The Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians Is Now Available!

When the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians was first announced, it received a positive response and quickly went into development. Now you can use it to study any passage in Galatians.

For example, let’s say you want to study Paul’s words about the curse of the law in Gal. 3:10–14. Just open the Passage Guide and type in the reference. The Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians shows up among your commentaries:

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If you click that link, you’re taken right to Spurgeon’s words on Galatians 3:10. In the middle of his exposition, Spurgeon provides an illustration on the futility of trusting in one’s own ability to keep the law. Illustrations are set off by a gray background:

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If you’re interested in Spurgeon’s thoughts on how to apply this passage (part of the larger section of Gal. 3:1–14), you can skip down to the end of the section to find the first of three applications:

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Finally, if you have some of Spurgeon’s other works in your library and want to read more from the sources mentioned in the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians, you can find them by looking beneath the application section:

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The Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians isn’t the only way to see Spurgeon’s thoughts presented in commentary format. Get Spurgeon’s insights into Hebrews, Philippians, 1 & 2 Peter, and five more books—pre-order the Spurgeon Commentary Collection: New Testament Letters while you can still get the Pre-Pub price!

The Importance of the Church Fathers

The theological insights of the early Greek and Latin Church Fathers have shaped the course of Christian history. From the Trinity and original sin to the scriptural canon and just war, looking to the early Church Fathers helps us better understand the development of Christian doctrine throughout the millennia.

The Church Fathers’ explorations of Scripture have grounded biblical commentary up to the modern era. To ignore the writings of great theologians like Augustine, Basil, Ambrose, and Chrysostom is to ignore the very roots of Christian theology. But these early patristic texts can be either difficult to find, difficult to understand (because of translation issues), or both.

In Logos, The Fathers of the Church Series provides an all-in-one patristic resource that eliminates two primary difficulties in patristic research: scope and translation. It is by far the most exhaustive patristic resource available in Logos, giving you an unparalleled ability to study these formative years in Christian history. With nearly 50,000 pages of primary-source material spanning the first through fifth centuries, easy-to-read translations brand-new to Logos, and an array of titles that can’t be found anywhere else, this series is unlike any other in the world of patristic scholarship.

A few people have had questions regarding what’s in this series compared to our Early Church Fathers Collection. Here’s what you should know:

  •    Though there is a little overlap between this series and the Early Church Fathers collection, the vast majority of these texts are brand-new to Logos. 
  •    Even with the resources that do overlap (such as some of Augustine’s works), the Fathers of the Church Series provides totally new translations produced by top-tier scholars. In many cases, the texts in the Fathers of the Church Series are easier to read and digest.
  •    About 20 of this series’ works are available in the public domain. The rest can only be purchased from publishers, and you’ll find some titles that are exclusive to this series.
  •    The series is divided into five main collections, which you can choose to purchase individually:
  1. Fathers of the Ante-Nicene Era (23 vols.)
  2. Greek Fathers of the Nicene Era (35 vols.)
  3. Latin Fathers of the Nicene Era (25 vols.)
  4. St. Augustine (30 vols.)
  5. Fathers of the Post-Nicene Era (14 vols.)

With Logos’ tools and functionality, this series is hands-down the most powerful patristic study tool available anywhere.

Explore the roots of Christian history and theology with the best patristic library on the market: pre-order the Church Fathers Series today!

Save on 180+ Products All October Long!

October Sales Blog Header

 

We’re featuring over 180 sales all month long! Here are some of our top October deals:

2,200 Quotations from the Writings of Charles H. SpurgeonSpurgeon 2

Regularly $25—get it for $22.95

Tom Carter invested 10 years in reading Charles Spurgeon’s 3,561 sermons. The result of his work is this powerful collection of over 2,200 Spurgeon quotes and spiritual insights, perfect for sermons, research papers, and daily inspiration.

Get 75% off Studies on Genesis (11 vols.)

Regularly $599.95—get it for $148.95

10VTemplateThis collection combines thoughtful, challenging, and at times provocative research on Genesis from biblical, historical, and textual scholars. Each volume represents years of original research: some volumes are adaptations of dissertations and theses; others result from conferences or symposia on topics related to Genesis. The resulting collection combines some of the most significant scholarship on Genesis from the past decade.

Get 60% off the Christian Approaches to Contemporary Thinking Collection (6 vols.)

Regularly $299.95—get it for $120.95Christian Approaches to Contemporary Thinking

This collection interacts with Western and Eastern philosophies, showing the potential for theology beyond these intellectual paradigms. The included titles examine free will in heaven, Christian vs. modernist conceptions of suffering, conversion from Buddhism to Catholicism, recovering the sense of the sacred, wisdom in the contemporary world, and more.

Get 51% off A History of the Jewish People in the Time of Jesus Christ (5 vols.)

Regularly $179.95—get it for $87.95A History of the Jeswish People

This classic set provides a richly detailed look at the world in which Jesus and his disciples walked. It includes essays on the political and religious establishments of the day (both Roman and Jewish), portraits of leading figures, coverage of messianic movements, cultural details, and surveys of relevant Jewish and Greek literature, including the apocrypha and pseudepigrapha. Schürer’s classic work, which covers the centuries preceding and following Christ’s life, is still frequently cited today.

Get 31% off the Gesenius Hebrew Bundle

Regularly $79.95—get it for $54.95Gesenius Hebrew Bundle

William Gesenius, a German Bible professor, was one of the leading Hebrew scholars of his day. For students of Hebrew, this reference grammar and lexicon has been among the most trusted and definitive resources for over a hundred years.

You don’t need a coupon code to take advantage of these special deals—just make sure you get them before the month is over. Take advantage of October’s deals today!

Logos 5: Proximity Search for the Teachings of Christ

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A logos user recently emailed me the following scenario:

I’m trying to do an in-depth search on the teachings of Christ. Not how he lived, but what he taught. I’ve tried doing a basic “teachings of Christ” phrase search, but that didn’t really turn up what I thought I was going to find. What’s the best way to locate this information?

Excellent question! Here’s how:

The Bible itself isn’t tagged with the metadata label teachings of Christ; it just contains those teachings. Thus, we want to search our books for where the authors list or catalog what Christ taught. If we execute a phrase search, we’re only looking for a specific wording, such as teachings of Christ. If the author uses phrases like Christ’s teachings or teachings of Jesus, we won’t find what we’re looking for. It’s better, therefore, to use a proximity search, as I detail below:

  • Click the Search icon.
  • Select Basic as the search type (A).
  • Select Entire Library or a specific collection from the range dropdown list (B).
  • Type this search string in the Find box: (Jesus,Christ) WITHIN 2 words teach (C).

  • Click the Search panel menu (D).
  • Select Match all word forms (E).

  • Press the Enter key, or click the Go arrow to generate the search results (F).

The above search locates all the places in our resources where the words Jesus or Christ occur within two words of teach, teaching, teachings, etc.!

When you’re trying to locate subject matter rather than specific phrases, proximity searches work wonderfully.

Celebrate William Tyndale: Get 25% off His Works

William Tyndale

“Christ desires his mysteries to be published abroad as widely as possible. I would that [the Gospels and the epistles of Paul] were translated into all languages, of all Christian people, and that they might be read and known.”
—William Tyndale

Tomorrow marks the 477th anniversary of William Tyndale’s death. Reflect on his life and influence with The Works of William Tyndale —for 25% off!

You’ll get key pieces of Tyndale’s work and theology, including The Practice of the Prelates and The Obedience of a Christian Man, which was instrumental in King Henry VIII’s decision to separate the Church of England from Rome.

A game changer in Christian history

William Tyndale was one of the most important figures of the English Reformation and Western history as a whole. His English translation was the first complete Bible to be translated directly from the Greek and Hebrew into English. Coupled with the invention of the printing press, that translation made the Tyndale Bible the first-ever mass-produced English Bible—and made Scripture available to commoners for the first time in history.

Works of William TyndaleTyndale’s impact on the modern Bible can’t be overstated—research suggests that 83% of the King James Bible’s New Testament was taken verbatim from Tyndale’s work, and 76% of the Old Testament.

Despite Tyndale’s positive impact on spreading Christianity, the Roman Catholic Church saw his making the Bible available to commoners as a direct challenge to its authority. Because of this, in 1535, Tyndale was betrayed by a friend and turned into the authorities, and on October 6, 1536, he was condemned as a heretic and burned at the stake. Tyndale’s dying wish was that God would “open the King of England’s eyes,” and just two years later, his wish came to fruition: King Henry VIII authorized the “Great Bible,” largely made up of Tyndale’s work, to be read aloud in the Church of England.

Learn more about Tyndale’s life and influence: pre-order the 3 vol. Works of William Tyndale. This Pre-Pub is about to ship—pre-order it for 25% off before the price goes up!

Pre-order These Youth Ministry Collections Before They Ship!

youth-ministry-and-leadership-collection

Students are home from summer vacations, school is back in session, and youth leaders are preparing for a busy season of teaching. If you’re involved in youth ministry, now is the time to add some valuable ministry and leadership content to your library!

Pre-order these collections now and you’ll get them at the discounted Pre-Pub pricing:

Youth Ministry and Leadership Collection

Regularly $184.95—get it for $129.95 on Pre-Pub

This 20 vol. collection provides ideas, tips, and suggestions for leading today’s youth. Investing in your role as a caregiver will multiply your impact in the lives of teenagers, free you to know that God will strengthen you during difficult ministry moments, and encourage you to see yourself as someone who can make a lasting difference. You’ll find yourself regularly returning to this collection for inspiration, ideas, and insights as you progress through your ministry journey.

youth-and-emerging-adult-collectionYouth and Emerging Adult Collection

Regularly $55.18—get it for $40.95 on Pre-Pub

Get a practical theology for emerging adult ministry, as well as insights into the key developmental issues of this stage of life. These three volumes discuss identity, intimacy and sexuality, morality, church involvement, spiritual formation, vocation, mentoring, and more. The authors—Dean Borgman, David P. Setran, Chris Kiesling, and Mark W. Cannister—offer more than 80 years of combined wisdom. Pastors, parents, counselors, and anyone else involved in youth and young-adult ministry will benefit from these works.

college-press-evangelism-collectionCollege Press Evangelism Collection

Regularly $89.95—get it for $69.95 on Pre-Pub

In Matthew 28:19, Jesus says, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations.” How do Christians respond to the Great Commission? What are the requisites for evangelism? The College Press Evangelism Collection gives you the tools to be “prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you” (1 Peter 3:15). It offers encouragement and insight to Christians who want to become missionaries in their community.

teachers-bible-commentary-seriesTeacher’s Bible Commentary Series

Regularly $49.95—get it for $39.95 on Pre-Pub

This commentary is designed to help teachers reach children and youth in a variety of settings—family, church, day school, the mission field, or anywhere else the Bible is being taught. It directs both experienced and inexperienced teachers to a richer understanding of Scripture, and prepares them to lead students to the Bible’s grand narrative of redemption. It also offers Scripture-memory verses for three age levels.

Equip yourself to raise up the next generation of leaders—pre-order these collections today!

The Advantage of Books Published by Logos

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collectionWhen you own a book in Logos, you’ll receive periodic updates—absolutely free. These revisions offer more than just corrected typos. You get more recent data, new milestones for better navigation, links to new resources, and increased functionality.

Updating original content

We’re now publishing original content, like the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the Faithlife Study Bible, and the Lexham Bible Guides. Because we produce these resources in-house, we’re able to update them by adding brand-new content. We’ve already added to the Faithlife Study Bible and the Lexham Bible Dictionary, and now we’re adding content to make Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians even better.

Updating Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians

Many of you have purchased Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians either as an individual volume or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Written as a research guide, it has already helped many of you deepen your study of Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians by highlighting the critical issues in the text, pointing you to the key commentators, and explaining their positions.

Now we’ve enhanced the guide with more than 30% new content, including more analysis, more annotated links for each of the issues discussed, and several new Issues and Background Studies. We’ve also added discussions of nine additional commentaries, including new links to 18 different journal and dictionary articles. This added content will help you study Ephesians’ key interpretive issues while connecting you with the depth and breadth of your Logos library.

Incorporating your feedback

After releasing Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians—the first Lexham Bible Guide we produced—we received some helpful feedback from you on how we could make it even better. We listened to your ideas, and we learned from writing later volumes in the series, like the Genesis Collection. Based on this input and experience, we’ve incorporated a broader range of commentaries in annotated links from the Ephesians volume, including more discussion of resources available in base packages, like John Muddiman’s commentary on Ephesians from Black’s New Testament Commentary Series. We’ve also added specific Bible milestones throughout the Issues and Key Word Studies, making it easier for you to navigate.

The best part is that if you already own Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians, you get all of this new content absolutely free. If you don’t own it yet, you can get it today as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Use coupon code LBGEPOC to receive 10% off through October 31!

Logos Mobile Education: Focus on Faculty

LME-LogoA few months ago, the era of Logos Mobile Education began with the Pre-Pub release of the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle. Mobile Ed brings the professors, the library, the visual demonstrations of software features, and the online classroom community directly to you—on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device. It’s education where you are.

A distinguishing feature of Mobile Ed is its faculty. Mobile Ed professors are seasoned classroom teachers, each with a minimum of 10 years’ experience. They’re also dedicated scholars and clear thinkers with considerable experience teaching in the local church. Many are well known as authors of books in the Logos Digital Library.

Experience, scholarship, and engagement

Faculty participation in Logos Mobile Ed was driven not only by experience and scholarship, but also by each professor’s ability to engage the audience in a conversational style. Mobile Ed lectures aren’t recorded with a video camera in the back of the room. The professors speak directly to you, one on one, in brief lecture segments.

The Mobile Ed format allows us to include professors from institutions all over the world. This enables us to present curricula offering specific interpretive and theological viewpoints from professors committed to those perspectives, while also allowing you to explore alternative positions if you so desire. The result is a unique faculty of scholar-communicators whose assembly would be impossible in a traditional educational experience.

Take the next step—or get started—on your journey to greater biblical and theological knowledge today with the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle

Why Philosophy Matters

People talk about philosophy in terms of “or.” Philosophy or faith. Philosophy or literature. Philosophy or science, as if the mind were incapable of doing both and reaching its own conclusions.

But that position is ahistorical—great thinkers have long worked across disciplines—and counterproductive: you can glean profound insights from philosophy without emptying it of artistic value, without betraying scientific principles, without sacrificing your faith.

Whatever your worldview, philosophy matters.

Here’s why:

1. Philosophy helps you engage your culture

ancient-philosophy-bundleTo understand your culture, you need to understand its prevailing ideas. When you know philosophy, you can see where modern perspectives come from.

If you’re a pastor, understanding the culture helps you identify and address your congregation’s weaknesses, doubts, and blind spots. If you’re a student, it helps you think clearly about who we are, how we got here, and where we’re going. If you’re a parent, it helps you answer your child’s questions about the world.

2. Philosophy sharpens your critical thinking

“The test of a first-rate intelligence,” wrote F. Scott Fitzgerald, “is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.” In that case, the study of opposing ideas is the training of intelligence. And philosophy is nothing if not the study of opposing ideas—universal classes of things vs. heterogeneous individual things, nonexistent selves vs. essential selves, rationalism vs. empiricism. As you follow the Great Conversation through the ages, you’ll consider more and more opposing accounts of the world. You’ll learn to recognize sophistry and language games, as opposed to attempts at truth.

(If you disagree with my arguments here, why? Have you found an unquestioned assumption, a circular argument, an inadequate proof? If so, you’re doing philosophy’s rhetorical work—and isn’t that a critical skill worth strengthening?)

3. You can cherry-pick the good

Some of the West’s most creative thinkers combined insights from disparate disciplines. Their genius wasn’t raw innovation; it was the creativity to pick out elements of disparate worldviews and combine them into something new. You can do the same—you can pick out philosophy’s useful elements without accepting the whole thing.

  • Not a postmodernist? You can still find insights into language in the twentieth-century “linguistic turn,” which studied how words’ forms (signifiers) and senses (signifieds) interact to create meaning.
  • Disagree with Kant’s conclusion that things in themselves are unknowable? You can still incorporate his categorization of knowledge as either sensible (five red balloons) or conceptual (fiveness, redness).
  • Not an existentialist? You can still appreciate Kierkegaard’s nuanced readings of Abraham, Job, and infinite faith.

4. When you know the old claims, you know the counterarguments

modern-philosophy-bundleSince most of today’s ideas aren’t new, neither are most of the interesting counterarguments. When you know intellectual history, you know time-tested answers—in advance.

  • Are you arguing with someone who doesn’t trust our sensory perceptions of the world—who thinks we might all be dreaming, or brains in a vat? Berkeley and Hume advanced similar arguments; Thomas Reid has already responded that common-sense belief in the world is the basis for any meaningful philosophy.
  • Defending moral absolutes against a relativist? Turn to the arguments of Socrates and Plato, who’ve already developed arguments for morality built on the notion of absolute truth.
  • Debating a vehement atheist who claims that the universe nowhere testifies to a creator? Aristotle, St. Anselm, Descartes, and Leibniz are ready with rational counterarguments.

5. Philosophy helps you understand your faith

Christian theology didn’t develop in a vacuum—Paul found philosophy worth engaging, after all. From then on, philosophy and theology developed side by side, but deeply intertwined. Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Kierkegaard—many of philosophy’s greatest thinkers were Christian, and many of philosophy’s greatest works address issues relevant to Christians (God, morality, origins). And philosophy is just as useful when it’s not Christian: it’s the context against which theological thought defined itself, so when you know the one, you better understand the other.

Even within deist thought, orthodox positions developed against a backdrop of unorthodox alternatives. As you study Western intellectual history, you’ll come across some nonbiblical but fascinating notions of the divine:

  • There’s Eriugena’s God, who “does not know . . . what He is because He is not a ‘what,’ being . . . incomprehensible both to Himself and to every intellect.”
  • There’s Alain de Lille’s God, “an intelligible [intellectually knowable] sphere, whose centre is everywhere, and whose circumference is nowhere.”
  • There’s Spinoza’s infinite God, roughly synonymous with the whole universe, of which thought, matter, and even human souls are all attributes.

Such alternative accounts are the negative space: the context against which, over time, modern theology established itself. To understand them is, in turn, to more fully understand the orthodox.

6. Philosophy matters because its questions matter

The value of philosophy isn’t just in its answers—it’s in the questions it asks. Though religion and philosophy disagree on much, they’re concerned with similar questions.

  • How should we live?
  • What are good deeds?
  • What can we know, and how?

If you’re thinking about these questions, you’re doing the work of philosophy. You may reach conclusions vastly different from those of Plato or Kant, but you’re still interested in the same things. That alone makes philosophy worth studying.

* * *

noet-classical-foundations-bundleFor centuries, thinkers have turned to the West’s philosophical canon for time-tested wisdom, fascinating questions, and sheer intellectual pleasure. Now, with Noet, you’ll be able to study these works in the most useful format they’ve ever appeared in.

Noet’s Classical Foundations Bundle (124 volumes, plus the Perseus Classics) sets you up with the core texts of the Western tradition: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant, as well as Homer, Dante, Milton, Dostoyevsky, and far, far more. With Logos’ original-language tagging and smart searches, you’ll be ready to grasp Greek and Latin nuance and find just what you’re looking for.

Philosophy matters. Study it with the very best tools.

Pre-order your Classical Foundations Bundle before the price goes up, or customize your library with Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles.

Or keep reading—how well do you know the sophists?

What Informs Your Interpretation of Genesis?

lexham-bible-guides-genesis-collectionWhat influences your interpretation of Scripture? What is the origin of the particular interpretation you hold? Are you familiar with alternative interpretations? How would you defend your interpretation against others?

Although apologists are usually the ones asking these questions, anyone seeking to interpret Scripture should do the same. We think of ourselves as unbiased, logical people, but reading others’ opinions reveals whether we truly are. Such reading also informs our discussions about Scripture, making us better interpreters and better conversationalists, evangelists, and preachers.

Each part of Scripture deserves close examination, but Genesis holds a special place in the canon. It’s a rich, complex book that’s referenced throughout the Bible and that serves as a theological backdrop for much of Scripture. As such, it will shape how you interpret the Bible.

We all wrestle with questions about the origins of the world, the first sin, and where we came from. Genesis tells the story of humanity and God—our story.

The Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection unravels the book’s complicated differences of interpretation. It breaks down each passage, helping you understand what each section contributes and how they fit together. This collection will guide you into a deeper study of Genesis while simultaneously improving your understanding of the entire biblical narrative, which depends on this book’s foundational theology. Understanding Genesis will equip you to answer your own apologetic questions and others’.

Why spend hours in research when Logos can help? Leverage our research team’s work. Get into Genesis in a way that will enhance your understanding of it and the entire Bible. Pick up the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection today.

Through October 18, use coupon code LBGGEN2 to save on Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection.