the “quest for the historical Jesus,” claims and counterclaims about the significance of the Gnostic Gospels, and research on the historical reliability of John. Thanks to some devoted research assistants, especially Jonathan Waits (who is now a Baptist pastor in Virginia, and who sifted through a ton of secondary literature for me and identified the studies to which I needed to pay the most attention), the footnotes and bibliographies were very thoroughly revised and updated in every chapter.

I certainly didn’t have any “sea change” in my understanding of any significant topic, but I frequently found better ways of saying things, better support for my positions, and new research that enabled me to nuance my views here and there a little better. If anything, I learned how scholarship as a whole is recognizing more and more material, even in the Gospel of John, that can be accepted as historical, even without presupposing Christian faith. Unfortunately, this is not the scholarship to which the media pays nearly as much attention as it does to the novel and the eccentric.

Gospel scholars like Richard Burridge have argued that the Gospels are best understood as resembling Greco-Roman biography. Would you agree with Burridge—classifying the Gospels as biography—or do you find a better genre to place them in?

They very much are biographies, but some Greco-Roman biographies play somewhat fast and loose with history. So I would prefer to be more precise and call them historical biographies. Of course, we can’t think of either history or biography with contemporary expectations about comprehensiveness, complete chronological ordering, verbatim quotation, or dispassionate chronicle. But by the standards of the world in which they were written—which recounted episodes from people’s lives very selectively, sometimes ordering their material topically, paraphrasing others’ words in a world that had yet to invent quotation marks or feel any need for them, and assuming that the only parts of history that were worth retelling were those from which you could learn lessons—the Gospels would have been viewed as highly accurate.

In part one, you discuss the historical background for studying the Gospels. How does understanding Jesus’ historical context give us a better understanding of the message and theology of the Gospels?

The only way to avoid misunderstanding any writer from any time period is to understand the historical and cultural context in which that writer wrote. To understand fully what Jesus meant by “go the extra mile,” we need to know that Roman soldiers occupied Israel during the first century and could legally commandeer any civilian they came across to carry their equipment for them for up to a mile. But they couldn’t force them to carry it any further. Jesus tells his followers and would-be followers, however, to do so voluntarily, and the expression has made its way into English as proverbial for going “above and beyond the call of duty.” When Jesus is asked if he is the Messiah, one has to understand that Jews were looking for a military and/or political deliverer who would help them rid the land of the Romans. When Jesus seems reluctant to come straight out and say he is their Messiah, or when he tells people not to tell others that he is, it’s because he believes that spiritual liberation is more needed than physical liberation. He realizes that a straightforward identification with the kind of Messiah most of his kinfolk were looking for would lead to serious misunderstandings about his ministry. Countless additional examples could be given.

Since the publication of The Quest for the Historical Jesus, there has been tremendous speculation on the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith. How does your work help inform the layperson about the quest(s) for the Historical Jesus?

I devote about two-thirds of one chapter to quickly and simply surveying the three main quests (or three phases of the quest), the strengths and weaknesses of each, and where we are today. I highlight the main portraits of Jesus popular in today’s scholarly literature, talk a little about why there is such a diversity of portraits, and outline what criteria various scholars use to determine what they will accept as historical. Then, in the section of the book that proceeds sequentially through the life of Christ, I include a short section near the end of each main topic on the principal historical reasons we can consider this collection of teachings or activities something that Jesus really did say or do.

Besides Jesus and the Gospels, what other resources would you recommend to someone who wants to study Jesus and the Gospels more?

That’s an almost unanswerable question. I would have to know first what specific areas they were most interested in, and then how much background they already have. Are we talking about a high-school student from a non-Christian background, a young adult raised in a church that emphasized teaching the Bible and especially the life of Jesus in their Sunday School curriculum, a Christian-college graduate who majored in biblical studies, or a pastor with a doctorate? Because people have such diverse backgrounds, each of my chapters closes with recommendations for further study divided into introductory, intermediate, and advanced resources, and I would refer the interested reader to those highly selective bibliographies.

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The second edition of Jesus and the Gospels: An Introduction and Survey is 30% off right now. Get yours before it leaves Pre-Pub and the price goes up!

Logos 5: Set New Defaults for Note Text

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

During a break at a recent Camp Logos event, one of the students asked how to change the default text used in a Note document. He wanted more default options than appear in Program Settings, located on the Tools menu.

Here’s a nice little feature that allows you to select whatever font, size, and style of text you want to use in your Notes.

First, a summary of the steps listed below:

You can use the formatting bar on a Note file to select default font, size, and style, but the cursor CANNOT be in the Title or Content box when you do so. If the cursor is in one of the text boxes, your selections change only the text in that box, not the defaults.

Here’s how to change the defaults:

Mac:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Click Add note on the Note file toolbar, which: (A)
    • Creates a Title and Content box (B)
    • Activates the formatting toolbar on the Note file (C)
    • Places the cursor in the Note file
  • Click in the Command box, which removes the cursor from the Note file (D)

  • From the formatting toolbar on the Note file, select your desired font, size, and style—these selections are now the new defaults (E)
  • Click Add Note (F) to start using the new defaults (G)

PC:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • From the formatting toolbar on the Note file, select your desired font, size, and style—these selections are now the new defaults (H)
  • Click Add Note (I) to start using the new defaults (J)

If you like this power-user trick, you’ll enjoy all the features of the Logos Bible Software Training Manual volumes 1 and 2.

Win the Ultimate Bible Study Giveaway!

$100,000 Bible study libraryTen days from now, we’ll be giving away more than $100,000 in Bible study resources. Maybe to you.

Drop whatever you’re doing and go visit Win.Logos.com. Enter to win a Grand Prize that includes Portfolio, our ultimate Bible study tool, AND more than 1,900 books from Zondervan. That’s not all. We have seven other prize packs that will turn your head all on their own.

The best news of all? Everybody wins: everyone who enters gets a copy of the Faithlife Study Bible for free. Get instant access to the world’s largest digital study Bible, just for entering.

So what are you waiting for? Enter now!

Once you’ve entered, I’m sure you have friends to tell. Shout it from the digital rooftops of Twitter and Facebook, because this giveaway is just too good to keep to yourself.

The Ministry of Happiness

The Paradox of HappinessToday’s guest post is by René Breuel, author of  The Paradox of Happiness and founding pastor at Chiesa Evangelica in Rome, Italy.

Happiness is a G-rated theme

People say happiness is for kids. For naïve, simplistic folks who buy into easy steps and who have not yet bumped against the complexities of life.

I disagree. Happiness is a serious, vital theme, especially for pastors and Christian leaders. It’s a theme begging for Christian reflection—the word holds within itself a whole cosmos, because our understanding of happiness is our understanding of life. It is a token of our soul, a window into our worldview, and the surest sign of what we prize and what we live for.

I’ve been rather unhappy about our current understandings of happiness. Not only does someone reflecting on happiness today feel dumbed down—“buy this product,” “get this gorgeous,” “follow the seven magical steps”—but (and here I get really worked up) there seems to be no real Christian alternative. Christians have just bought into our consumer society’s definition of happiness without thinking it through critically, and have substituted the self-help steps to happiness with Christian terminology. Rough edges are smoothed and spiritual language is sprinkled, but the approach is still the same: self-centered, self-serving.

Is there an alternative Christian understanding of happiness?

I went on an experiment. Could a Christian understanding of happiness actually spring out of our core beliefs about reality? And could this alternative be not just well-meaning, but really happy, happier than any other alternative?

It was a fascinating experiment. I went back to Jesus and to what I feel is his key insight into life—that we gain life when we lose life, and that we do so when we deny ourselves and take up our crosses to follow him. The result of that reflection is my book, The Paradox of Happiness. And with the book comes a wish: I hope readers come out of the book less worried about their own happiness and, paradoxically, happier than before. I hope they live serenely and joyously because they are less self-oriented.

We don’t find happiness when we try to fulfill our desires—we find it when we stop looking for it and start focusing on serving others. Happiness according to Jesus is generous and unexpected: by letting go, we find; by giving, we receive. Happy are those who share their happiness.

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Begin your journey to true happiness. Download The Paradox of Happiness today.

Simplify Your Bible Searches

Are you studying significant—but lesser-remembered—characters in the life of David, but not sure how to spell Mephibosheth? That’s okay. Logos 5 makes Bible searches as easy and intuitive. Just start typing, and Logos 5 will anticipate your topic options. Want to dig deeper into a specific subject? Logos 5 suggests new, related searches.

With Logos 5, you won’t spend valuable time hunting for a particular topic. Just begin typing, and let Logos 5 find what you’re looking for.

When it comes to Logos 5′s amazing features, Search Suggestions is just the tip of the iceberg. Put these features to work for you today. Compare our base packages to see which one’s right for you. Then take 15% off that base package through May 20 with coupon code SPRINGSALE!

Save 15% on a Base Package during Our Spring Sale!

Logos Base PackagesFor a limited time, you can save 15% on Logos 5 in our Spring Sale. Just use coupon code SPRINGSALE through May 20!

You’ll get a massive digital library and the most powerful Bible study tools available. You’ll find biblical answers, gain a deeper understanding of the text, and apply the Bible to your life.

Do better Bible study with Logos 5

Base packages give you hundreds or thousands of biblical and theological resources. Logos 5 connects your texts, allowing you to jump from Scripture to commentaries, from sermons to source texts, from arguments to evidence. Learn the original meaning of biblical words, read others’ interpretations of any biblical passage, and find biblical answers in seconds.

Logos 5’s Timeline catalogs every major event in biblical and church history, allowing you to explore biblical connections in context. The new Clause Search helps you find exactly what you’re looking for, linking Scripture’s pronouns and phrases to the people, places, and things they refer to. The Topic Guide gives you topic-specific lists of passages, articles, and themes—starting points for deeper study. See all the new features

The Logos 5 lineup:

  • Portfolio: over 2,500 resources, every Logos 5 feature, and the largest collection of books, with a print value of $78,000!
  • Diamond: over 2,000 resources and all the Logos 5 features—a library worth over $52,000 in print.
  • Platinum: 1,370 resources and all the Logos 5 features, with a print value of $28,700.
  • Gold: nearly 1,100 resources and all our features—a library worth $21,000 in print. 
  • Silver: a library of nearly 700 resources, worth $13,000 in print, with the Timeline, Sermon Starter, and more. 
  • Bronze: the essentials for studying the Bible by passage and topic—429 resources valued at $8,000 in print.
  • Starter: a Bible study foundation, with nearly 200 resources and a print value of $3,500.

Save 15% on Logos 5 today!

This sale lasts only until May 20—use coupon code SPRINGSALE to get the most powerful Bible study tools available.

Save on Logos 5